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October 06, 1972 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-10-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Poge Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, October 6, 1972

Page Sx THE iCHIG- -AI-

S

WOULD RECOGNIZE CHINA
New internationalism' called
for by candidate McGovern

NEW YORK (A) - Democratic
Presidential nominee George Mc-
Govern yesterday delivered a
broad outline of his foreign policy
goals while attacking President,
Nixon's policy as one of "uncon- ;
scious isolationism."
The South Dakota senator said
he would as president extend dip-
lomatic recognition to The Peo-
ple's Republic of China, a step'
Nixon has said will not happen in
the foreseeable future, despite his
own summit diplomacy in Peking.
As always, McGovern vowed to
withdraw immediately from the
war in Indochina. Later, in a
speech before the City Club of
Cleveland McGovern gave his firs+
detailed account of his foreign
policy intentions toward the rest of'
the world.
". .In many ways," he said,
"the foreign policies of the present
administration are isolating us."
McGovern said the United States
is isolated from allies and trading
partners by "six gun diplomacy
and failure to consult," and from
the developing nations by attitudes
that favor big business there.
"We are isolated from reality
by the insistence that tough talk
and big Pentagon budgets are
somehow synonymous with national
manhood," *cGovern said.
I suspect that we must
reject this unconscious isolationism
in favor of a new internationalism
based not only upon our vital in-
terests, but also upon the kind of
nation we can and should be," he
said.
McGovern thus sought to take
the foreign policy. offensive against
Republicans who have charged that
his proposals for defense cuts,
withdrawal from Indochina andI
U.S. troop reductions in' EuropeI
add up to a new isolationism.
He said "American's New Inter-I
nationalism in the 1970s" must be
supported by a strong national de-
fense, but one free of waste. But
he rejected as "a naive .delusion"
the concept of a balance of powerI
to preserve peace.
"Let us have the defense we
need," McGovern said. "But let us
not permit the insatiable appetite
of our military to replace our good
sense, and undermine the pros-
pects for reduction in the balance
ACCUTRON
REPAIR
SEIKO WATCHES
Campus Jewelers
719 &. usirltys65s4355
In Ann Arbor Sinse 1952

of nuclear terror."
He said under Nixon "we are be-
coming a second-rate nation in theI
terms that will really count in the
1970s' " in international economics,
and cooperative aid for the de-
veloping nations.
McGovern issued his 13-page for-
eign policy manifesto as he cam-
paigned in New York and Cleve-
land.l
He began it with an appearance
b e f o r e Democratic nationalities

groups in New York City, saying j
it is the Democrats, not Nixon nori
the Republicans, who have his-
torically encouraged openness in
U.S. immigration policies.
McGovern did his vote-hunting
W e d n e s d a y with a half-dozen
speeches in Buffalo and New York
City, campaigning among blacks
and leaders of organized labor ap-
pearing before a Liberal Party
dinner inNew York that drew
more than 1,500 people.

FOREST
FIRES BURN
MORE
THAN
TREES
'C*

$1.00

From the studio that gave you'
rissey, starring Candy Darling,
A "madcap soap opera," rated
of anX.

"Trash," produced by Paul Mor-
Holly Woodlawn, Jackie Curtis.
a "big fat, juicy, glorious honey

CINEMA IIcPRESENTS:
(Please note schedule change)
FRIDAY--SATURDAY--SUNDAY
ANDY WARHOL'S
WOMEN IN REVOLT

$1.00

IoRGt'OTTE N IWORKS
Nobody knows how old the Forgotten Works are, reaching as they
do into distances that we cannot travel nor want to.
TRAVEL THE FORGOTTEN WORKS
U IN ANTIQUE VILLAGE
410 N. 4TH AVE., ANN ARBOR 769-1227
OPEN SAT.-SUN. 9-6
VICTORIAN CLOTHING, HATS, LAMPS, CAPES, COSTUMES,
e MIRRORS, WIERDNESS FROM THE PAST.

"Outrageous--uproarious--hilarious"-L. A. Times
AUD. A, ANGELL HALL 0 7 and 9 o'clock

M"

Nixon backs off on tax

pledge, blare
From Wire Service Reports#
WASHINGTON-President Nixon
yesterday backed off his campaign
pledge not to increase taxes, say-
ing that "congressional overspend-
ing" now threatened that promise.
In a wide-ranging news confer-
ence, he also shrugged off op-
ponent George McGovern's cor-
ruption charges and said the Viet-
nam peace talks are in a sensitive
stage.
Nixon would not predict when or
if the war might end, but said:
"If we can make the right kind
of settlement before the election,
we will make it."
Nixon, as expected, said his per-
sonal campaigning would be limit-
ed but he will make a nationwide
radio address-paid for by his
campaign committee-on the tax
issue tomorrow night.
His vow that he would not in-
crease federal taxes unless "con-
gressional overspending" forced
him to do so was disputed by Uni-
versity Prof. Paul McCracken, once
the top presidential economic ad-
viser. McCracken said Wednesday
he thought there was a "less than
an even chance" that Nixon.could
live up to his promise.
Fielding questions for 40 min-
utes in his first news conference
in five weeks, the President:
-Said he is "not going to dig-
nify" McGovern's charges of cor-
ruption in his administration by

ies Congress

Sporty Miss J strides the campus
and corridor in suede.
A. Thick sole, heavy heel, contrast
stitching. Navy with red stitching,
brown with yellow. $10.
B. Waffle-tread shoe boot,
added top, navy,
own. $12.

SHOP THURSDAY & FRIDAY UNTIL 9:00 P.M.

responding to them, adding that
"I think the responsible members
of the Democratic party will be
turned off by this kind of cam-
paigning . . ."
-Vowed "there will be no presi-
dential tax increase" but said he
would forego campaigning and
stay close to the White House "un-
til that very great danger of a tax
increase caused by congressional
overspending is met and defeated."
-Said efforts to reach a Vietnam
settlement will not be affected by
the Nov. 7 election. He said the
bombing and mining of North Viet-
nam would continue "until we get
some agreements on the negotiat-
ing front."
-Defended as "good for Amer-
ica" the Soviet wheat deal but
pledged'to take action if investiga-
tion shows grain dealers made
illegal profits.
-Again claimed that he had no ' Read and Use
personal knowledge of the alleged
bugging of Democratic headquar- D i Cla sifieds
ters in the Watergate office build-
ing, and repeated that none of his - ---- --
present White House aides was
involved.

coIb on
LIBERTY AT MAYNARD

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i

APPLY NOW
Positions now open on
LSA Student Judiciary
SIGN UP, 3M, Michigan Union
h
DEADLINE: OCTOBER 6
+$9 .t"{ :.° '. , ?: .,q a" i' I ;. } K ^f'

U

Indochina Peace Campaign Presents:
THE ENDLESS WAR:
Viet Nam and the American Empire
Tues., Oct.10 7:30 p.m. Hill Aud.
Speakers:
DAVID DELLINGER-recently returned from Hanoi.
VIETNAMESE STUDENTS:
Tran Khahn Tuyet-of Saigon now with the Indochina
Center.
David Truong-son of former presidential candidate
Truong.
Dinh Dzu-imprisoned since 1967.
POW Mothers-including Virginia Warner.
ALSO:
GUERRILLA THEATRE-The Street Corner Society.
LOCAL SUPPORTING ORGANIZATONS:
Emergency Conference Committee
Human Rights Party
McGovern for President
Operation Reparations
Program for Social & Ed. Change
People's Coalition for Peace & Justice
Rainbow P. P.
Viet Nam Veterans Against the War
DONATION AT THE DOOR
Fird hnwinne FNIIL SSWAR FILM SERIES

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