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October 18, 1972 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-10-18

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F

Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, October 18, 1972 , .

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesdoy, October 18, 1972

U OF M FOLKLORE SOCIETY
WILL MEET
Wed., October 18, 6:30
at Smitty's in South Quad
Pot luck dinner with guest speaker
YVON N E LOCKWOOD
talking about this winter's folklore course

TEXAS SHUTOUT:
Defense spa

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5
1
4
I s

Dept. of German Languages and Literatures v
PRESENTS A LECTURE BY
PETER de MENDELSSOHN
"Thomas Mann and Gerhart Haupfmann as
representatives of the German Mind"
Thursday, October 19
Lecture Hall No. 1, MLB IJ
0 4p m.
BUSES, BIKES, ROADS ?
Democrats need your input.
CITY TRANSPORTATION BOND?
Party Discussion Meeting, Thursday, Oct.19, 8 pm.
Ann Arbor Public Library, 5th and William
CAN'T COME? SEND COUPON TO:
HELGA OkBACH
1223 MORNINGSIDE
ANN ARBOR 48103

By ROBIN WAGNER
"Hook 'em, Horns" is a favorite
expression of University of Texas
football supporters. Last Saturday,
however, the "Horns got hooked"
by second-ranked Oklahoma, 27-0.
The contest was a struggle be-
tween two often maligned, but
powerful defenses. On this day,
each proved to be inpenetrable.
Offensively, tenth-ranked Texas
produced more turnovers than a
pastry shop, Four interceptions
and four fumble recoveries were
all the Sooners needed to remain
undefeated.
The game's deciding play was
an attempted quick kick by the
Longhorns from their own 15-yard
line in the third period. With Okla-
homa narrowly leading 3-0, de-
fensive tackle Derland Moore un-
molestedly rushed Texas signal-
caller and punter Alan Lowry and

blocked his quick kick effort. Be-
fore anyone could say "Darrell
Royal," Sooner middle guard Lu-
cious Selmon was lying on six
points and the pigskin in the end
zone.
Feebly explaining the radical
maneuver, Texas coach Royal la-
mented, "We hadn't quick-kicked
in four years and I didn't think it
would be expected. I'm sure people
who paid $7 for a ticket will ques-
tion the play. Apparently, I'm not
as conservative as e v e r y o n e
thinks."
Describing the crucial play,
Moore stated, "The way they came
out of the huddle, I knew some-
thing was up. It, looked fishy. I
recognized what was happening'
and charged through there."
Poor execution by Texas' seem-
ingly incompetent offense cost
them six more points late in the

rks Sooners
game. An attempted Lowry pitch-, offensive yards was all Oklahoma
out was batted into the Longhorn could show for its day's labors.
end zone where Moore, Oklahoma's Pruitt gained 81 yards on 11 car-
secret scoring weapon, gleefully ries, displaying anything but a
pounced on the ball. leisman Trophy performance in
"It was defense and kicking to- this nationally televised show-
day," summarized Sooner coach down.
Chuck Fairbanks. "They were the When the shouting was over and
deciding factors and it's been a the dust had cleared, Oklahoma's
while since I've said .that after a defense reigned supreme. Not
game." since 1963, a period of 101 games,
From the quiet of the losers' has Texas been shutout and never
locker room, Royal saw it this way. has a Royal-coached squad from
"We came to Dallas ready to Austin been forced to throw 32
play but that was obviously not times in four quarters. The loser's
enough. Their offense scored on multi-faceted wishbone attack was
our offense, not our defense. How- held to 73 rushing yards and the
ever, that's no excuse." closest to paydirt a Longhorn was
Entering the encounter with a allowed to roam was the Sooner
56.3 scoring average and a 621; 25-yard line.
yard total offense average, Greg An old expression Royal creat-
"Super Sport" Pruitt and his of- ed goes, "It's not what you do,
fensive cohorts could do nothing it's how you do it and what you
against the beefy Texans. 273 total do it with." On this particular
day, Texas didn't possess enough
of any of these essentials to de-
throne Oklahoma.
Texas holds a 1-0 record in the
Southwest Conference race, while
"Arkansasleads the pack with an
unblemished 2-0 slate. The confer-
~'ence representative to the Cotton
Bowl could well be determined this
weekend when Joe Fergeson and
his Razorbacks collide with the
Horns.

AP Photo
Wash out
So that yesterday's washout of the third game of the World Series
wouldn't be a complete loss, Oakland owner Charles O. Finley'
employs Vida Blue's batting helmet to corrall some of the hail
stones which pelted the ballpark during the game delay. Finley,
it is rumored, will preserve these freebies from nature and give
them away next year in his wildest gimick gambit to date.

4

S'.

RUSSIANS TOUR COUNTRY:
Soviets, Yanks bounce to draw

I

Money for:

'

Line buses?_
Bike paths?

Dial-a-Ride? __
Bridges?

The 'Big Q' strikes
Michigan's Quint Lawson plucks the ball away fron MSU while Cleland Child (left) waits for the out
pass during a Wolverine rugby match last Saturday. Michigan went on to defeat the Spartans 7-4,
stretching their record to 4-1.

By JANET McINTOSH the case of a tie, the head judge
The red flag of the Soviet Union makes the tie-breaking decision.
was raised in Crisler Arena Mon- In evaluating the athletes the
day night as the United States judges take into consideration the
hosted the USSR in trampoline continuity of the routine, form, the
competition. The finest trampolin- variety of stunts, their level of
fists of two nations met in an difficulty and the performers con-
evenly contested display of skill trol.
which resulted in a 4-4 deadlock. Preceded by an exhibition of Re-
In the women's competition three: bound track and ground tumbling,
US team members competed the Russians were enthusiastically
against three from the USSR in received by the spectators. The two
individual, man-to-man competi- teams seemed to be well matched,
tion, with one point scored for with the final tally being 44.
each match won. A syncronized THE AMERICANS WON4 the
trampoline match between a pair women's competition 2-1 with Leigh
of competitiors from each country Hennessy and Alerandia Nicholson
also counted as one point for a winning their matches. In the
total of four points possible. The men's competition, however, the
same scoring procedure was fol- msitompwsetitiondhwverthe
lowed for the men's competition. situation was reversed with the
Judging man-to-man competition' Russians emerging with a 2-1 lead.
consists of four judges voting on
which of a pair of competitors
they thought performed best. The I £1
performer with the highest num-
ber of votes wins the match. In .

Going into the final match, the
American team led by a narrow
4-3 margin, which the U.S.S.R.
overcame by winning the men's
synchronized, tying the competi-
tion 4-4.
The U.S.S.R. was the victor in
last week's match in Cleveland.
Incluled in their ten day tour of
the United States is a match in
Chicago today. In March, the U.S.
Trampoline team travels to the
U.S.S.R. to reciprocate this good-
will gesture.
The Soviet trampolinists seem
to be enjoying themselves here.
] Olga Strarikova, a 1972 U.S.S.R.
Champion and University student,
remarked, "I am enjoying myself
very much on my first visit here
and hope it will not be my last."

4

Safety sidewalks?___ Overpasses? -

Which Roads? 1.
2.

1
I
!I
_ 1

I1

Don't build

1.

these roads? 2.
Your Name

I

Address ~ _

Paid Political Advertisement

"""--

.

WILD'S

ENACT IS ALIVE!
and we're hard at work doing what we can to help solve
environmental problems around the campus and around the. state.
BUT WE NEED HELP!
So if you're interested in actually getting involved in
the environmental movement corme to' our recruit-
ment meeting WEDNESDAY NIGHT (tonight),
OCTOBER 18 at 7:30 p.m. in room 1040 NATURAL
RESOURCES (Not Natural Science).
SOME OF OUR PRESENT & FUTURE INVOLVEMENTS INCLUDE:
" the transportation situation around campus (including
bicycles).
" a campus-wide recycling program operated jointly by the
U and students.
" the returnable vs. the non-returnable beverage container
issue.
" environmental legislation
" we can always use office help
Plus we'll show a Walt Disney flick called "MOTOR MANIA"
starring Goofy.
PLEASE COME! TONIGHT AT 7:30
ROOM 1040 NATURAL RESOURCES

Come one, come all
Freshmen: If you would like
to be on the Michigan gridiron
as a manager, give David Fish
a call at 761-0533, between 7-10
p.m.

Iickinigs

{._... : ."...:......*:::o">v;.""..."p;:...... . ...:.v. : s%? ; ..: "{
LAST
CHANC
Sign up forh
Senior pictures
'till Oct. 20 on Diag
$2.50

1. MICHIGAN at Illinois
(pick score)
2. Indiana at Ohio State
3. Wisconsin at Michigan State
4. Northwestern at Purdue
5. Iowa at Minnesota
6. Stanford at Oregon
7. Washington at Southern Cal.
8. UCLA at California
9. West Virginia at Tulane
10. Texas at Arkansas

11.
12.
13.
14.
1S.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.

Nebraska at Kansas
Oklahoma at Colorado
Kentucky at LSU
TCU at Texas A&M
Syracuse at Penn State
Georgia Tech at Auburn
Boston College at Pitt
Navy at Air Force
Maryland at Duke
Schenectady Schnook versus
DAILY LIBELS

As we left our heroine last week she was tied to the exhaust end
of a Boeing 747 jumbo jet, fueling for take-off atChicago's O'Hare air-
port. Her would-be savior is unable to- get to her because he is per-
forming delicate open heart surgery on his faithful dog Scruff. Will
he be able to save his girl and pull Scruff through? We'll find out
in a moment but first a word from our sponsor:
Don't forget to get your Gridde picks to 420 Maynard by midnight
Friday.

U

6.

Life Was With People: A Kingdom at Twilight
The Jewish Communities of Eastern Europe
SCHEDULE OF EVENTS-OCTOBER 19-29
Thursday, Oct. 19 - Dr. Cynthia J. Haft Thursday, Oct. 25 - 8 p.m. - Hillel Foundat
asst. prof. of French, N.Y.U 1429 HILL ST.
4:10 P.M.-LECTURE ROOM 2, MODERN
LANGUAGES BLDG. DR. EMIL FACKENHEIM (Univ. of Toronto)
(Co-Sponsor: Dept. of Romance Lang. and Literature) and
"Myth, Symbol, and Transcendence: The Theme of DR. IRVING GREENBERG (CUNY)
Nazi Concentration Camps in French Literature" "The Cursed and The Blessed: The Generation
8 P.M.-HILLEL FOUNDATION, 1429 HILL ST. Aushwitz and Jerusalem - A Dialogue witht
"The Jews in Eastern Europe Today: Communists Theologians"
Concentration Camps and the Memory of a

THE
STUDENT BLOOD
BANK
-will provide for your blood needs if
it can collect 600 pts. this term.
GIVE: Oct. 31-11-5
Nov. 1
Nov. 2
UNION BALLROOM
- - - - -
II~ I-

ion
of
the

I

SH~tI

E
11

People"

Saturday & Sunday, Oct. 21 and 22
8 P.M.-HILLEL FOUNDATION, 1429 HILL ST.
"The Shop on Main Street"
Directed by JAN KADAR and ELMER KLOS.
Academy Award Winner. 50c admission
Monday, Oct. 23 - Arnost Lustig
4:10 P.M.-LECTURE ROOM 2, MLB
(Co-sponsor: Dept. of Slavic Lang. and Literature)

Saturday & Sunday, Oct. 28 & 29 -1429 Hill St.
"THE LAST CHAPTER"
Produced by BENJAMIN and LAWRENCE ROTHMAN
The Life and Destruction of Polish Jewry
50c ADMISSION
Sunday, October 29
DRH I-ERERT PAPR Prf f I inmic+rc LA.A

ALL PANTS:
One pa~r-$s
Two pa i r-$9
Three pair-$1 2
SHIRTS - $8
LEATHER VESTS

KNIT TOPS:
20% off
LEATHER JACKETS
20% off
BOOTS:

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J1 A 1- - .

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