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October 21, 1972 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-10-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, October 21, 1972

Ecology Center walk-a-thon to

Talking about the war

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raise money, consclol

(Continued from Page 4) most people were against the
rsn ess Lewis immediately plays down obtheyeren't dong a very
the word "rationalize". But he Job. People would overlook
nevertheless begins r u n n i n g gets or misplot things. And
there were 30 to 40 per cent
with a pledge for each mile they through various points of whattwere ret30ytry40gptr dena
walk Schechtman adds that people amounts to a defense. were actually trying to do a
are welcome to walk for free if "I really think that its very im- Tjob."
4thac ran.'t. .,A1nortant to have neonl who aren't Then Lewis launches nto

war,
good
tar-
then
who
good
a dis-

CST T" 0 4-11

Fi UFb E~ ~. T i~ ~U T

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)UtS. l:h115L IN "W

By LOIS EITZEN
For some people, nothing is
worth getting up for early on a
Sunday morning. But for about
150 Ann Arbor citizens, tomorrow
morning will be a chance to have
a long; refreshing walk to learn
about the ecological woes and
wonders of the area, and to raise
money for the Ecology Center.
At the same time, they will have
what is probably a last long look

at the autumn color show.
The second annual Walk-A-Thon
sponsored by the Ecology Center
of Ann Arbor consists of two
routes: a 16-mile stroll for the
strong of heart, and a 12-mile ver-
sion for those who decide they
can't make it the whole way.
The idea, as explained by the
center's director, Mike Schecht-
man, is for participants to collect
a group of sponsors to back them

Ellsberg talks about
govt. spies at EMU

(Continued from Page 1)
ing under the Nixon administra-
tion and the British author's pic-
ture of a monolithic government of
of the future.
"No matter what anyone says,
Nixon has learned something
since he took office," Ellsberg
added. "He has learned from
Johnson that the credibility gap
can work for a President. He
knows that after consistent lying,
he can even tell people the hor-
rible truth and they won't believe
it. What's more, they won't react
to it."
"It's an example of 'double-
think'. People, the public as well
as the decision - makers, have
learned to forget things that need
to be forgotten," he said.
"While traveling across the
country I have encountered peo-
ple who think Nixon is 'winding.
down the war,"' Ellsberg ex-
plained. "It's really incredible.
Nixon* has dropped more bombs
than any other man in history and
is responsible for the destruction
of six million lives. Yet many peo-
Dancing
with a sway
(Continued from Page 1)
her real name, is American and
learned to belly dance in San
Francisco. "Belly dancing can
be a very subtle thing," she said.
"I won't say that it's not seduc-
tive or erotic though, because it
really should be."
After warming up the class
briefly with stretching exercises,
she began teaching hip rotations,
promising that the women would
learn to become "equally facile
on both sides."
"Belly dancing produces some
very interesting sensations," one
class member said with a smile.
"I think I'm going to like it."
The course is being offered for
eight weeks by Art Worlds-a
multi-media studio on Main St.
that is planning other workshops
in photography, crafts and per-
haps astrology.- A nature photog-
raphy class has already begun.
The beginning belly dancers
seemed satisfied wjth their pro-
gress after one class. Oakley, for
instance, laughed and said, "As
soon as I get home, I'm going to
wake my husband and dance for
him. If that doesn't turn him on,
nothing never will."
UM-Flint to
move site
(Continued from Page 1)
obtain funds for innovation even
though the money isn't in their
budget.
The departments will borrow
money from a fund to hire new
faculty and repay it by not hiring
new faculty as present faculty
retires.

ple think that he has ended the
war."
In assessing.the current political
situation, Ellsberg said, "The
President has created an environ-
ment in which he can reduce the
sphere of influence of the citi-
zen. The people are suffering a
mood of frustration brought about
by theirresponsivenss of the sys-
tem."
"They reason, 'If I can't stop it,
I don't want to be held responsi-
ble. Therefore I don't want to hear
anything about it."'
By accepting the process as ir-
responsive to his will, the .citizen
can free himself of guilt pains for
what his country is doing, accord-
ing to Ellsberg, leaving the ad-
ministration responsible to no one.
Ellsberg referred to his legal
predicament over the distribution
of the Pentagon Papers only brief-
ly to illustrate increasing infringe-
ment upon the basic freedoms of
Americans.
Ellsberg said, "In the past leak-
ing information was not a crime.
It was punishable only by such
administrative penalties as loss of
security classification or posi-
tion."
The, U. S. government is charg-
ing Ellsberg with espionage while
not trying to prove intent to harm
U. S. security. "Intent to harm"
was previously a requirement for
such a charge.
Ellsberg said, "If I am con-
victed a new precedent will be set.
Any person revealing classified
information to the public, even if
the information is completely
harmless to the security of our
country, could be charged with
espionage. What this amounts to
is the creation of an automatic
system of censorship, over which
the public will have no control
whatsoever."

iney canti nm sponsors.
A sneak preview last Friday!
showed the walk to be a delightful
event in itself, ecology aside. It
will include a look at some of the
city's historical buildings, a tour
of the Center's organic garden,
and a view of the site of a pro-
posed recreation area along the
Huron River. The reward for'
choosing the longer route is dis-
covery of a hidden city park along
busy Washtenaw Avenue.
The walk will begin at 8:30 at
the Farmer's Market. It is esti-
mated to last between three and
five hours, depending on which
route you choose.
Money collected from the Walk-
A-Thon will be used to fund exist-
ing programs, explains Carol Cole,
volunteer coordinator of the center.
Since the Ecology Center does not
receive public funds, it is depen-
dent upon donations and private
grants. Such notables as Mayor
Robert Harris and several council
members ignored bad weather last
year to join the parade. More than
100 hikers participated last year
and the walk netted about $2000.
Ecology Center workers expect an
even better turnout this year.
Although Harris reportedly will
-not be walking this year, many
politicos will be. Among them are
Human Rights Party candidates
Steve Burghardt, David Cahill, j
Susan Newell, and Susan Winning.
County Prosecutor William Delhey
and* City Council member Jerry
DeGriek are also expected.
DAILY OFFICIAL

Pvi LalaG w itavc jicvyic vviAv a. I -- ' _.. _ ... ,,..,.

supporting the military, just as
checks on them," he says.
"I know of many missions I
didn't plot very well, bombs that
I didn't target well, that I'm sure
saved lives. Whether they saved
lives in the long run, I don't know,
such as targeting things to the
tops of mountains. There are ways
to do that, or just not reporting
targets so missions wouldn't be
sent against them."

cussion o nis part in organizing
some of the 25,000 *men on active
duty who are in the VVAW, about
underground newspapers he start-
ed at two bases, and about how
,we practically destroyed the ar-
my on the ground."
BUT MY MIND passes over
most of this for the moment, and
sticks to one isolated statement.
My hand hits the rewind switch,
and I play it over. Then again.
In the end, it's a personal con-

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Call 764-0558

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BULLETIN

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYP-WRITTEN FORM to
409 E. Jefferson, before 2 p.m. of
the dy preceding publication and
by 2 p.m. Friday for Saturday and
Sunday. Items appear once only.
student organization notices are
not acceptel for publication. For
more information, phone 764-9270.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 21
DAY CALENDAR
Nutrition Symposium Committee &
Center for Human Growth & Develop-
ment: Inter-University Nutrition Pro-
gram, Mich. Rm., Mich. League, 10
am.-5 pm.
Rive Gauche: bicycle trip and volley-
bali game, 1024 Hill St., 4:30 pm.
University Players: "Endgame," Are-
na Theatre, Frieze Bldg., 8 pm.

i

Hillel Foundation Presents

Stempi en,
Eseli talk

(Continued from Pge 1)
will come in a bipartisan manner."'
Although much of the debate oc-
curred between the candidates,
Stempien was not Esch's only op-
ponent last night.
During a question and answer
period following the debate one
member of the audience attacked
Esch for what he termed a lack
of action on a matter which the
individual had askedt him to in-
vestigate some years ago.
After arguing with Esch for close
to 10 minutes, the individual closed
by saying, "If anybody else has a
problem they shouldn't go to this
guy here because he'll wait until
the place below freezes over."
Roman legends held that the
second king of Rome and successor
of its legendary founder, Romulus,
was Numa Pompilius. He is be-
lieved to have founded the order
of Vestal Virgins, appointed the
city's first priests and started many
of its religious and civic institu-
tions.

"The Shop On
Main Street"
Directed by Jan Kadar and
Elmer Kios
Starring Josef Kroner and
Ida Kaminska
ACADEMY AWARD FOR BEST
FOREIGN FILM 1965
" Totally without preten-
sion with two great performers
creating unforgettable portraits,
it stands as one of the finest
films of our time, for all time."
-Judith Crist
8 Pm.
SAT., SUN., Oct. 21-22
at HILLEL, 1429 Hill
50c admission

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mu

Overbeck Bookstore
IS HAVING A
CLEARANCE SALE
OF

THERE ARE EASIER
2 WINTE JOBS
a THAN THIS AROUND ...
SI

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MEDICAL-LAW and GENERAL BOOKS
25c and up
CURRENT AND OLD EDITIONS-NEW AND USED
AND
OFFICE AND SCHOOL SUPPLIES
50% OFF

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