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October 12, 1972 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-10-12

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Nag t t614

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, October 12, 1972

F

v vEgt H IHIA AL

S. Vietnamese watch
as village destroyed

ON HIGHWAY 13, Vietnam (-1
Whatever happens at the Paris
peace talks it will be too late for
the people of Xom Suoi. They
stood on a hillside yesterday and
saw their homes crumble and burn
under a rain of bombs and artil-
lery shells.
Some cried as South Vietnamese
bombers and artillery hammered
the little town and its buildings
burst into flame or spun skyward
in smoke and splinters. Others
watched with a silent detachment
not unlike that of tourists.
The people of Xom Suoi had
been forced to leave the hamlet,
Kissinger,
extends
Pa-is talk.
WASHINGTON (A') - Henry
Kissinger completed a fourth day
of private talks with the North
Vietnamese yesterday and unex-
pectedly delayed his departure
from Paris until today.

which straddles Highway 13, about
20 miles north of Saigon, last Fri-
day when communist troops ar-
rived in the middle of the
night.
For five days the intruders
stayed, as they have in hundreds
of other hamlets, daring South
Vietnamese soldiers to come aft-
er them.
Yesterday, after some delay, the
soldiders did - implementing a
policy established at the highest
levels in the 1968 Tet offensive:
If the communists take a town, or
a building, it will be taken back
even if it means destruction.
An anti - aircraft gun, hidden a
mile or so to the west, pounded
away at the South Vietnamese FS
jets and the slow propeller-driven
Al Skyraiders, but the pilots ig-
nored it almost insolently as they
swept in to blast the town with
high explosives, napalm and 20
mm cannon fire.
Then came the artillery, fur-
nishing covering fire for the in-
fantrymen moving forward from
the south. About the time it seem-
ed sure that nobody could have
survived in Xom Suoi, the North
Vietnamese replied with automa-
tic weapons fire that clattered
across the paddies.
The attack seemed to bog down
almt asit bean- The South Vi-

Rally set'
to support
Prof. Green
(Continued from Page 1)
was scheduling slide showings for
their classes in record numbers,
according to David Houseman of
the Interfaith Council for Peace,
the group which makes the pre-
sentations.
"My' phone has been ringing
constantly all day with requests
for the slide show," Houseman
said yesterday. "We have two sets
of slides but I've had to call Wash-
ington to order another one 'to
meet the demand."
The classes for which the show-
ings are scheduled range from a
computer science class which vot-
ed unanimously to see the pro-
gram to a geography class on cul-
tural and ecological systems.
A number of professors who
have scheduled the slide show ex-
pressed support for Green and dis-
approval of acting chemistry
chairman Prof. Thomas Dunn,
who ordered Green's suspension.
"The freedom of the University,
both its faculty and students, is at
stake," said history Prof. Ernie
Young, who " has scheduled the
slide show for his class.
GLIDING
Glider mail was tested in 1934
when a plane took off from
New York towing three gliders.
As the sky train passed Philadel-
phia, Baltimore and Washington,
the rearmost craft was cut free
from carrying mail for that city.

Turkish Arts & Gifts
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RETURN OF:

The Best of
the First
Annual
N.Y. Erotic
Film Festival

COME TO THE ISRAELI
BET CAFE
(COFFEEHOUSE)
An evening of Israeli song, food, dance,a
ing friends!!

and mak-

AP Photo
Kent1edys confer
Caroline Kennedy, daughter of the late President John Kennedy,
and Joan Kennedy, wife of Sen. Edward Kennedy (D-Mass.)
listen as Sen. Kennedy introduces George McGover'n at a fund
raising dinner in Boston.
DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

" EAT felafel and pita
" SEE the movie "Beyond the Mirage"
" MEET people who share a common interest
in Israeli happenings, problems, culture.
Enjoy socializing in an informal,
Israeli atmosphere.
TONITE-THURSDAY, OCTOBER 12-1 p.m.
936 DEWEY(off Packard)
' INFO, CALL: 761-3161
Sponsored by CHAVURAT ALIYA and ISRAELI STUDENTS UNION

FRI.-SAT., Ott. 13-14
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$1.25 cont.
FRIENDS OF NEWSREEL
Midwest premiere: Dec. 8-9
NY EROTIC FILM FESTIVAL If

II1

But White House press secretary e1tna etook ecove t1antdpa
Ronald Ziegler said "we have no stillmoet eel intothe
indicationothe talks will be ex- where th communists appar
tendedethanotheristday."r
tende anoher ay."were well entrenched in bun
Ziegler would not say why Kis-
singer's departure - originally and fighting holes.
scheduled for Tuesday but reset Even so, field reports said,
for yesterday - had been de- Saigon troops lost two men k
layed again. and five wounded.
But there were indications that Nobody knew howmany r
Kissinger might confer w i t h Vietnamese troops held Xom
French officials upset because but it has become - perhaps
their diplomatic mission in Hanoi cause of its location on the
was severely damaged during a way - the focal point of the
U. S. air raid yesterday. week's fighting in the region
The unprecedented extension of north of Saigon.
Kissinger's 19th round of secret One of the farmers from th
Paris talks to four days had stir- gion, Nguyen Nghi, was a
red speculation that a break- whether he thought the cu
through toward a settlement might negotiations in Paris meant p
be near. But officials refused to was coming soon. "Too r
give any encouragement to such fighting. I am too busy tot
theories, about that," he said.
S. bombs hit French
(Continued from Page 1) Navy, and Marine planes
have happened," Vogt told The: been making 300 or more st
Associated Press: "We'll just have a day against North Vietnam.
to go into it and see what hap- Laird said the bombings v
pened. We're going to take a good continue despite the delicate1
hard look at it." tiations in Paris between F
Secretary of State William Kissinger, U.S. presidential s
Rogers messaged his regrets at ity adviser, and the North
the wounding of Susini to the namese.
French foreign minister, Maurice Laird's remarks came d
Schumann. the same 55-minute news c
President Georges Pompidou af- ence in which he described
firmed that the damage to the George McGovern's plan for
French mission was caused by U.S. ing the Vietnam war as a
bombs and called the incident "a out to communism.
deplorable act." McGovern has said that he'
Meanwhile, in the United Na- suspend the bombing and a
tions, Sweden accused the United South Vietnam on Inaugu
States of "indiscriminate bombing Day if he were' elected andN
of central Hanoi" and U.N. Secre- withdraw all U.S. forces v
tary-General Kurt Waldheim called 90 days.
hits on the French diplomatic mis- "Never before has a canc
sion there "regrettable." for major political office advo
Yesterday's U.S. air attacks in a program of unconditional
the Hanoi area were the first in render," Laird said. "That's e
several weeks although Air Force, ly what that program is."

ured
town
*ently
rkers
, the
killed
North
Suoi,
s be-
ihgh-
past
just

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Mic'igan. Notices should be
sent in TYF-sWRITTEN FORM to
409 E. Jefferson, before 2 p.m. of
the dry preceding publication and
by 2 p.m. Friday for Saturday and
Sunday. Items appear once only.
Student organization notices are
not acceptejl for publication. For
more information, phone 764-9270.
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 12

e re- DAY CALENDAR
asked Student Services Policy Board Meet-
rrent ing: vice Pres. Conf. Rm., 3rd floor,
peace Union, 9-11 am.
Mental Health Research Inst.: S.
much Brodsky, Univ. of Alabama, "The Psy-
think chologist in Criminal Justice; Chang-
ing Systems and Challenging Myths,"
1057 _MHRI, 3:45 pm.
W. S. Woytinsky Economics Lecture:
A. M. Rivlin, Brookings Inst., "Social
Policy: Federal Options for the Fu-
have
trikes THE QUE
would,
nego-
Henry
secur-
Viet-

ture," Rackham Amph., 4 pm.
Botany Seminar: B. J. D. Meeuse,
Univ. of Washington, Seattle, "Bio-
logical and Biochemical Investigations
on the Voodoo Lilly and Other Aer-
oids," 1139 Nat. Sci., 4 pm.
Residential College Renaissance Dra-
ma Film: "Throne of Blood," Japan,
126 Residential Col., 4 pm.
Computers, Fortran IV, and MTS:
B. Carnahan, "The IBM 360/67 Com-
puting System and MTS," Nat. Sci.
Aud., 7:30 pmn.j
University Players: Farquhar's "The
Beaux Strategem," Lydia Mendelssohn,
8 pm.
Music School: M. Ronish, flute hon-
ors recital, Sch. of Mus. Recital Hall,
8 pm.
Music School: Stanley Quartet,'
Rackham Aud., 8 pm.
International Social \Hour: Rive
Gauche, 1024 Hill St., 8 pm.

Shop
Fol Ietts

State Street at North U.
Thursday:
East Quad, Green Lounge
8:00 P.M.
Stockwell,
Stockwell Lounge
8:00 P.M.
Monday:
South Quad,
Dining Room 112
8:00 P.M.

-v

VN ONFootball Ticket
Exchange
for Michigan-Michigan State Game
Get the ticket you want
Friday, Oct. 13 from 1-5 p.m.
n the Michigan Union lobby

A

STION OF

.

mwmm.mmmm.'

i

uring
)nfer-
Sen.
end-
sell-
would
id to
[ration
would
within
didate
cated
sur-
exact-

THURSDAY, 7-8 P.M.
wcbn-fm 89.5
on
"TALKBACK"
a new audience-participation
show of involvement
GET THE REAL DEAL
DIAL 761-3500

LOOK INTO THESE:
NEAR EAST 201:
Introduction to World Religions:
Near East
MWF 2-3
RELIGION 211:
Mormonism
Tues., Fri. 10-11:30
RELIGION/LINGUISTICS 429:
Buddhism
MWF 10-11
RELIGION AND SOCIETY 455:
(to be arranged)
(these courses are not listed in time schedule)
Contact STUDIES IN RELIGION-
1053 LSA--FOR FURTHER INFORMATION

I
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C rz a_
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CANDIDATE FOR U.S. SENATE

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