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September 07, 1972 - Image 43

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-09-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Thursday, September 7 1972

THEWICHIGAN DAILY

rage Seven

Thursday, September 7, 1972 THE MICHIGAN DAILY rage ~ever~

m7usical ac.

By DONALD SOSIN
Starting with the Glee Club's
performance at the President's
Welcome this fall, the campus
will once again be plunged into
a whirlpool of musical activities.
The University Musical So-
ciety (UMS) will be bringing
in an exciting series of concerts
to campus this season; orches-
tras, soloists, chambers music
groups, guitarists, and dance
companies from all over the
world will appear in Ann Ar-
bor's many auditoriums. Tic-
kets are now on sale at the So-
ciety's office in Burton Tower.
If you'-ve seen the UMS bro-
chures and are dying to see the
New York Philharmonic, the
Guarneri Quartet, Jacqueline
Du Pre or Marcel Marceau,
among others, but you're low on
cash, there's still hope. You can
sign up to usher. Watch the
Daily for announcements.
Last year the School of Music
presented over 250 concerts, al-
most all of which were free. Up-
coming months will bring pro-
grams of virtually every sort,
with performances by the Uni-
versity's two bands, choral en-
sembles and faculty' members.
Students, many of them pre-
paring for concert careers, will
also be giving recitals as part
of their degree requirements.
Be your own critic and discover
the Horowitz or Sills of tomor-
row.
You'll be able to hear music
written five hundred years ago
played and sung by the out-
standing Collegium Musicum.
(If you play an ancient instru-
ment like the recorder, sack-
but, shawm or crummhorn, you
can join the group for credit.)
And there's m u s i c written
last week, this week and tomor-
row at Composers Forum and
Contemporary Directions pro-
grams.
If you'd rather play or sing
than listen, most groups on
campus have open auditions.
The world renowned Glee Club
accepts men only, but the
Choral Union and Arts Chorale
are co-ed. The former performs
the Messiah in December and
participates in concerts with
visiting orchestras during the
year. The Arts Chorale chooses
from such works as Brahms'
Requiem, C a r m i n a Burana,
Brubeck's Light in the Wilder-
ness, and gives two concerts 'a
year. The group is open to non-
music majors, and carries an
hour of credit, as do the other

vocal groups. The University
Choir is for music majors, as is
the Chamber Choir. Both per-
form a variety of works each
semester.
All University orchestras and
bands are open to qualified mu-
sicians of either sex. The
Marching Band, after much
heated debate, now allows fe-
males to audition.
No women. however. have y-t
met the rigorous demands of
the group. Other ensembles in-
clude the Symphony and Jazz
Bands.
Most concerts, including those
by th, School of Music .and
UMS, are announced in the
Daily Bull tin. The School of
Music Bulletin is available in
its building on North Campus
as well as at the UMS offie.
Upstairs in Burton Tower, is the

famous Baird Carillon, on
which the University carilloneur
and his students serenade Ann
Arbor with Bach, Bacharach, or
Go Blue. Visiting hours are
posted in the Tower.
Concentus Musicus and Ars
Musica are two independent
groups that perform Baroque
music in Ann Arbor. Watch for
announcements of their con-
certs.
In the realm of music theater,
the School of Music presents an
opera each semester. These
have recently moved from tiny
Lydia Mendelssohn Theater to
the new Power Center.
Mendelssohn, however, is per-
fectly suited to the delight-
ful productions of the Gilbert
and Sullivan Society. (G&S).
One operetta is staged each se-
mester, and tryouts are open to
all.
American musical theater is
represented by 14 U S K E T
Michigan Union Show, Ko-
Eds Too) which serves up top-
notch versions of shows like
Funny Girl and My Fair Lady
ocer a year. Open tryouts.
The orchestra for both G&S
and MUSKET includes both
non-music and music students
who, when they're not rehears-
ing these shows, read through
works in the orchestral reper-

"Starting with the Glee
Club's performance at the
President's Welcome t h i s
fall, the campus will once
again be plunged into a
whirlpool of musical activi-
ties . . . Ann Arbor is, in
short, a music lover's para-
dise. Make the most of it."
toire. They call themselves, not
surprisingT", the University
Theater U:chestra, and wel-
come new members.
The Ann Arbor Civic Theater
is mostly theater, but also ven-
tures into musicals, such as the
recent smash, Once Upon
a Mattress. Casts and crew are
Civic Theater members.
The Bach Club will sooner or
later catch your eye with one
of its ubiquitous, zany posters
(many now collectors' items)
and meets Thursdays in South
Quad to hear live music and
eat homemade food.
Other tidbits:
You can't perform rock music
for credit, but you can study it
in a new course, Music History
460 - European and American
folk and pop. '
If your ethnomusicological in-
terests lie farther east, there is
the Javanese gamelan which
studies and performs the clas-
sical music of Jaya, and also a
group for Japanese music.
Pianos are available in most
dorms; the Union has a couple
which you can use after leav-
ing your I.D. at the desk. School
of Music practice facilities are
limited to music students.
The School of Music library
has 50,000 volumes of books
and music, 14,000 records, and
a listening room where you can
enjoy them. The Undergraduate
Library has its own listening
room and a smaller record col-
lection.
Best bets for classical sheet
music are at The Music Shop
and Hadcock's, both a stone's
throw from Hill Auditorium.
Classical records can be found
at Liberty Music Shop .and Dis-
~F~~a ~-.

count Records. Prices are gen-
erally lower at Discount, but
Liberty has by far the wider se-
lection.
FM radio listeners can de-
pend on a fair amount of clas-
sical music throughout the day
The University station (WUG-
M 91.7) offers live and prere-
corded concerts from around
campus as well as reeordings
and lectures.
WKAR (90.5) performs a sim-
ilar service for Michigan State,
plays classical records, some
jazz, and tapes of concerts by
the Cleveland and Boston Sym-
phony Orchestras. It occasion-
ally has an all-night program,
but otherwise the air waves are
devoid of classics after '1 a.m.
WDET (101.7) is a public
radio station in Detroit owned
by 'Wayne State University. Its
range of music is diverse and
always interesting; it also airs
special features, live concerts,
and information about Detroit
cultural events.
Ann Arbor is, in short, a mu-
sic lover's paradise. Make the
most of it.
You'll Find \
M'THIGAN
Beer Mugs Glass-
ware O.Playing
Cords @ Bookends
Ash Trays 9 Swea'
Shirts S T-Shirts
Jackets @ Caps
Hats@" Six Footers
Gloves @ Blankets
Car Robes
Banners
Pennants
RINGS AND
JEWELRY
,T

local usici ns
getting together

By JILL LAWRENCE
Ann Arbor musicians who are
having trouble finding each
other may soon have access to
a local music switchboard.
Co-ordinator Alice Blue com-
mented on the lack of commun-
ication between local musicians.
"I was in Ann, Arbor for three
months before I found some-
body to jam with," she said.
"This is especially true during
the winter, because of the isola-
tion."
The music switchboard would

act as a clearinghouse,, provid-
ing a means for musicians to
get in touch with each other.
"Our main instrument will be
a telephone," Blue said, "once
we find somewhere to work
from. That's our major prob-
lem at the moment."
The switchboard would be
more comprehensive than the
musicians' union. which lists
only names, addresses, phone
numbers, and instruments. Be-
sides this information, the
switchboard would offer details

concerning experience, skills,
equipment, transportation, and
areas of musical interest,
Blue has been involved with
two similar operations in other
cities.
In Dallas, she worked for a
switchboard comparable to the
University's 76-GUIDE, which
covered everything from trans-
portation to housing.
"There was so much musical
information being exchanged
that we decided to branch off
and open a separate switch-
board for music," Blue explain-
ed.
The music switchboard in
Dallas is still going, as is an-
other in San Francisco.
Blue plans to file papers to
make the Ann Arbor switch-
board a non-profit, agency. It
would support itself through
teaching, benefits, and other
means.
"Mydream is to have a stu-
dio. " Blue confesses. "The cost
of recording holds backs crea-
tive people. It could be so much
cheaper and easier."

w

r. e., " ll ?? A-VI3ar

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