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October 20, 1972 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1972-10-20

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Page :.T-rero..

THE MICHIUAN DAILY

Friday, October 20, 1972

Pae w TEMIH~..DAL

Laird announces
now inspectors

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INADEQUATE TAXING, TEACHING
Study hits New York schools

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Fram Wire Service Reports
WASHINGTON--Defense Secretary Melvin Laird yester-
day announced he is creating.new military inspector gener-
als to detect promptly and report to him any command vio-
lations within the armed services, such as last winter's un-
authorized h6mbing of North Vietnam.
While the move is not a fundamental change in the sys-
tem. of exercising civilian control over the military, it does
seem to contradict somewhat Laird's earlier statements on
the issue.
On Sept. 30, the secretary contended that civilian con-

NEW YORK {A') - A three-
year study of the New York
State school system, the na-
tion's second largest, has found
that it suffers from an inequit-
able property tax system and
inadequate teaching that has left
tens of thousands of youngsters
ill-equipped at reading, writing
and arithmetic.
The study, by an 18-member
commission appointed by Gov.
Nelson Rockefeller, proposed full
state takeover of financing pub-
lic education, leading in five
years to a uniform statewide
property tax for education.
The 1,600- - page report was
described by the commission as
"the most comprehensive study
of an education system in the
postwar era."
T h e commission'sfindings
.were, in effect, another of the
nationwideassaults on the pro-
perty tax as the main source of
funds for education. The com-
mission called the tax discrimi-
natory because the quality of a
child's education depends on the
wealth - or lack of it - of the
community in which he lives.
The commission's recommen-
dations are not binding on New
York's legislature. The first
volume on tax reform has been

on the desks of politicians since
last January, but none of the
proposals has been adopted.
Among the study's more con-
troversial proposals are the use
of busing to foster racial inte-
gration; no state aid to nonpub-
lic schools; adoption of a plan
to teach sex education at the
earliest grades; and a plan
whereby junior and senior high
school students would be requir-
ed to have proof of a physical
examination before registering
for school in order to curb ve-
nereal disease.
A major revamping of sec-
ondary education was proposed
to providestudents with inten-
sified courses in the "Three
R's," and to give juniors and
seniors the option of early col-
lege admission, continuing high
school study or going to voca-
tional school.
In one of its secondary recom-
mendations, t h e commission
charged that elementarynschool
textbooks reflect "rampant and

insidious sexism" and asked that
they be rewritten as soon as pos-
sible, so that Jane is as import-
ant as her brother, Dick.
In the larger cities, particular-
ly New York, the study noted
that certain students, usually
blacks, Puerto Ricans and the
poor, were "tracked" - that
is, diverted into nonacademic
.courses.
Similarly, their teachers were
usually the less experienced, the
poorest trained and the least
well-paid, the commission said in
urging elimination of tracking.
The commission also found
that widely divergent groups of
children - the intellectually
gifted, the handicapped, the bi-
lingual and the minority - were
being stifled if, indeed, they
were being taught at all.
In a large measure, the blame
fell to the state's teachers, who
were described as the highest
paid in the nation but 'were "in-
adequately trained" to combat
this prob em.

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FRIDAY 20 OCTOBER ONLY
BLACKIORPIEEUS
Marcel Comus-1959. A tragic love story loosely following the
Orpheus myth set in the slums of Rio de Janiero during Carnival
time. "Full of intoxicating samba music, frenzied dancing and
violent costumes."-Bosley Crowther

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Cour thears
debate over
smut ases
WASHINGTON (W) - Lawyers
for a convicted California book-
.eller.and a Georgia rcinema yes-
terday called for the Supreme
Court to rule that books and mo-
vies may' be sold or shown to con-
sulting adults without police inter=
ference.
They based their argument on
the First Amendment, "the right
to read to -and to think" rand a
1969 ruling by the :'court that peo-
ple cannot b.e. prosecuted for
watching sexy movies or reading
sexy books 'at home.
The prosecution fought for con-
tinued restraints, citing public
complaints about pornography and
the fact that .erotic books bought,
by adults "don't self destruct"
and ;can fall into :the hands 'of ju-
veniles.
One of the reasons the court
granted review in the cases was
possibly to define the "commun-
ity' standards" 'test ,established in
1957. At that time,- one of the
grounds approved for suppressing
obscene books .was that they of-
fended current attitudes about sex.
But the -court did not say then, or
afterward, whether it meant the
city or town, the region or nation
at 'Iargea
Little was said on the subject
during the argument, though Jus-
tice Potter Stewart indicated he,
at least, - thought the First Amend-
ment'- prohibited using different
standards in one part of the coun-
try from' another.

$trol 'was being exercised effective-
ly, saying "I am completely sat-
isfied with the system we have. I,
think it would be a very grave er-I
ror to make basic changes."'
At that time Laird rejected pro-
posals made by some critics that
Ia civilian official. re rtin direct-

TONIGHT 8 p.m. SHARP
Dept. of Speech Communication
and Theater
University Players
Present
"EN DGAME"
by SAMUEL BECKETT
OCT. 19-20, 24-28
ARENA THEATER
Frieze Building
Individual Tickets $1.50
Trueblood Box Office open
12:30-8:00 p.m.
Latecomers will be seated
at the intermission!

DeLong's Pit Barbecue
FEATURES THESE DINNERS:
4 Bar-B-Q Ribs Shrimp
Bar-B-Q Chicken Scallops
Bar-B-Q Beef Fried Chicken
Bar-B-Q Pork Fried Fish
Fried Oysters
All Dinners Include Fries, Slaw, and Bread

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OPEN: Mon., Wed., Thurs., Sun.- I1 a.m. to 2 a.m.
Fri., Sat.-11 a.m. to 3 a.m.

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CI iv 4ULV .u_;cc, p g J 116 ulc;
ly to him, be posted in each ma-
jor military command.
Laird said the new inspector gen-
erals, who, are military officers,
will be responsible to investigate
subordinate Air Force, Army, and
Navy operations "particularly as
they involve command control."
He. added thatthe officers will
report to him "through the Joint
Chiefs of Staff.
The secretary was optimistic
about the success of his action.
"With the institution of this
change," Laird said, "I am con-
fident that any deviation from op-
erating, authorities or false report-
ing will be promptly detected ..."
Laird announced the creation of
the new posts in a letter to Sen.
John Stennis (D.-Miss.), chairman-
of the Senate Armed Services Com-
mittee, which investigated Gen.
John Lavelle, the man alleged
to be responsible for the unau-
thorized bombings.
In the letter, Laird rejected de-
mands of some members of the
committee for a further Pentagon
inquiry into the bombings.

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A man went looking for America.
And couldn't find it anywhere...
PETER FONDA
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Best Film By a New Director
ALSO
Elliott Gould
in
"Getting Straight"

Israeli Performance'Group
If you want to be a part of an Israeli
folk-dance performance group
Call: Zipora Trope, 761-1687 (Evenings)
Come to Hillel, 1429 Hill, Sundays at 1 p.m.

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UNTIL 9:00 P.M.

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Michigan. Yews phone: 764-0562. Second
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FRIDAY
From the cultural spring'
in Czechoslovakia before
the Russian invasion
comes this highly
acclaimed subtle analysis
of provincial family life.
It was incuded in PBS'
"Film Odyssee" program
of great films.
INTIMATE
LIGHTING
Dir. Ivqn Passer. 1965

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