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October 05, 1972 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-10-05

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, Octbber 5, 1972

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, October 5, 1972

v

BAGELS FOR BRUNCH BUNCH STRIKES AGAIN!

FROSH STARS

Bagels & Lo

Grifin

blazes

to

Prof. Oliver Wendell Holmes
History Dept. U-M
"Jews, Intellectuals & Politics:
Europe from 1870 to the 1920's"

1429 HILL-663-4129
x, 11 a.m. Talk, 11:30 Hillel

Social Hall

NEW SU PELCO CATALOG AVAILABLE
CHROMATOGRAPHY SUPPLI ES,
LIP I D STANDARDS,
PESTICIDE STANDARDS,
HAMI LTON SYR INGES,
CH ROMOSORB,
SILYLATI NG REAGENTS
and NOW
FREE PHONE CALLS WITH A DIRECT TELEPHONE LINE TO
SUPELCO, INC.
Bellefonte, Pa. 16823
CALL: ENTERPRISE 6811
Meanwhile, see our daily ads in the classified section of this
newspaper starting next week.

By MARK RONAN
Ohio State University, the
realm of the long revered full-
back and his stultifying cloud of
dust broke with the past and
bowed to a must. An uncommon
entity known as Archie Grif-
fin, who is both a freshman and
a halfback, lightened the hearts
of the old Scarlet and Grey last
Saturday as he broke a long es-
tablished school yardage mark
and pulled the Buckeyes to a 29-
14 victory over the Tar Heels of
North Carolina.
Perhaps, the simple fact that
Griffin is only a three day vet-
eran in the wonderful world of
higher education renders his
feat all the more astonishing. In
restrospect, however, A r c hie
Griffin does not appear such an
unlikely hero.
While a senior at another Co-
lumbus, Ohio school of lesser re-
nown, Eastmoor High School, he
scored 70 points and collected
more than 1700 yards. His aver-
age carry was slightly less than
eight yards. In 1971, both the A.
P. and the U.P.I. polls named
him "Ohio State Back of the
Year."
R u d y Hubbard, backfield
coach for the Buckeyes, ex-
plained that the Buckeye coach-

ing staff do not feel that a per-
iod of seasoning or development
must be observed before a player
can see action. Rather, the per-
formance of a player in practice
is of greater concern, for those
who do the best earn the oppor-
tunity to play.

back in the reigning fig'
the hierarchy of the Ohio
bacld ekfiand Ohio State
heavily on its full-backj
Iowa game.
However, the Bucks wi
considerable assistancec
chie Griffin, found it extr
productive to fake to th
back, and give the ball
halfback and watch him
North Carolina was pr
to deal with Woody's full
but the likes of Archie

record
ure n tno gr- t a surprise. By making
State !,se of its halfbacks, Ohio State
relied begin to roll at its accustomed
in the pa-e. North Carolina could only
concur with Woody's assessment.
th the "Griffin was the catalyst for the
of Ar- victory, no doubt about it. He
remely gave the team the spark we
e full- needed in the first period."
to the
go.t After that the Tar Heels might
epared only warn that when you see
b k Archie coming leap into the

Though only one of two fresh-
men on the varsity, it was pos-
sible for Griffin to merit a chance
to play and in, at least the es-
timation of Hubbard, Griffin had
proven himself.
Coach Woody Hayes later stat-
ed, "I hesitated to put him in,
but our backfield coach, Rudy
Hubbard, insisted he was ready."
So he was. When Griffin en-
tered the game on the fourth
series of downs, the Buckeyes
trailed North Carolina 7-3 and,
by and large, had floundered
about the field miserably. Pos-
CCini dLiiI n.d nL 4 -

vaces,
proved

nearest bunker.

Four piots rehired
in American League
From Wire Service Reports The Tigers also said they have
As the baseball season drew to rehired their four coaches for the
a close and dust of all the division- 1973 season. They are first base
al races cleared, four managers of coach Dick Tracewski, third base
American League teams were re- coach Joe Schultz, pitching coach
hired yesterday. The lucky field Art Fowler and bullpen coach

AP Photo
OHIO STATE'S ARCHIE GRIFFIN was named AP back of the
week along with Dan,Howard of Navy, as both players rushed for
239 yards in last week's contests. Griffin was also named Big Ten
player of the week.

I

ATTENTION
ELIGIBLE VOTERS OF ANN ARBOR
Friday, October 6, 1972, at 8:00 p.m. is the
'deadline set by law for persons to register to vote in
the November 7, Presidential Election.
IF YOU ARE ALREADY REGISTERED TO VOTE IN
ARBOR, BUT HAVE MOVED WITHIN THE CITY, YOU
SHOULD FILE A CHANGE OF ADDRESS WITH THE CITY
CLERK'S OFFICE AT CITY HALL. A CONVENIENT WAY
FOR VOTERS TO FILE A CHANGE OF ADDRESS IS TO
MAIL THEIR VOTER I.D. CARD TO THE CITY CLERK'S
OFFICE WITH THE CHANGE OF ADDRESS INFORMA-
TION FILLED OUT IN THE SPACE PROVIDED ON THE
CARD. CHANGES OF ADDRESS MUST BE RECEIVED BY
OCTOBER 6, 1972.
Voter registration or change of address activities may be
accomplished by coming in person to the City Clerk's Office
Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. The Clerk's
Office will also be open on Saturday, September 30, 8:00 a.m.
to 5:00 p.m. and on Friday, October 6, until 8:00 p.m. The
Clerk's Office is located on the Second Floor of City Hall,
100 N. Fifth Avenue.
In addition to City Hall, deputy voter registrars will be
available to process new voter registrations and changes of
address at the following locations and times:
1. Thurston School, 2300 Prairie Street: October 2-October 6,
from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
2. Angel School, 1608 S. University Avenue: October 2-Octo-
ber 6, from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
3. Stone School, 2800 Stone School Road: October 2-October 6,
from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
5. Mack School, 920 Miller Ave.: October 2-October 6, from
S:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
6. Pittsfield School, 2543 Pittsfield Blvd.: October 2-October
6, fron\ 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
7. Northside School, 912 Barton Dr.: October 2-October 6,
from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
8. Peace Neighborhood Center, 1121 N. Maple Rd.: October
2-October 6, from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
9. Fire Station No. 3, 2130 Jackson Ave.: October 2-October
6, from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
10. West Stadium Shopping Center at Stadium Pharmacy,
1930 W. Stadium Blvd.: October 2-October 6, from 5:00
p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
11. Lamp Post Plaza Shopping Center at the Wrigley Store,
2366 E. Stadium Blvd.: October 2-October 6, from 5:00
p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
12. Maple Village Shopping Center at the Mall Area next to
Maple Village Pharmacy: October 2-October 6, from 5:00
p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
13. Forest Hills Community Center, 2351 Shadowood Dr.:
September 25-September 29, and October 2-October 6,
from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
14. Ann Arbor Public Library, 343 S. Fifth Ave.: Monday
through Friday until October 6, from 1:00 p.m. to 8:00
p.m. and on Saturday, September 30, from 1:00 p.m. to
6:00 p.m.
15. University of Michigan Campus location at the "Fish-
bowl" (between Angel-Mason Hall) on the Diagonal, de-
pending upon the weather, Monday through Friday until
October 6, from 9:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
16. Summit Medical Center, 704 Spring St.: September 25-
September 28, and October 2-October 5, from 9:00 a.m. to
12:30 p.m., 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. to 9:00
p.m. and September 29 and October 6, from 9:00 a.m, to
12:30 p.m. and 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
17. Campus Corner Drugstore at the intersection of Packard
and State: September 25-September 30, and October 2-
October 5, from 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. to
9:00 p.m. and October 6, from 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
and 7:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
18. Alice Lloyd Hall, 100 S. Observatory St.: September 27-
September 29, and October 2, from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
19. Mosher-Jordan Hall, 200 S. Observatory St.: October 3-
October 6 from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
20. Mary Markley Hall, 1425 Washington Heights: September
25-September 29, and October 2-October 6, from 5:00 p.m.
to 8:00 p.m.
21. Bursley Hall, 1931 Duffield St.: September 25-September
29, and October 2-October 6, from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
22. West Quadrangle, 541 Thompson St.: September 25-Sep-
tember 29, from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
23. South Quadrangle, 600 E. Madison St.: October 2-October
6, from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.'
24. East Quadrangle, 701 E. University Ave.: September 25-
September 29, from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
25. Village Corners at intersection of S. Forest and S. Uni-
versity Avenues: October 2-October 6, from 10:00 a.m. to
5:00 p.m.

teit of trplayinigneamuan- majors were Billy Martin of the 'Charlie Silvera.
tity of playing time accumulated Eastern Division champion Detroit Less than 12 hours after being
in the only previous game, Tigers, quiet Eddie Kasko of the eliminated by the Detroit Tigers
Griffin touched the ball for the Boston Red Sox, Cleveland Indian in the next to last game of the
first time in a college contest, Ken Aspromonte, and Frank Quilici American League East race, Kasko
and in the seventeen minutes of of the Minnesota Twins. was handed a new two-year con-
play he registered, emerged with
239 yards, a school record, and Bob Lemon had become the first tract.
the status of Wizard of Awes, casualty of the annual managerial Kasko, 42, was written off in
first class, extraordinaire. firing game on Tuesday as he was many circles as the Red Sox got
given the ax by the Kansas City off to a bad start this season. At
In the course of one afternoon, Royals. the All-Star break, he appeared
the freshman had surpassed the It was an apparent change of headed for the managerial dump-
Buckeye yardage mark estab- mind by Martin to accept the one- ing ground.
Pittsburgh in 1945 by ten yards. year extension. He had said Tues- However, with key moves and
PIn exceeding Cline's a94ylis.h day night, after the Tigers clinched other division contenders faltering,
Ient exriedin Cattsaccompish- the divisional title by beating Bos- he led the Red Sox to first place,
ment, Griffn attacked the line ton 3-1, that he had already re- a spot relinquished only Monday
27 times and never suffered any fused such an offer. night to the Tigers.
sort of loss. During his blitz, he When Martin joined the Tigers Quilici was named to manage
managed to tally one touchdown. two years ago, he was given a two- the Twins on July 6, the same day
Possibly it is of less interest year pact. After the 1971 season, it that Griffith fired Bill Rigney, and
that Griffin pyed as a half- was extended through the 1973 he was given a one-year contract.
season. This is the second one- The Twins were 36-34 under Bill
back. Yet, sentiment, if nothing year extension of his contract, r,- Rigney and 41-43 under Quilici.
more, maintains that the full- portedly in the $65,000-a-year range. Ken Aspromonte was rehired for
at least two more seasons with the
Indians.
The salary was not announced
immediately, although club offi-
cials said it was a "multi-year
Acontract."
SUNDAY OCT. 8 Indian coaches Joe Lutz and
Warren Spahn were also rehired.
Palmer Field-4:30-6:80 However, the Indians said in the
!a ie~e d~:O 48 brief announcement that coach
hogdohid ts 50IBobby Hoffman "will not be re-
egrogs , p-ou- c turning." No reason was given.
RANGF WAS A MILE
MEET THE CANDIDATES DOVER, England (R) - A 1,700-
year-old tower that carried a cata-
Bullard Fojtik pult capable of hurling blocks
Sallade Fulton nearly a mile has been uncovered
Armstrong Goddard byarcheologists working in the
center of this English Channel
IN CASE OF RAIN-OCT. 15, 1972 port.
paid political advertisement The tower, probably once 25 feet
d trshigh, dominated the 'wall of a
Roman shore fort.

4

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