100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 06, 1972 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-10-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page. Two-

i

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

t-riday, October 6, 1912

* l

a' 1K.

Welfare
WASHINGTON OP) - In the U.
S. Senate yesterday, work on the
Social Security - welfare reform
bill neared completion, as a
number of important amend-
ments were tacked on to the
measure. .
Senators voted to protect re-
cipients of the 20 per cent So-
cial Security increase from
boosts in public housing rents or
loss of food stamps and commo-
dities.
This was provided in an
amendment of Sen. Walter F.
Mondale, (D-Minn.), adopted to
the Social Security-welfare re-
form bill.
Mondale said thousands of old
persons had found the 20 per
cent boost, first received in
checks this week, to be "a cruel
hoax."
It increased their income lev-
els to the point, he said, that
many of them suffered loss of
Medicaid coverage, or a loss of

bill nears OK

old-age assistance benefits, or
an increase in public housing
rents or loss of food stamps and
commodities.
The Mondale proposal provides
for disregard of the 20 per cent
Social Security increase in fig-
uring income levels for public
housing or eligibility for the food
benefits.
The Senate last week adopted
an amendment to prevent the
older persons from having a cut
in their assistance benefits or
loss of Medicaid because of the
recent 20 per cent boost.
The Mondale amendment was
one of many proposals acted on
a day after settlement of wel-
fare reform. The Senate set
aside three welfare plans, includ-
ing President Nixon's Family
Assistance Plan, in favor of a
test of each program.
At his news conference yester-
day, President Nixon said he will
try again in 1973 to get his plan

adopted. He said he would not
approve any programs that
would add to welfare rolls and
said proposals "by our oppon-
ents" would do that.
One of the amendments the
Senate adopted was one of Sen.
John V. Tunney (D-Calif.), that
would broaden greatly the in-
come tax deduction allowed par-
ents for expenses of child care
so that they would hold jobs.
The upper House defeated 45-
33 an attempt by Sen. Edward
M. Kennedy (D-Mass.), to strike
out of the bill a repealer of the
provision in present law which
requires all states to provide
to their poor persons a compre-
hensive range of medical serv-
ices by 1977.
Also rejected 40 to 33 was a
Kennedy amendment to knock
out of the bill a repealer of the
provision in present law requir-
ing the states not to cut back
on its Medicaid expenditures.

MICHIGANUNION
BILLIARDS
'Till 1 a.m. Fri. & Sat.
Special Rates 1-6 p.m. Sundays
Billiard Exhibition Mon.
4 p.m. & 6:45 p.m.
STEVE MIZERAK, JR.
Ballroom-admission free
Thurs., Oct. 12-7 p.m.-9 p.m.
FREE INSTRUCTIONS
DON'T MISS THIS
RARE TIDBIT!
FRIDAY
HERE COMES
MR. JORDAN
Director ALEXANDER HALL,
1944
With CLAUDE RAINS,
E.E. HORTON
Fantasy of a prizefighter who is
accidentally sent to Heaven be-
fare his time and must find a
new body to occupy. .
PLUS:
Foreign.Press Awards
with JAYNE MANSFIELD
SAT./SUN.:
Famous violence:
EL TOPO

EMU Players
-PRESENTS-
George Bernard Show's
delicious comedy

I

Tues. thru Sun., Oct. 3-8 at 8 pm.
QUIRK AUDITORIUM
For Reserved Seats at $2.00, dial 487-1221 between
12:45 and 4:30 p.m. weekdays and 7:00 p.m. an
performance nights.

I U. ...

NOW SHOWING!
BEST-SELLER
BECOMES
SPECTACULAR
SPY-THRILLERI

FOLLOWS INVASION:
Tanzania, Uganda find
settlement over disputes:

J

At State and Liberty
DIAL 662-6264
OPEN 12:45
SHOWS AT 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 PM
Todays Super Powers
confront each other
in the suspense
adventure of the year.

AP Photo
Speaking to the issue
Democratic presidential nominee George McGovern outlines his
foreign policy positions before a Cleveland audience yesterday. See
story, page six.
CLOT URE FAILS:
Consumer.billkled
enate fbser

MOGADISHU, Somalia (P) -
Tanzania and Uganda have an-
nounced settlement of a dispute
that began when Uganda's presi-
dent, Gen. Idi Amin, accused Tan-
zania of invading his country.
Amin has recently been in the
center of African controversy, a
situation stemming from his policy
of deporting East Asians living in
Uganda, and his remarks support-
ing Hitler's extermination of Jews
during World War II.
A joint communique issued here
last night said details of the agree-
ment would be made public later.
Foreign Ministers Wanume K1-
bedi of Uganda and John Malecela
of Tanzania negotiated the settle-
ment. Kibedi said the occasion was
a great day in the history of Af-
rica. He said the enemies of Africa
had wanted the conflict to esca-
late into full-scale war.
President Mohamed Siad Barre
of Somalia, who organized the
two-day peace conference, said the
dispute stemmed from a "colonial

conspiracy" to weaken African
unity. He warned that similar "in-
trigues" could be expected in the
years to come.
Uganda announced Sept. 17 that
more than 1,000 Tanzanian troops
had invaded Ugandan territory.
Fighting was reported in the bor-
der area for several days. Reports
said the invaders were supporters
of' Miltpn Obote, the deposed
Ugandian president who lives in
Tanzania.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0562. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier (campus area); $11 local mail
(in Mich. or Ohio); $13 non-local mail
(other states and foreign).
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus'
area) ; $6.50 local mail (in Mich. or
Ohio); $7.50 non-local mail (other
states and foreign).

Oct. 6--8 p.m.
SOLD OUT
BOWEN FIELD HOUSE
E.M.U.-YPSILANTI
TICKET OUTLETS: Ypsilanti--
McKenny Union; Huckleberry
Party Stare (2872 Washte-
now); DEARBORN-Ron Henry
Music (Tel-Ford Plaza) ; ANN
ARBOR -Music Mart (State
St.), WAAM Radio Broadcast
House; DETROIT-Hudson's.
COMING ATTRACTIONS
Chuck Berry
Oct. 27
5th Dimension
Nov. 10
Mail Orders send self-addressed
stamped envelope to M.E.C.,
Office of Student Life, 3rd Floor,
McKenny Union
E'
MA

ARCH ITECTU RE
AUDITORIUM
7 & 9 P.M.-75c

III

.11

G

WASHINGTON A - Senate
backers of a consumer agency billc
yesterday failed for a third time
to halt an administration support-1
ed filibuster against the measure,1
and said4 their bill; for practical
purposes, is dead for the year.
The vote on cloture was beaten.
again by a minority of senators'
since the 52-30 tally was three
,'short of the necessary two-thirds
present needed to close off debate.E
Technically, the measure es-1
tablishing a consumer protection
agency had a chance since it1
could be called up again during
the rush to adjournment - the
.best estimate of that being Oct.
14.
However, one sponsor of the:
bill said that its chances of be-
ing called up, subject to further
filibuster, are remote. Another
senator said, it would take a mira-
cle, "and I don't see a miracle."
With the administration's bless-
ing, the House had already passed
its VMsion of the consumer ager-
cy bill, weaker than the Senate
draft.
Under the Senate bill, the Con-
sumer agency's lawyers could act
as .full parties in regulatory ag-
ency cases, presenting their own
evidence* ;and cross - examining

witnesses. They could appeal de-
cisions in the courts..
The House -bill would confine
the lawyers to filing briefs in court
presenting the agency's view of a
case:
Backers of the Senate bill said
such agencies as the Interstate
Commerce Commission, the Civil
Aeronautics Board and the Fed-
eral Trade Commission are sup-
posed to protect the public inter-
est but have been dominated by
business interests.
BOOGIE BAND }
217ASH 2PRMt-2AM

,....

CHARLIE CHAPLIN FESTIVAL
Winner of this year's Special Academy Award
A TWO WEEK LAUGH ORGY!
* NOW SHOWING*

10

i

Chae C~hain
"MODERN TIMES"
with Paulette Goddard

8

Thur.-6:30-8:00-9:30
Fri.-6:30-8:00-9:35-11:05
Sat- 1:45-3:15-4:45-6:15-
7:50-9:35-11:00
"CITY LIGHTS"
Sun., 8th thru Thur., 12th
matinees Monday, 9th-Columbus Day
"THE GREAT DICTATOR"
Fri., 13th thru Tue., 17th

FRIENDS OF NEWSREEL presents

I

UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT'
featuring
DELIVE RANCE
(formerly 8th DAY)
WED.-SAT., 9:30-2:00
OdV44eV 208 W. HuronI
LUNCHES DAILY
wE

,I

IKE & TINA TURNER
WILSON PICKETT

Tonight

SANTANA-ROBERTA FLACK
VOICES OF EAST HARLEM
$.75 reparations discount

7:15-9:00-10:45

MOD. LANG. BLDG.

$1 cont.

SAVE WITH SP
PRICED SERI[
see all 3 classics f
NOW ON

ECIAL LOW- 141Hill $NET
ES TICKETS
or ONLY $4.50
J SALE
I75'1-9'700

STUDENTS! DON'T MISS!
SEE ALL 4 PLAYS
FOR ONLY $8.25!

I ,

1

,:
I ,4i'

The natural food
drink that's
DEVILISH LY REF RESHING!
A blend of pure orange juice, sugar,
and oMur own super secret powder.
1237 S. University

A COMMUNITY
BENEFIT DANCE
CO-SPONSORED BY
The Human Rights Party
AND
The Ann Arbor Gay
Liberation Front
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 6, 1972

ow PAM anauTijo ctupaw

I

I

8-12 p.m.
Women's Athletic Buildings

II

,

- . <t' -;:. *L.. LI,.:..>s..:.L.__ _._ - aw e

I ]

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan