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September 29, 1972 - Image 10

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-09-29

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Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN[ [GAILY

Friday, September 29, 1972

Poge Ten2====5 iHE MCHIGNILJILY rida, Setembr 29 197

300 RAIDS:
SAIGON (41)-- American war-
planes blasted North Vietnam's
transportation system and mili-
tary depots with more than 300
raids Wednesday for the third suc-
cessive day, but in South Vietnam
fighting remained in a general
lull, military spokesmen reported
yesterday.
North Vietnam reported that
U.S. warplanes "wantonly" rock-
eted the outskirts of Hanoi yes-
terday, "causing many civilian
casualties, including children."
The official Vietnam News Ag-
ency also said that on Wednesday
U.S. planes 'barbarously bombed
the Dong Hoi provincial town, the
outskirts of Haiphong" and eight
North Vietnamese provinces.
Attention in Saigon was diverted
from the war to political develop-
ments' that touched off specula-

trikes de pots
tion that two days of secret meet- nam war.
ings in Paris between U. S. presi- However, the Washington Star-
dential adviser Henry Kissinger News reported the talks have
and the North Vietnamese had pro- reached the "very serious" stage
duced a settlement of the war. and Kissinger is likely to return to
The Saigon government moved Paris for more talks next week.
quickly to quash the reports, con- Analysts said they had no evi-
fiscating two Vietnamese-language dence to tie the six-day battlefield
newspapers that reported agree- lull to the political developments.
ment had been reached on a cease- They reported that intelligence in-
fire and President Nguyen Van dicates that none of 14 North Viet-
Thieu would resign. A third news- namese Divisions in South Vietnam
paper, known to reflect the of- has made any moves to withdraw
ficial views of the presidential pa- from the country, but rather are
lace, said there has been no change using the lull to regroup and re-
in the U.S. and South Vietnamese supply for a new wave of attacks.
positions and that if there is any Increased terror, sniper and roc-
change at this time, it is on the ket and mortar attacks are antici-
North Vietnamese side.sn pated in the Saigon region in the
North Vietnam's spokesmen in weeks prior to the U. S. presi-
Paris indicated yesterday that Kis- dential election in November.
singer had failed to make any
progress toward ending the Viet- One terror attack was reported
t d nin A d

Major crime up one per cent;
loincrease in 12 years

4

S
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C
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7
1
1

Transfer of wealth
plan lacks support

WASHINGTON (P) - A plan
to transfer wealth from the rich
to poor nations through the in-
ternational monetary system is
failing to gain much enthusiasm
from the world's top financial of-
ficials.
The idea is being pushed by
developing nations at the annual
meeting of the International
Monetary Fund, (IMF), but the
industrial nations have gener-
ally shown coolness to the plan.
The United States is one of
those countries which is express-
ing reluctance, fearing that such
a proposal could present great
monetary problems later on.
The scheme is intricate, but it
revolves around a central idea:
giving the poor nations more of
the new international reserve as-
sets created by the IMF than
their economies would normally
justify.
Thus, with more reserves on
hand, the developing countries
figure that they could attract
more development, having the
national wealth to finance it.
Since 1970 the IMF has created,

under international rules, a new
kind of money out of thin air-
Special Drawing Rights (SDRs)
or "paper gold." These are dis-
tributed to countries according
to the size of their economies-
the rich always getting more
than the poor.
As the finance ministers dis-
cuss monetary reform, they are
talking about expanding the role
of paper gold to make it the
standard of value for all of the
currencies of the world.
With this in mind, the develop-
ing countries see its as an oppor-
tune time to change the formula
for distributing this new kind of
international money so that they
can get a bigger share.
The strongest supporters of the
idea among the industrial coun-
tries areGreat Britain and Bel-
gium. France also has express-
ed its support for the concept,
but it fears that it may mean
that too many SDRs would be
created.
West Germany is against the
proposal.

yesieraay morning.A grenaae was
hurled at a South Korean jeep in
the Chinese quarter of Saigon. It
fell into the street, killing a Viet-
namese civilian and wounding four,
the Saigon command reported. The
terrorist escaped.
Many of the 300 air strikes re-
ported across North Vietnam on+
Wednesday were concentrated one
one major target, a sprawling
military storage complex 84 miles
northwest of Hanoi, which U. S.
sources said served as a transship-
ment point for war materiels flow-
ing southward from China.
In the first attack of the war
against the depot, Air Force F4
Phantom jets from three different
bases in Thailand dropped 2,000-
pound laser-guided bombs and con-
ventional 500-pound fragmentation
bombs on the target, the Air Force
reported.
Pilots reported they destroyed or
damaged more than half of the
70 buildings in the complex. Num-
erous storage buildings were left
in flames, the pilots said.
It was one of the biggest coor-
dinated raids carried out since the
resumption of full-scale bombing
across North Vietnam last April 6.

I
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WASHINGTON W) - Serious cludes burglary, larceny over $5
crime in the nation rose one per and auto theft.
cent during the first six months During the first six months, forc-
of this year, the lowest January- ible rape increased by 14 per cent,
June rate increase reported by the aggravated assault 6 per cent and
FBI since it began issuing quarter- murder 1 per cent but robbery of-
ly reports in 1946, the Justice De- fenses declined 4 per cent.
partment announced yesterday. In the property crime category,
Atty. Gen. Richard Kleindienst burglary increased 4 per cent and
said the increase in both violent larceny $50 and over was up 1
and property crime during the first per cent while auto theft decreased
six months of 1972 was one per 4 per cent.
cent. During the same period in Cities having 100,000 or more in-
1971, violent crime increased by habitants reported a 2 per cent
11 per cent and property crime decrease in the volume of Crime
rose 6 per cent, he said. Index offenses while suburban law
The figures for the months Jan- enforcement agencies reported a
uary through June arecontained S5per cent increase and crime in
in the FBI's Uniform Crime Re- the rural areas was up 7 per cent,
port, which is compiled by volun- according to the report.
tary reports from 5,606 local, coun- Geographically, t h e western
ty and state law enforcement ag- states reported a rise of 2 per
encies. cent in serious crimes while the
Sen. George McGovern, Demo- northeastern, north central and
cratic presidential candidate, said southern states each reported in-
in a statement that the statistics creases of one per cent.
tell only part of the story, that In the announcement, Kleidienst
for every reported crime there are said: "Seventy-two of the major
two more that are unreported. cities in the country recorded an
Kleindienst said in a speech pre- actual decrease in serious crime
pared for delivery last night in in the first six months of 1972 com-
Los Angeles that the spreading pared to 53 cities showing de-
use of data processing is increas- creases in the same period of 1971
ing the reporting of crimes. and 34 such cities in 1970."
The FBI report divides serious Kleindienst, repeating the com-
crime into two categories - vio- ments he has made while speak-
lent, which includes murder, forc- ing across the country on behalf
ible rape, robbery and aggravated of the Nixon administration, said
assault; and property, which in- violent crimes in Washington,D.C..
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were down 21 per cent from the
comparable period of a year ago.
"In the only major city which
is under federal control and di-
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tration's anticrime initiative, we
are seeing significant progress," he
said.
The crime reporting system in
Washington was criticizedrecent-
ly by two analysts who said part
of the widely reported drop in the
District rate may be attributed to
a wholesale downgrading of lar-
ceny and burglary statistics by po-
lice. The allegations were denied.

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UNIONGALLR
1st Floor-Mich. UnionJ
OINGSHOW
FRIDAY, SEPT. 29j
7-10 p.m.
REFRESHMENTS
MUSIC: The Paulus Hofhaimer Ensemble
WED--SAT AT 9:00
tAND HIS I)
SUN.-TUES. AT 9:00
SWvvOLFGANG'(I

ATTENTION.
ELIGIBLE VOTERS OF ANN ARBOR
Friday, October 6, 1972, at 8:00 p.m. is the
deadline set by law for persons to register to vote in
the November 7, Presidential Election.
IF YOU ARE ALREADY REGISTERED TO VOTE IN
ARBOR, BUT HAVE MOVED WITHIN THE CITY, YOU
SHOULD FILE A CHANGE OF ADDRESS WITH THE CITY
CLERK'S OFFICE AT CITY HALL. A CONVENIENT WAY
FOR VOTERS TO FILE A CHANGE OF ADDRESS IS TO
MAIL THEIR VOTER I.D. 'CARD TO THE CITY CLERK'S
OFFICE WITH THE CHANGE OF ADDRESS INFORMA-
TION FILLED OUT IN THE SPACE PROVIDED ON THE
CARD. CHANGES OF ADDRESS MUST BE RECEIVED BY
OCTOBER 6, 1972.
Voter registration or change of address activities may be
accomplished by coming in person to the City Clerk's Office
Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. The Clerk's
Office will also be open on Saturday, September 30, 8:00 a.m.
to 5:00 p.m. and on Friday, October 6, until 8:00 p.m. The
Clerk's Office is located on the Second Floor of City Hall,
100 N. Fifth Avenue.
In addition to City Hall, deputy voter registrars will be
available to process new voter registrations and changes of
address at the following locations and times:
1. Thurston School, 2300 Prairie Street: October 2-October 6,
from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
2. Angel School, 1608 S. University Avenue: October 2-Octo-
ber 6, from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
3. Stone School, 2800 Stone School Road: October 2-October 6,
from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
5. Mack School, 920 Miller Ave.: October 2-October 6, from
5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
6. Pittsfield School, 2543 Pittsfield Blvd.: October 2-October
6, from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
7. Northside School, 912 Barton Dr.: October 2-October 6,
from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
8. Peace Neighborhood Center, 1121 N. Maple Rd.: October
2-October 6, from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
9. Fire Station No. 3, 2130 Jackson Ave.: October 2-October
6, from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
10. West Stadium Shopping Center at Stadium Pharmacy,
1930 W. Stadium Blvd.: October 2-October 6, from 5:00
p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
11. Lamp Post Plaza Shopping Center at the Wrigley Store,
2366 E. Stadium Blvd.: October 2-October 6, from 5:00
p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
12. Maple Village Shopping Center at the Mall Area next to
Maple Village Pharmacy: October 2-October 6, from 5:00
p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
13. Forest Hills Community Center, 2351 Shadowood Dr.:
September 25-September 29, and October 2-October 6
from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
14. Ann Arbor Public Library, 343 S. Fifth Ave.: Monday
through Friday until October 6, from 1:00 p.m. to 8:00
p.m. and on Saturay, September 30, from 1:00 p.m. to
6:00 p.m.
15. University of Michigan Campus location at the "Fish-
bowl" (between Angel-Mason Hall) on the Diagonal, de-
pending upon the weather, Monday through Friday until
October 6, from 9:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
16. Summit Medical Center, 704 Spring St.: September 25-
September 28, and October 2-October 5, from 9:00 a.m. to
12:30 p.m., 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. to 9:00
p.m. and September 29 and October 6, from 9:00 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. and 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m:
17. Campus Corner Drugstore at the intersection of Packard
and State: September 25-September 30, and October 2-
October 5, from 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. to
9:00 p.m. and October 6, from 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
and 7:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
18. Alice Lloyd Hall, 100 S. Observatory St.: September 27-
September 29, and October 2, from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
19. Mosher-Jordan Hall, 200 S. Observatory St.: October 3-
October 6 from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
20. Mary Markley Hall, 1425 Washington Heights: September
25-September 29, and October 2-October 6, from 5:00 p.m.
to 8:00 p.m.
21. Bursley Hall, 1931 Duffield St.: September 25-September
29, and October 2-October 6, from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
22. West Quadrangle, 541 Thompson St.: September 25-Sep-
tember 29, from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
23. South Quadrangle, 600 E. Madison St.: October 2-October
6, from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
24. East Quadrangle, 701 E. University Ave.: September 25-
September 29, from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
25. Village Corners at intersection of S. Forest and S. Uni-
versity Avenues: October 2-October 6, from 10:00 a.m. to
5:00 p.m.

I

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