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September 27, 1972 - Image 9

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-09-27

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Wednesday, September 27,,1972

THE MICHIGAN -DAILY

Page Nine

Wednesday, September 27, 1972 THE MICHIGAN 'DAILY Page Nine~

0 ffensi ve
By BOB McGINN
When a person enters the football wing
of the Athletic Building, he is over-
whelmed with the professional atmos-
phere. The carpet is plush, 'the rooms
uncluttered. It is comparable to walking
into a doctor's office.
The play of Michigan's football teams
since Bo Schembechler arrived reflect
this "no-nonsense" philosophy. And, spe.
cifically, so does the offensive line.
"Our chief goal is to avoid the bad
play," says Larry Smith, one of a pair
of Wolverine offensive line coaches.
"We just will not tolerate missed as-
signments. If they miss a block be-
cause they're .beaten physically, that's
one thing. But if a defender is left in
the hole untouched, that's quite an-
other."
Smith feels that it takes two full sea-
sons for a freshman lineman to learn
Michigan's system. And the biggest part
of the problem is mental. A look at the
Wolverines' ready play list for UCLA
last week revealed approximately 30
running plays, each- of which has four
of five variations.
If the lineman could simply memorize
each play and his blocking assignment
against every defense, his task would
be fairly straightforward. But modern
defenses are complicated, and by stunt-

line do
ing, blitzing, and looping they confuse
their opponents.
So blocking is not just hitting the man
opposite you when the ball is snapped.
Instead, it's a constant battle of coor-
dinated, split-second adjustment among
the six individuals up-front.

e

sn't play
size of their offensive guards. For
dears,, most schools used the basic 5-2
Oklahoma defense. In this set-up, no
linemen are head-up on the guards, only
smaller linebackers. Thus, one's offen-
sive guards could afford to be small
and quick since they didn't have to

"The day of the big, dumb lineman is gone. You just
can't play with those guys. A kid can have all the physical
ability in the world, but if he has no 'smarts,' forget it."
-Offensive line coach Larry Smith
.':\': .. J .. . *. . !. . }r'.}:"hh. . . '..:1 '::': .:":t:Y::":"?:f.S:" i.:;.:N.;:.;

games
composed of tight end Paul Seal, strong
tackle Paul Seymour, quick tackle Jim
Coode, guards Mike Hoban and Tom
Coyle, and center Bill Hart, all received
exceptional marks avainst UCLA.
Bruin mentor Pepper Rodgers said
after the game that the key to the final
result was the way in which the
Michigan line physically dominated his
smaller Bruin counterparts.
Few fans realize the distinction be-
tween the strongtackle and the quick
tackle. Schembechler's. theory is that
the former is his most powerful and
best blocker, while the latter has the
quickness needed to pull in certain sit-
uations. Incidentally, the strong tackle,
Seymour, is the man who calls the
blocking adjustments at the line of
scrimmage.
Althougheneither Smith or fellow line
coach Jerry Hanlon would predict a
pro career for any of their pupils, it is
obvious that Seymour, and possibly
Coyle, have solid football futures. "We
don't worry about that stuff, cracked
Hanlon. "It's too hard to predict."
As far as keeping their linemen en-
thused about banging people around day
after day, Smith said, "There's a gen-
eral pride among the members of the
'pit.' They feel that nothing happens if
they don't do the job, and they're so
right."

Commenting on line play and its re-
quirements, Smith said: "The day of
the big, dumb lineman is gone. You just
can't play with 'those guys. A kid can
have all the physical ability in the
world, but if he has no 'smarts', forget
it."
Besides intelligence, the other ob-
vious attribute for linemen is size.
Smith says that "you can't go with
guys under 6-0." Michigan's current
group averages 6-3 and 233, which is
near perfect.
A prominent change in defensive align-
ment has forced teams to increase the

knock heads with linemen very often.
Today,. however, 50 per cent of Big
Ten teams use the 4-3 pro defense in
which 240-pound tackles line up nose-
to-nose t with the guards. So bigger
guards are needed to block tackles rath-
er than linebackers.
Michigan uses films extensively, both
as a scouting aid and for player evalu-
ation. Smith and his charges view op-
ponent's defenses all week, picking out,
basic alignments and information on per-
sonnel. Wolverine linemen are also
graded on every play in every game.
Undoubtedly Michigan's front wall,

Daily Photo by TERRY McCARTHY
PAUL SEYMOUR (77) is seen here blocking for Michigan teammate Harry Banks (20) in the Wolver-
ine's season opener against Northwestern. Seymour moved from tight end to strong tackle this year in
a move that bolstered the Michigan offensive line and helped make it one of the best in the nation.
Seymour and company hope to lead Michigan to their third victory of the season this Saturday against
Tulane.

TRIBE FLIPS BIRDS:
Brewers

bean

Boston

By The Associated Press
BOSTON-George Scott's two-run
homer capped a three-run uprisingj
in the eighth inning as the Mil-
waukee Brewers beat Boston 6-4
last night and cut the Red Sox'
lead to a half-game in the Ameri-
can League East.
The Red Sox remained in front
of the Detroit Tigers, who were
idle, and 21/2 games up on the
Baltimore Orioles and New York
Yankees, who were tied for third.
The Orioles lost to the Cleveland
Indians 3-2 last night while the
Yankees did not play.
Brock Davis touched off the
Brewers' winning rally in the
eighth with a bunt single. Davis
stole second and continued to third
on a wild throw into center field
by Boston catcher Carlton Fisk.
Davis scored on Ellie Rodriguez'
sacrifice fly. Joe Lahoud then
reached base when first baseman
C a r 1 Yastrzemski fumbled his
ground ball and Scott followed with
a home run into the center field
bleachers at Fenway Park, No. 19
of the year.
Rick Auerbach gave the Brewers
an insurance run in the ninth with
his second homer of the season.
The Red Sox teed off on Mil-
waukee starter Bill Parsons, scor-
ing four runs in the first two in-
nings with the help of the long
ball. Yastrzemski hit a two-run

daily
sports
NIGHT EDITOR':
FRANK LONGO
homer in the first and pitcher
Marty Pattin added a two-run shot
in the second.
* * *
Birds burned
BALTIMORE - Chris Chambliss
and Ray Fosse smacked consecu-
tive home runs in the fourth in-
ning, leading Cleveland to a 3-2
victory over Baltimore's fading
Orioles last night.
Chambliss, who also singled home
a Cleveland run in the sixth, drove
a 2-2 pitch from loser Mike Cuel-
lar, 17-12, over the right field
fence to snap a scoreless deadlock
with one out in the fourth. Two
pitches later, Fosse clubbed an-
other Cuellar delivery over the
fence in left-center.
The Orioles got one back in
the fifth on singles by Johnny
Oates and pinch-hitter Don Bu-
ford and a sacrifice fly by Bobby
Grich. Buford stole second, but
winner Dick Tidrow, 14-15, struck
out Paul Blair to end the threat.
The Indians boosted their lead
to 3-1 in the sixth off reliever Pat
Dobson when Chambliss singled
home Buddy Bell, who had led off
with a double.
* * *
Phillies falter
PHILADELPHIA -. Pittsburgh

scored five times in the sixth in-
ning last night and Steve Blass
hurled the Pirates to a 5-1 decision
over the Philadelphia Phillies for
his 19th victory of the season.
Al Oliver doubled in two runs
and Manny Sanguillen singled in
two more before Blass capped the
big inning by knocking in the fifth
run.
Billy Champion, 4-14, suffered
the loss, his 11th straight. Cham-
pion took over when starter
Wayne Twitchell was injured in
the first inning fielding a Ro-
berto Clemente smash to the
mound.
Dave Cash and Rennie Stennett
singled to open the sixth for the
Pirates, and when Champion threw
late to third with Willie Stargell's
bouncer, the bases were loaded.
Cubs conquer
MONTREAL - Billy Williams
drove in three runs with a single
and a home run and Milt Pappas
won his 10th straight game with a
four-hitter as the Chicago Cubs
dumped the Montreal Expos 6-0 in
National League East baseball last

night.
The Cubs got to Montreal
starter Bill Stoneman, 11-14, for
four runs in the third inning,
breaking up a scoreless tie.
Pappas led off with a single and
was sacrificed to second by Don
Kessinger. Jose Carenal then walk-
ed and Williams drove in Pappas
with a base hit to right. Cardenal
scored on Jim Hickman's sacrifice
fly.
** *
Cardinals clipped
ST. LOUIS-Jerry Koosman and
Tug McGraw combined on a four-
hitter as the New York Mets de-
feated the St. Louis Cardinals 3-1
last night.
<".$% ... . &".vA": ..";.".......r":. .- {
Billboard
There is an organizational
meeting tonight at 8:00 in room
1403 of the Chem building for all
those athletic women interested
in playing women's rugby. For
more information contact Jan at
764-1024.

THINKING QF LIVING
IN A FRATERNITYj4
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RUSH DATES: Sept. 24-28, 6-10:30 p.m.
SInformation? Call 761-5020

WILD'S

AP Photo
Broadway () Joe
Joe Namath, who passed for 497'yards Sunday in the New York
Jets 44-34 victory over the Baltimore Colts, relaxes during a
break in the taping of "Sesame Street," a popular children's
show in which Namath will appear.

TEAM CANADA EVENS SERIES:
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NEW LOCATION: 1150 Rosewood off S. Industrial

I

MOSCOW UP) - Paul Henderson
scored a goal with 2:06 left to give
Team Canada a 4-3 victory over
the Soviet Union last night and
even the eight-game hockey series.
Each team now has won three
games and lost three. One game
was tied.
With the score tied 3-3 and
both teams shorthanded, Toron-
to's Henderson took the puck
into his own zone and pushed it
between a pair 'of Russian de-
fenders. He circled left, picked
up the puck and drove it past
- goalie Vladislav Tretyak for the
winning tally as nearly 3,000
Canadian fans in the crowd of
15,000 cheered wildly.
Canada opened the first period
scoring when Phil Esposito of Bos-
ton got a pass to the right of the
Soviet goal, whirled and flipped
it in.
Alex Yakushev tied it for the
Soviets on 'a break when defense-
man Brad Park fell. Gary Berg-
man tried in vain to cut off the
charging Russian but Yakushev
beat Tony Esposito of Chicago.
With the Canadians short-hand-
ed, Vladimir Petrov broke loose
down the right side, faked goalie
Esposito off his feet and drilled
the puck into the left side for a 2-1
Soviet lead.
A minute later Serge Savard
of Montreal worked the puck free
along the boards, centered it to
Phil Esposito who fired in his
second score of the night to tie the
ORIGINAL G
works of
CHAGAL
, r. A U

score.
In the third minute of the fi-
nal period, a hustling Rod Gil-
bert of New York took a pass
behind the Soviet net from Jean
Patello, also of New York, swung
around the net, faked and back-
handed it in to put the Canadians

Russia
1 ahead 3-2.
The hard - charging Soviet team
tied the score two monutes later
on a power play with Bergman in
the penalty box. Alexander Es-
maltsev passed to Yakushev who
scored for his second goal of the
game.

.S:X;'f a$:2 ' ?:::ii'',N 0%:" i p'ar C:":r }%a:. ..AM5% E{t
Major League Standings

American League
East

National League
East

Boston
Detroit
Baltimore
New York
Cleveland
Milwaukee

w
80
80
78
78
68
62

L
67
68
70
70
83
87

Pct.
.544
.541
.527
.527
.450
.416

GB
22/2
2
14
19

Pittsburgh
Chicago
New York
St. Louis
Montreal
Philadelphia

W
93
82
77
71
67
55

L
55
66
70
79
80
93

Pct. GB
.628 --
.554 11
.524 15%2
.473 23
.456 25%
.372 38

West
Oakland 87 60 .592 -
Chicago 83 64 .565 4
Minnesota 75 70 .517 11
Kansas City 73 74 .497 14
California 71. 78 .477 17
Texas 52 96 .351 35%
Yesterday's Results
Milwaukee 6, Boston 4
Cleveland 3, Baltimore 2
California 2, Texas 1
Minnesota at Oakland, postponed, 2
Other clubs not scheduled
Today's Games
Milwaukee (Brett 6-11) at Boston
(McGlothen 8-6)
Cleveland (Tidrow 13-15) at Baltimore
(McNally 13-16)
California (wright 16-11) at Texas
(Hand 10-13)
New York (Kline 16-8) at Detroit
(Coleman 18-13)
Kansas City (Nelson 9-6) at Chicago
(wood 24-15)
Minnesota (woodson 14-14) at Oak-
land (Hunter 20-7)

west
Cincinnati 91 57 .615 -
Houston 81 66 .551 92
Los Angeles 80 68 .541 11
Atlanta 69 79 .466 22
San Francisco 64. 85 .430 27%
San Diego 57 89 .390 33
Yesterday's Results
Pittsburgh 5, Philadelphia 1
Chicago 6, Montreal 0
Atlanta 10, Cincinnati 9
San Francisco 5, Houston 2
New York 3, St. Louis 1
San Diego at Los Angeles, night
Today's Games
Pittsburgh (Elils 14-7 or Kison 8-7)
at Philadelphia (Reynolds (2-13)
Chicago (Reuschel 8-8) at Montreal
(Renko 1-8)
Atlanta (Niekro 15-11) at Cincinnati
(Grimsley 14-7)
San Francisco (willoughby 6-3) at
Houston (wilson 14-9)
New York (McAndrew 11-6) at St.
Louis (Cleveland 14-15)
San Diego (Arlin 9-20) at Los Angeles
(Sutton 17-9)

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L, TROVA, LINDNER, MA TISSE,
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