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October 01, 1972 - Image 10

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-10-01

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Doge Ten

I"HE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, October 1, 1972

Page Ten LHE MICHI3AN DAILY ~unday, October 1, 1972

NixOn signs weapons
limitation resolution

WASHINGTON (A) - Hailing it
as a step reducing the danger of
war, President Nixon yesterday
signed a congressional resolution
approving his agreement with So-
viet leaders limiting the two super-
powers' offensive nuclear arsenals
for five years.
"This is not an agreement which
guarantees there will be no war,"
the chief executive said. ". . . This
is a beginning of a process that is
enormously important that will
limit now and, we hope later, re-'
duce the burden of arms, and
thereby reduce the danger of war."
Sitting beneath a crystal chan-
delier in the White House Treaty
Room, Nixon affixed his signature
to the document as 11 congression-
al leaders and six administration
officials looked over his shoulders.
He had reached the interim
agreement in Moscow summit
talks four months ago and, along
with a treaty limiting deployment
of defensive missiles, sent it to
Capitol Hill for approval.
There the Senate, after protract-
ed debate, added an amendment
stipulating that there should be
equality in the number of weapons
in any future treaty governing the
two countries' offensive arsenals.
The agreement gives the Soviet
Union a numerical advantage in
land-based and submarine-launch-
ed missiles - a fact that prompt-
ed Sen. Henry Jackson (D-Wash.),
to press for the amendment.
It urges Nixon to seek a treaty
that "would not limit the United
States to levels of intercontinental
strategic forces inferior to the lim-
its provided for the Soviet Union."
Negotiations on a permanent.
treaty - the so-called SALT 2
talks are scheduleddto begin this
fall in Geneva. Nixon said nothing
about the new round of talks in his
signing ceremony comments, but
IMPROVE WORKING
CONDITIONS
LONDON (i') - "The Director,"
journal of the Institute of Direc-
tors, says thateunnecessary status
divisions between office and fac-
tory workers must be broken
down. It says it is time the "land-
scaped office" with plants, acous-
tic screens, air-conditioning and
subtle lighting and color was
brought to the work bench.

he has cautioned repeatedly in the
past that "these negotiations are
not going to be easy."
The Kremlin announced Friday
that Soviet leaders had ratified the
second major product of the Mos-
cow summit - the treaty limiting
antiballistic, or defensive, missiles.
The Senate approved the defensive
weapons treaty in August, but
Nixon had withheld action required
to complete the ratification process
pending approval of the offensive-
" weapons agreement.
A White House spokesperson
said the President would act soon
to complete the defensive-weapons
treaty ratification but gave no fur-
ther details.
In his remarks Nixon said he
signed the executive agreement,
although he was actually signing
the resolution which approved the
agreement he had signed in Mos-
cow.
Nixon said he selected the small,
green-walled chamber in his sec-
ond-floor living quarters for the
signing because 'it has "a very
special significance."
He told the congressional leaders
that the chamber served as a
Cabinet room from the presidency
of Abraham Lincoln until 1902 and
that the treaty ending the Spanish-
American War was signed there.
As he signed the resolution, Nix-
on commented, "I think what is
particularly pleasing - pleasing in
the sense of how our system works
- is that this agreement has had
bi-partisan support in the fullest
sense."

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GRADS and UNDERORADS

I

PRESIDENT)
Treaty Room
approves the
weapons.

AP Photo
NIXON signs the SALT bill yesterday in the ornate
of the White House in Washington. The resolution
interim U.S.-Soviet agreements to curb offensive

I

McGovern rated 30-16h.
On liberal voting r nc r
MINNEAPOLIS (P) - Demo- er of the votes.
c r a t i c presidential candidate Three Democrats - Sens. Gay-
George McGovern tied for 30th lord Nelson of Wisconsin, Philip
among the 100 U. S. Senators in Hart of Michigan, and Walter Mon-
liberal ratings released yesterday dale of Minnesota, received the
by Americans for Democratic Ac- highest liberal ratings for voting
tion (ADA) on 14 key votes of the the ADA position on 13 of the 14
92nd Congress. key votes.
McGovern was one of seven Twenty - three senators, includ-
senators to vote the liberal ing Republican National Chairman
position on eight of the 14 issues, 1 Robert Dole of Kansas, received
but the ADA added that the can- zero rat-scgs by the ADA, meaning
didate had announced or paired they voted against the liberl po-
sition on all the measures.
for the liberal position on four oth- - -

~RT77,NT
AS YOU LIKE IT!
NEW TRENDS FOR 1972
TRIMS-- SHAGS
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* 615 E. Libert

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including
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On the House side, some 28 con-
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111 congressmen voted against the
ADA position on all of them.

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GUILD HOUSE-802 Monroe
- MONDAY, OCTOBER 2 -
SPECIAL NOON LUNCHEON-35c
LIZ TAYLOR
Democratic Candidate for Woshtenaw County Commissioner
"WHY YOU SHOULD ELECT ME"

ATTENTION
ELIGIBLE VOTERS OF ANN ARBOR
Friday, October 6, 1972, at 8:00 p.m. is the
deadline set by law for persons to register to vote in
the November 7, Presidential Election.,
IF YOU ARE ALREADY REGISTERED TO VOTE IN
ARBOR, BUT HAVE MOVED WITHIN THE CITY, YOU
SHOULD FILE A CHANGE OF ADDRESS WITH THE CITY
CLERK'S OFFICE AT CITY HALL. A CONVENIENT WAY
FOR VOTERS TO FILE A CHANGE OF ADDRESS IS TO
MAIL THEIR VOTER I.D. CARD TO THE CITY CLERK'S
OFFICE WITH THE CHANGE OF ADDRESS INFORMA-
TION FILLED OUT IN THE SPACE PROVIDED ON THE
CARD. CHANGES OF ADDRESS MUST BE RECEIVED BY
OCTOBER 6, 1972.
Voter registration or change of address activities may be
accomplished by coming in person to the City Clerk's Office
Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. The Clerk's
Office will also be open on Saturday, September 30, 8:00 a.m.
to 5:00 p.m. and on Friday, October 6, until 8:00 p.m. The
Clerk's Office is located on the Second Floor of City Hall,
100 N. Fifth Avenue.
In addition to City Hall, deputy voter registrars will be
available to process new voter registrations and changes of
address at the following locations and times:
1. Thurston School, 2300 Prairie Street: October 2-October 6,
from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
2. Angel School, 1608 S. University Avenue: October 2-Octo-
ber 6, from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
3. Stone School, 2800 Stone School Road: October 2-October 6,
from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
5. Mack School, 920 Miller Ave.: October 2-October 6, from
5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
6. Pittsfield School, 2543 Pittsfield Blvd.: October 2-October
6, from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
7. Northside School, 912 Barton Dr.: October 2-October 6,
from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
8. Peace Neighborhood Center, 1121 N. Maple Rd.: October
2-October 6, from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
9. Fire Station No. 3, 2130 Jackson Ave.: October 2-October
6, from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
10. West Stadium Shopping Center at Stadium Pharmacy,
1930 W. Stadium Blvd.: October 2-October 6, from 5:00
p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
11. Lamp Post Plaza Shopping Center at the Wrigley Store,
2366 E. Stadium Blvd.: October 2-October 6, from 5:00
p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
12. Maple Village Shopping Center at the Mall Area next to
Maple Village Pharmacy: October 2-October 6, from 5:00
p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
13. Forest Hills Community Center, 2351 Shadowood Dr.:
September 25-September 29, and October 2-October 6,
from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
14. Ann Arbor Public Library, 343 S. Fifth Ave.: Monday
through Friday until October6, from 1:00 p.m. to 8:00
p.m. and on Saturday, September 30, from 1:00 p.m. to
6:00 p.m.
15. University of Michigan Campus location at the "Fish-
bowl" (between Angel-Mason Hall) on the Diagonal, de-
pending upon the weather, Monday through Friday until
October 6, from 9:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
16. Summit Medical Center, 704 Spring St.: September 25-
September 28, and October 2-October 5, from 9:00 a.m. to
12:30 p.m., 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. to 9:00
p.m. and September 29 and October 6, from 9:00 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. and 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
17. Campus Corner Drugstore at the intersection of Packard
and State: September 25-September 30, and October 2-
October 5, from 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. to
9:00 p.m. and October 6, from 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
and 7:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
18. Alice Lloyd Hall, 100 S. Observatory St.: September 27-
September 29, and October 2, from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
19. Mosher-Jordan Hall, 200 S. Observatory St.: October 3-
October 6 from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
20. Mary Markley Hall, 1425 Washington Heights: September
25-September 29, and October 2-October 6, from 5:00 p.m.
to 8:00 p.m.
2L Bursley Hall, 1931 Duffield St.: September 25-September
29, and October 2-October 6, from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
22. West Quadrangle, 541 Thompson St.: September 25-Sep-
tember 29, from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
23. South Quadrangle, 600 E. Madison St.: October 2-October
6, from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m,
24. East Quadrangle, 701 E. University Ave.: September 25-
September 29, from 5:00 p.m, to 8:00 p.m.
25. Village Corners at intersection of S. Forest and S. Uni-
versity Avenues: October 2-October , from 10:00 a.m. to
5:00 p.m.
YOU ARE ELIGIBLE TO REGISTER TO VOTE

Everyone

Welcome!
GRAD
COFFEL
H OU R
Wednesday, Sept. 20
8-10 p.m.
West Conference
Room, 4th Floor
RACKHAM
OUTSIDE ON THE TERRACE

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Fun, Food, People
NEW PEOPLE WELCOME!

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AMERCAN AIRLINES
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