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October 07, 1972 - Image 3

Resource type:
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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-10-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Saudy Otoe ,17

'THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three.

Saturday, October 7, 1972 THE MICH!GAN DAILY F'age Three

A FRANKOVICH PRODUCTION
ARE FREE r_
GOLv*DIE 4WN
and nroducng
RIfrom PITRSPl
&L COLUMBIA PICTURES
Now At The MICHIGAN THEATRE.
UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT
TONIGHT:
DELIVERANCE
(formerly 8th Day)
SUNDAY: 9:30-2:00
OPEN JAM SESSION
5:00-2:00
208 W.Huron
LUNCHES DAILY
BAGELS FOR BRUNCH BUNCH STRIKES AGAIN!
Prof. Oliver Wendell Holpes
History Dept. U-M
"Jews, Intellectuals & Politics:
w -
Europe from 1870 to the 1920's"
Sunday, October 8
1429 HILL-663-4129
Bagels & Lox, 11 a.m. Talk, 11:30 Hillel Social Hall

Israel orchestra

By DONALD SOSIN
Israel Philharmonic Orchestra, Zu-
bin Mehta, conductor, Thursday, Oc-
tober 5, 8:30 p.m. Hill Auditorium
Choral Union Series of the Univer-
sity Musical Society.
MOZART-Symphony No. 34 in C,
K. 338; Stravinsky-Symphony in
Three Movements; Dvorak-Sympho-
ny No. 7 (2) in D minor, Op. 70.
After Thursday night's specta-
cular concert by the Israel Phil-
harmonic under their musical ad-
visor, Zubin Mehta, there can
be no doubt that this ensesmble
ranks among the finest orches-
tras in the world. I first heard
the group five yearsagomand
more recently saw their film of
Mahler's Das Lied von der Erde
at the festival of Leonard Bern-
stein films in Washington. And
although I was impressed, I had
reservations about the tone qual-
ity and matters of precision.
These reservations were swept
away Thursday in a performance
that was the finest heard so far
this season.
Mehta, who last appeared with
his other full-time orchestra, the
Los Angeles Philharmonic, has
matured greatly as a conductor
and musician, and met the de-
mands of a challenging program.
Neither the Mozart nor the
Stravinsky symphonies which
made up the first half of the pro-
gram, are familiar concert fare.
The Mozart is a curiosity in three
movements, and offers little
whistleable material. This is not
to say that is it poorly written,

for the orchestration is
color contrasts, and the
are clear, but it is not an
near the level of his later
Mehta, nevertheless, ma
perb music out of it, takin
mous care with the fragi
movement, during which
was not a sound from th
ence, which let loose with
ry of coughs and whisper
it was over.
Stravinsky's Symphony it
Movements does not eas
its way into the heart of
tener. Written in 1945-
work exhibits little of the
in the Symphony in C, wh
ceded it, or The Rake's Pr
completed three years la
The outside movements
sentially rhythmic in th
ner of The Rite of Spring
the inner Andante, foresha
Rake, is lyrical and ev
orous.
The orchestra performi
liantly. The strings, a tot,
mogenous sounding sectio
always on top of the qui
thmic changes that perva
work, and sensitive to ea(
ute gesture of Mehta's. Br
winds were occasionallyl
hind the strings, but one
felt a lack of fullness
sound.
The Dvorak Symphonyl
a rousing ovation, but IE
it less than the other two
both from a musical sta

. .in superb!
rich in and an interpretive one: whether
forms Brahms' Third inspired Dvorak
iywhere or not, the symphony rarely rises
works. to the level of the Brahms, al-
ade su- though the Scherzo is terrific.
ig enor- And the playing was sporadical-
le slow ly imprecise, which actually did
h there little harm to the thick textures,
ie audi- though.
a flur- Mehta responded to the ova-
rs when tion with two encores; the first
was "Tybalt's Death" from Pro-
r Three kofiev's Romeo and Juliet, which
the lisd evidently not too many people
48, the were familiar with, as it was re-
humor ceived rather coolly. It's one of
ich pre- my all-time favorites, though,
rogress, and I was overjoyed to hear it.
ter. The crowd was more enthusiastic
are es- about the overture to Verdi's La
e man- F
, while Forza del Destino, which has
adowing some nice tunes but palls beside
ven hu- the Prokofiev for orchestration
and intensity. But everyone at
d bril- least had something to cheer
yn, were about, and the cheering was well-
ck rhv- deserved.

Daily Photo by DAVID MARGOLICK
Israel Philharmonic conductor Zubin Mehta

des the
ch min-
ass and
lost be-
never
in the
brought
enjoyed
pieces,
ndpoint

music

Huzzah for Di' Oyly Carte!

to0

0

TONIGHT!

r u L'URE CALEIN DAR
WEEKEND BARS AND MUSIC-Bimbo's, Gaslighters (Fri.,
Sat., Sun.) 50c cover; Bimbo's on the Hill, Long John
Silver (Fri., Sat.) no cover; Blind Pig, Boogie Brothers
(Fri., Sat.) 75c cover, classical music (Sun.) no cover;
Del Rio, Armando's Jazz Group (Sun ) no cover; Golden
Falcon, Stanley Mitchell and the People's Choice (Fri.,
Sat., Sun.) $1.00 cover; Lum's, R.F.D. Boys (Fri., Sat.)
$1.00 cover; Mackinac Jack's, Mo-jo Boogle Band (Fri.,
Sat.), Orchid Wally (Sun.) 75c cover; Mr. Flood's Party,
Diesel Curves and Dangerous Smoke (Fri., Sat.) 75c
cover; Odyssey, Deliverence (Fri., Sat.) $1.00 cover;
Pretzel Bell, Lincoln County Ramblers (Fri., Sat.) 75c
cover; Rubaiyat, Iris Bell Adventure (Fri., Sat., Sun.) no
cover.
MUSIC-The University Musical Society presents The World
of Gilbert and Sullivan by the D'Oyly Carte Opera Com-
pany of London tonight at 8 in the Power Center, tic-
kets $6, $5, $4; Cheech and Chong perform their topical
comedy tonight at 8 in Hill Aud., backed by the Persua-
sions, an a capella group; tickets $2, $3, $3.50, $4; Steve
Goodman performs tonight at the Ark at 9, $2; Betsy
Beckerman and Friends sing at Rive Gauche at 9 tonight,
50c.
FILMS-Cinema Guild presents Jodorowsky's El Topo tonight
at 7, 9:05 in Arch. Aud., Cinema II features Warhol's
Women in Revolt at 7, 9 tonight in Aud. "A", Angell Hall;
Mad Dogs and Englishmen at 9 tonight in Bursley Hall's
West Cafeteria.
DRAMA-Ann Arbor Civic Theater continues its production
of Forty Carats tonight at 8 in Lydia Mendelssohn The-
atre; EMU Players' production of George Bernard Shaw's
Man and Superman tonight at 8 in Quirk Aud.
ART-The Union Gallery, first floor Union, opens its doors
this afternoon between 12 and 5.
Information concerning local cultural happenings to
appear in The Daily Culture Calendar should be sent to the
Arts Editor c/o The Daily.

By DONALD SOSIN
The world of Gilbert and Sullivan,
with alumni of D'Oyly Carte Opera
Company. Friday, Oct. 6, 8 p.m.
Power Center. Choice Series of Uni-
versity Musical Society.
Five D'Oyly Carte stars and
theireaccompanistbrought the
Gilbert and Sullivan world in all
its splendour to the Power Cen-
ter last night, and treated us to
scenes, duets, trios, and what-
have-yous from ten operettas.
What was most wonderful
about the evening was the extra-
ordinarily high level of musician-
ship evident in all. Sullivan's
music can stand on its own, and
Gilbert's lyrics can provoke
laughter even without the tunes
-with these intelligent musi-
cians, the level of charm was
multiplied a hundredfold. Ensem-
bles such as the "Madrigal" from
Mikado and the Scene from Act
two of Yeoman of the Guard,
were ample proof of Sullivan's
true genius for this stuff that
dreams are made on.
And nightmares, too, as John
Cartier showed in his tongue-
t w i s t i n g "Lord Chancellor's
Nightmare" from Iolanthe. Car-
tier's antics, appropriate to each
of the roles baritones occupy in

the Savoyard plays, kept the
amusement level high, and Don-
ald Adams, interpolating anec-
dotes and comments about his
portliness between solos from
lolanthe and Mikado, got his
share of chuckles.
The tenor, Thomas Round, won
a large hand for his rendition of
"A wandering minstrel" and in
between songs offered more
anecdotes.
The two ladies, Angela Jenkins
and Jean Temperley, had a love-
ly duet from the rarely heard
"Utopia, Ltd." Jenkins has a
beautiful high soprano voice
which she was able to show off

to good effect in "Poor wander-
ing one" from Pirates of Pen-
zance and while Temperley's
impressive vocal abilities were
displayed in "The Fairy Queen's
3Song" and "Silvered is the
Raven Hair."
Accompanist Clive Timms de-
serves a special round of ap-
plaaise; his playing kept things
going smoothly throughout; if
there were a few missed notes,
I grant him them gladly: the
music is far from easy, and his
skill and sensitivity were a bless-
ing to the show.
Good fun awaits all who attend
tonight's performance.

A

ARTS

VIOLIN FOR KIDS
Suzuki way:* A family affair

CHEECH & CHONG and THE PERSUASIONS
TONIGHT 8 p.m. Hill Aud. $2-3-3.50-4.00
RESERVED SEATS. Tickets are selling very fast now so don't
wait any longer. Michigan Union 11 -6 today, Sat. 1 -4 p.m.;
Salvation Records 11-9 p.m.; also at the door 5:30 p.m. on.

By MELANIE GRANFORS
After World War II, the Japa-
nese musician Suzuki taught mu-
sic to -"bring happiness to the
children of the bomb."
Today the Ann Arbor Suzuki
Institute uses his philosophy to
stimulate children to learn to
play the violin.
Under the direction of Celia
Weis,, children are helped to ex-
plore music in a relaxed and
friendly environment.
"The process is a family af-
fair," says Weiss, a University
graduate who studied with Suzu-
ki in Japan. "One parent must
attend the sessions andthe older
children are models for their
younger brothers and sisters.
Peer group association ism ex-
tremely important."
There are currently 48 children
in the program. Ages vary from
three years to junior high level.
On Saturdays parents and chil-

dren attend the environmental
class. This is a crucial part of
the experience. Older children
set the example by practicing as
a group. No one participates un-
til he is ready. If the students
are not playing violin, they can
watch the others, play with toys
or eat lunch.
"After a while everyone is
practicing," Weiss says. Thepar-
ents give encouragement by
clbpping and smiling.
The idea is to get the student to
appreciate violin music first. If
children are three or four when
they begin, they may not read mu-
sic until they are seven or eight.
"The atmosphere is free, but
not permissive,' says student as-
sistant Jim McCullough. "We're
friendly and casual. When chil-
dren lose interest, they stop.
Then it is the others who encour-
age them to go back."
4 n

The Saturday sessions are sup-
plemented by weekly private
lessons as soon as students are
ready. These range in length
from half a minute to half an
hour.
"We wait until the child asks
us for a lesson," Celia explains.
She often goes to the students'
home and lets neighborhood kids
come and watch.
Because Suzuki's method is an
ongoing process, parents must be
able to help the children at home.
Celia teaches parents during the
week. They learn basic violin
skills and explore the psychologi-
cal aspects of the program.
"Without parental co-operation
the method is a failure," she
says.
Though Celia specializes in vi-
olin, the method has been applied
to cello, piano and non-musical
fields. She stresses that the goal
is to promote motivation and in-
terest in her students, not just
skill.
As Vivaldi's A minor concerto
drifts from Saturday morning's
classroom, one realizes she is
highly successful.

tonight
6:00 2,4,7 News
9 Partyline
50 Startrek
6 The Explorers
6:30 2,4 News
56 The Just Generation
6,10 News
7:00 2 Truth or Consequences
4 The Explorers
7 Michigan Outdoors
9 Movie \- "Lost Command,
(1966) French Algerian con-
flict explored. Anthony Quinn.
50,6 Hee Haw
56 Family Game
10Rollin' on the River
7:30 2 Young Dr. Kildare
4 The Adventurer
7 Requiem for Uncle Tom
56 NET Playhouse
10 Police Surgeon
8:00 2 All in the Family
4,10 Emergency!
7 Alias Smith and Jones
50 Roller Game of the Week
6 All in the Family
8:30 2,6 Bridget Loves Bernie
9:00 2 Mary Tyler Moore
4 NBC Movie
"Marooned," '70, Spacecraft
and its crew are stranded in
thin air due to a misfiring
of rockets during re-entry.
Gregory Peck, David Janssen.
7 Streets of San Francisco
56 on Location
6 Mary Tyler Moore
10 NBC Movie
9:30 2 The Bob Newhart Show
9 Document
6 Bob Newhart
10:00 2 Mission Impossible
7 The Sixth Sense
9 News
50 Lou Gordon
56 Hollywood Television Theatre
6 Mission Impossible
10:15 9 East Side, West Side
10:30 9 East Side, West Side,
11:00 2,7,6 News
11:30 2 Movie
"The Sands of Kalahari," '65,
Airplane c r a s h survivors
struggle for their lives on
desert, Stuart Whitman, Sus-
annah York.
4 News,
7 Movie
Double feature: "Robin and
the Seven Hoods" (1964). Two
rival Chicago gangs battle for
supremacy. Frank Sinatra
Dean Martin, Sammy Davis,
Jr.; "Oceans 11" (1960). Five
Las vegas casinos are in the
center of robbery plot. Frank
Sinatra, Dean Martin, Sammy
Davis Jr.
9 Movie
"Shane," '53, Epic western
about a feud between cattle-
men and .homesteaders. Alan
Ladd, Jean Arthur. Daily
recommended. ;
50 Movie
"Them," (B) '54, Mysterious
killings on the Mojave Desert
investigated by state police.
James Whitmore, James Ar-
ness.
6 Movie "The Marriage-Go-
Round," '61, Susan Hayward,
James Mason
12:00 4 Tonight
1:00 50 The Baron
1:30 2 Movie
"Charlie Chan at the Opera,"
(B) '37, Warner Oland, Helen
Wood. Music is an overture to
murder

y.

/

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