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September 24, 1972 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-09-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Pope Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, September 24, 1972.

PageTenTHE ICHGAN AIL SunaySeptmbe 24,197

Communist threats'
cited in Philipines

(Continued from Page 1)
However, he gave no indication
how long martial law will con-
tinue.
Marcos said that while Maoist
rebels were the major danger,
there are grave problems within
the armed forces, the courts; the
government and society at large.
Marcos, 56, is the first Filipino
president to be elected to two
terms and the first to declare mar-
tial law since the republic was
formed in 1946, after the United
States granted independence.
He addressed the nation nearly
24 hours after signing his procla-
mation, and promised to issue or-
ders that will proclaim land re-
form, remove corrupt officials,
break up criminal syndicates and
establish new rules of conduct for
government workers and public of-
ficials.
Marcos said the armed forces
would start "by cleaning up their
own ranks . . . soldiers must set
the standard."
He warned persons against try-
ing to use blood ties of friendship
to gain favors from government
officials.
. He complained of robberies, mur-
ders, kidnapings, tax evasion,
price manipulation and corruption
and said anarchy must be elimi-
nated and peace and order main-
tained.
Remarks about reform occurs
red throughout his half-hour ad-
dress ,and came through clearly
despite the predominant theme in-
volving the Communist threat to

overthrow the government.
Marcos has previously said the
major enemy of the Philippine peo-
ple was their own apathy. He
warned that when the society was
sick, it must reform or crumble
under its own dead weight.
The president announced early
this year that the spread of com-
munism had been contained. He
told the public yesterday, however,
that attempts to control the Com-
munists have failed, "the rebel-
lion has worsened . . and we
have fallen back on our last arm of
defense."
The declaration of martial law
was not unexpected. Marcos' move
came after nearly two months of
bombings and other terrorist acts
in the greater Manila area.
Many of the president's critics,
however, said before imposition of
the law that Marcos would use it
to maintain his weakening politi-
cal position.
Several of the president's critics
were among those reported arrest-
ed in early morning sweeps by na-
tional police.
A police spokesman confirmed
that three opposition Liberal sena-
tors, Ramon Mitra, Jose Diokno
and Benigno Aquino Jr. - had,
been arrested. Aquino is one of the
president's most outspoken critics.
In addition, Manila Times col-
umnist Maximo Soliven also was
arrested, the spokesman said. The
Manila Times building, in which
The Associated Press has its of-
fice, was closed.

Sherif f
boycotts
tow firm
(Continued from Page 1)
Northside President Jim Herd
last night confirmed that Harvey
campaign posters had been remov-
ed from his property over the past
week. He explained that his com-
pany had decided to take no sides
in the sheriff's election.
"I'm not aware of any reason
why this was done," Herd said in
reaction to the memo. "One of the
(Harvey) signs was put up last
week and I told the deputy (who
put it up) that I couldn't guarantee
it would stay up very long.
"As a matter of fact it stayed up
only a few hours," Herd added.
"We had a meeting of our board
of directors and decided that we
shouldn't get involved in politics."
Northside towed about 200 cars
annually for the sheriff's depart-
ment, Herd said.
His two year-old company spe-
cialized in wrecker service for
large vehicles and police agen-
cies, including the Ann Arbor Po-
lice Department.
It is equipped with seven wreck-
ers, compared with five at the al-
ternative station cited by Harvey.
According to officers with both
the sheriff's department and the
Ann Arbor police, Northside is a
fast, reliable service. None of the
many officers contacted last night
had negative comments about the
company..
Subscribe to
The Daily

Drunk drivers bring families together.

New anti-terrorism
plan offered in U.N.

AP Photo _ __ _ __ _ _

In hospital rooms and at funerals.
Because that's where the drunk driver's victims wind up.
Drunk drivers are involved in at least 25,000 deaths and 800,000
crashes every year.
Ani what can you do?
Remember, theddrunk driver, the abusive drinker, the problem drinker
may be sick and need your help.
The first thing you can do is get him off the road. For his sake and yours.
Do something. Write the National Safety Council, Dept. A, 425 North
Michigan Ave., Chicago. Illinois, 60611. And your voice will be heard.

No highway in the sky

UNITED NATIONS, N. Y. (A') -
An amendment was put forward
yesterday in a try to win more{
votes for Secretary-General Kurt
Waldheim's proposal that the U.N.
General Assembly ponder how to
stop terrorism.
The assembly, meeting on the
weekend, postponed debate on Ko-
rea until next year, shelving a
resolution backed by China and
the Soviet Union to get U.S. troops
out of South Korea.
The vote of 70-35 with 21 absten-
tions ratified a steering committee
recommendation.
Later, by general consent, the
assembly put on its agenda an
item proposed by Yugoslavia as a
step toward urging the Security
Council to reconsider the U. S.
membership bid of Bangladesh.
Chinese Ambassador Huang Hua,
who vetoed the Bangladesh appli-
cation Aug. 25, reiterated that
China "cannot agree to the ad-
mission of Bangladesh."

It's not thatthe'Goodyear blimp decided to tie up on the tip
Jamaica submitted the amend- ofSnFacsosTasm ic CopbulngRthrt'te
ment to Waldheim's proposed ag- ofSnFacsosTasmrcCrpbuligRthrt'te
enda item on terrorism, attempt- work of a clever Frisco photographer who caught the airship
ing to overcome objections that passing by.
the proposal was too broad and - - --
vague.!
The original title for the item
said: "Measures to prevent ter- 1 UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT
rorism and other forms of vio- Today: OPEN JAM SESSION
lence which endanger or take in-
nocent human lives or jeopardize Monday: 300-8:00
fncentualieos."orndy:Beer and Wine Night
STARTING MONDAY, SEPT. 25th: HAPPY HOUR
'The amendment would insert the Mon.-Fri. 4:00-6:30
word "international," limiting the Wed.-Thurs.: GUARDIAN ANGEL
subject to terrorism across fron- 9:30-1:30
tiers and avoiding U. N. interfer-
ence in domestic police jurisdic-
tions. 208 W. Huron
The amendment also would de-
lete the words "other forms of LUNCHES DAILY
violence." This change could be
taken as excluding discussion of

,)
I
I

BRIDGE
UAC fall classes
SEE DETAILS IN
PERSONAL COLUMN

Scream Bloody Murder.

i(
7

Advertising contributed for the public god.

conventional warfare.
Observers presumed that Ja-
maica's intent was to narrow the
scope of Waldheim's proposal.

- DAYSTAR presents
FRI., Oct. 27-
COMMANDER CODY
ASLEEP AT THE WHEEL-BOOGIE BROS.
$2 - $3 - $3.50
SAT., Oct. 28 -
STEVIE WONDER
FRESH OFF THE ROLLING STONES' TOUR
$2.50 - $4 - $4.50 - $5
SUN., Oct. 29-
THE GRATEFUL DEAD
$3.50 - $4.50 - $5.50
CODY and WONDER tickets go on sale this Monday, 9/25, at
the Michigan Union, 11-6 p.m. Also by mail to: UAC, Michigan
Union. SORRY, NO PERSONAL CHECKS.
NO MAIL ORDERS FOR "THE DEAD". Those tickets will go on
sale ONLY at Union the week of October 3rd. Watch THE DAILY
around Sept. 29, 30th for exact date.

Undergraduates:
BECOME INVOLVED
JOIN THE
UNDERGRADUATE POLITICAL
SCIENCE ASSOC.
A general meeting will be held on
MONDAY, SEPT. 25th

at 7:30 p.m. in

Room 429

M.H.

EVERY WATER POLLUTER
IN THIS COUNTRY HA S
A PRICE ON HIS hEAD!
49
iC
BUT THE LAW THAT PROVIDES FOR
REWARD HAS GONE ALMOST UNNOTICED
+THE WATER ACT of 1399 +
made it unlawful "to throw, discharge, or deposit any refuse
matter of any kind or description whatever into any navigable
water of the United States." The only exception is when a
permit to pollute is obtained from the Army Corps of Engi-
neers.
r70
E00003$2500**
The law makes every individual and corporate polluter
subject to a fine of 500 to 2,500 dollars for each day of the
violation.
And whoever catches the polluter can get half the fine as
S S ..r

,:

STAND OUT .. .
from the Crowd

Make good

use

of your spare time,
working on and
learning about
newspaper production.
JOIN THE DAILY
BUSINESS STAFF-Call Andy 764-0560 (days)

original works of graphic art-etchings, lithographs,-
by leading 20th century artists:

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