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October 19, 1972 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-10-19

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, October 19, 1972

Page Six

i

U.S., Soviets sign trade pact

WASHINGTON (P) - The Unit- Soviet debt of $11.1 billion andc
ed States , and the Soviet Union !lend-lease aid extended by the1
yesterday signed a breakthrough United States during World War f
trade agreement designed to set- II;c
tle World War II lend-lease debts, -Granting of most-favored-na-
flatten tariff barriers, grant cre- tion treatment to the Soviet Union.
dits and triple the volume of trade If approved by Congress, this stepI
in the next three years. would remove discriminatoryr
Hailed by Secretary of State trade barriers and put Moscow onc
William Rogers as a step toward the same footing as. free world'
"creating a climate for peace,' nations;I
the agreement follows by five
months President Nixon's Moscow -Make the Soviet Union eligiblec
summit meetings which set the for Export - Import Bank credits.c
negotiations in motion. These credits could be used by
The portions of the agreement the Soviets to purchase products
requiring congressional approval mentioned in the agreement, in-
could trigger a major controversy cluding machinery, plant equip-
on Capitol Hill. More than 70 sen- ment, agricultural goods, indus-
ators are backing legislation to trial products and consumerr
forbid granting of most-favored- goods.t
nation treatment to any country The United States will, in turn,t
charging excessive exit fees - import increased volumes of So-
a measure aimed directly at the viet raw materials. The agreement
Soviets' tax on Jewish emigres. states that the goal is to triple to
Rogers told a White House a three-year total of. $1.5 billionI
briefing that the Jewish exit tax the volume of trade between thec
question is being handled through two countries.
diplomatic channels and that Other provisions of the agree-
"quiet diplomacy holds out pro,-
mise of great success." ment call for each government to
As outlined by administration establish in the other's capital a
spokesmen, the major provisions commercial office, and clear the
of the agreement include: way for private firms to establish
Settlement for $722 million the' in the other's capital a commercial
LING LEE Chinese Food
and Groceries
407 N. Fifth Avenue
In Terrytown Market by Farmer's Market
Fresh egg rolls daily.
Peking duck with paneackes
and others by special order.
TAKE OUT DAILY
No. 1 Peppersteak No. 3 Fried rice (ham,
No. 2. Sweet & sour bacon or shrimp)
pork No. 4. Soups: Wanton
& egg drop
d IHot dinners served or take out onu
he nhome game Fridays
-e- OPEN 'TIL 7 P.M.
..................................................

office, and clear the way for pri-I
gate firms to establish business
facilities. The Soviets agreed to
construct a large trade center in
Moscow.
U, S. Secretary of Commerce
Peter Peterson said the Soviet
minister told him a $60 million
order, mostly for earth - moving
equipment, would be placed today.
The Soviets also have indicated a
desire to purchase several million
dollars in U. S. equipment to man-
ufacture tableware, and U. S. firms
are seeking to bid on $1 billion!
worth of contracts, on the Kame
River truck plant.
The Soviets handed over a $12.
million check as first payment on.
the $722 million settlement. The
balance will be paid off by the
year 2001 and the Soviets will be
allowed to defer four annual pay-
ments. Such deferments will not,
however, change the payoff date
of July 1, 2001.
FOREST.j
FIRES BURNj
MORE.
THAN
TREES

People are not just the cause
of the "population problem.
They're also the. victims.

Fidddling with politics
Art and politics come together at the University of Colorado as
violinist Ozzie Lenhert shows the audience where he stands on the
upcoming election. Audience reaction was mixed, as some chanted
"Four More Years!" and others called for more encores!
'DIPLOMA TAX':
Soviets collect tax
from leavn-lg Jews

Traffic jams. Overcrowded
schools. Inadequate housing.
Increasing unemployment.
Pollution. Almost any urban,
social and environmental
problem you can name is fast
becoming a nightmare.
And in one way or another
affects us all.
Of course, these problems
would still exist even if popula
tion growth were zero, because
population growth is not their
basic cause. Therefore solving
them must obviously become
society's number one priority.
However, the pressures of an
ever-increasing population tend
to intensifyrour problems. And
make them harder to solve.
(By the year 2000, Census
Bureau projections estimate
our population could grow close
to 300 million. That's about 100
million more people to house,
transport, educate, feed and
clean up after !)
This intensifying of problems
by sheer numbers of people can
also occur in individual house--
holds. For just as "too many
people" make society's problems
more difficult to solve, the
problems of raising a family
are not made easier when there
are "too many children."
Under the circumstances, we
feel there's only one reason for
a couple to have a child:
because they really want it.
And are ready for it-
emotionally, and not just
financially.

There's also only one time to
have that child: when it's
wanted. When it can be a
welcome addition rather than
an accidental burden.
Unfortunately, research has
consistently shown that not
enough Americans (from every
walk of life) are aware of the
benefits of family planning.
Or even how to go about it.
That's what we're all about.
And frankly, we can use all
the help we can get.
Especially from thoughtful
people who understand how
unplanned pregnancies can
intensify the already severe
problems society has still
to solve.
People who will, at the very
least, help others understand
that the population problem not
only has a cause. It has victims.
Planned Parenthood
Children by choice. Not chance.
For further information, write
Planned Parenthood, Box 581,
Radio City Station, N.Y., N.Y. 10019

MOSCOW {API - The Soviet Un-
ion is collecting around $3 million
a month from educated Jews pay-
ing the government's new diplo-
ma tax to emigrate, informed
sources said Wednesday.
One Jewish couple bought their
way out with a record payment of
53,000 rubles. At the exchange rate
of $1.20 to the ruble, that is about
$63,000.
The sources said the diploma
tax, decided in secret last Aug.
3, had only marginally affected
the outflow of Jewish emigrants.
Immediately' following the im-
position of the tax - officially
called repayment to the state for
education costs - the number of
emigrants declined.

. Bit as more Jews showe
themselves willing to pay wha
critics have called ransom, ti
rat4 of emigration neared its pre
vious level.
There was also evidence tha
the tax was being imposed almo
exclusively on Jews. The Sovie
press, belatedly revealing th
secret decree," shave said it a
plies to all Russians leaving t
settle in a capitalist country.
In a recent development, twe:
tv Jewish families from Mosco
received permission yesterdayt
emigrate to Israel and were tol
they will not have to pay the cor
troversial education tax if th
leave the Soviet Union by Oct. 2
reliable Jewish sources reporte

a

tat
st
et
he
to
sn-
w
to
ld.
ey
28,
d.

A

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We Don't Just
Publish a Newspaper
* We meet new people
* We laugh a lot
s We find consolation
9 We play football
* We make money (maybe)
* We solve problems
* We debate vital issues
" We drink 5c Cokes
* We have T.G.'s
JOIN the DAILY staff

Planned Parenthood is a national, non-profit organization dedicated to providing
information and effective means of family planning to all who want and need it.
advertising contributed for the public good

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