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September 24, 1972 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-09-24

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Sunday, September 24, 1972

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Sundy, Spteber 4, 172 HE MCHIGN DILYagehre

NO W 4
DIAL 5-6290 r ect ___in __dern____

SHOWS AT
1:10-3:10-5:00-
7:05-9 p.m.

Wilkes-Barre:

Getting

back on

its

An Irreverent Comedy Spoof
of Doctors and Hospitals!
with THE SEXIEST NURSE
in Military History!
Their bedside manner will bring a quick re-
covery to anyone looking for fun and enter-
tainment.
as Albert T. Hopfnagel-
Hospital Administratorrn
"here
Dofes It .
V#Y CwheR e you 18094,
N EASTMANCOLOR + FROM OERAMA RELEASN

-COMING-
"BUTTERFLIES ARE

FREE"

--
The conversation is so good
at thef
LSA Coffee Hou
even the
MUMMIES
join in
Next LSA Coffee Hour at
THE KELSEY MUSEUM
(opposite Angell Hall)
3:00-4:30.
Tuesday
Sept. 26

WILKES-BARRE, Pa. (IP) -
The worn shoes are piled high to-
day in front of Jimmy Alv and
Tony Bonczewski, finally back in
business after being wiped out.
in last June's flood. They've nev-
er had, it so good.
"It's because there used to be
three other shoe repair shops
in center city, and we're the only
ones back so far," Alv explains,
ripping off a sole from a man's
boot as customers enter the not-
yet-decorated store.
Florist Frank Hayes, across the
street, figures that's the reason,
too, he is doing well right now
- "only three of us are in busi-
ness, when there are normally
10."
Restaurants and lunchrooms
that are cooking again are jam-
med, many hard put to get
enough waitresses and kitchen
help. And Gene Shipula's T V
business also is booming.
"Repair ismy main work, and
I'm going buggy nuts scrubbing
mud off flood-damaged sets,"
Shipula says. "But we're also
selling a lot of new ones to re-
place those destroyed in t h e
water."
These stores are among the
small number - an estimated 15
per cent of more than 1,000 -
that hake cleaned up, fixed up
and reopened 12 weeks after the
Susquehanne River tore through
33-foot dikes June 23. It left an
estimated $1 billion damage and
about 40,000 homeless in t h i s
northeastern Pennsylvania valley
on the edge of the Pocono Moun-
tains.
The stricken residents and bus-
inesses in the 21 damaged towns
around Wilkes-Barre have been
struggling back to a semblance
of normal conditions, accepting
massive chunks of help - in
cash and temporary homes -
from the federal government.
"Without it, we'd be sunk,"
says Edgar Lashford, executive
vice president of the Greater
Wilkes-Barre Chamber of Com-
merce.
The United States already has
spent, or contracted for, more
than $350 million in the area.
President Nixon's special flood
coordinator, Frank Carlucci,
says this is only the beginning.
Interiors of buildings still are
being tossed out on sidewalks,,
and cleanup crews hired by the
Army engineers still dump the
debris into nearby abandoned an-
thracite mines. Some claim the
refuse already totals more than
150 million tons.
When it rains the dried mud
dredged from the river washes
out of the crevices and from the
lawns finally turning green again
as winter approaches, leaving
the sharp smell of mold in the
dampness.
One lady hosing down her porch
puts it bluntly: "It stinks."

000 from the Small Business Ad-
ministration to pay off my credi-
tors, I'll reopen," Simon says.
"It all depends on the govern-
ment."
SBA says it is working hard to
help Wyoming Valley homeown-
ers and businessmen. It has okay-
ed $145.1 million in loans to 17,-
272 persons and 532 businesses,
and expects to approve at least
$150 million more.
Under a federal law passed by
Congress last month, victims of
Tropical Storm Agnes won't have
to pay back any of the first $5,-
000 they borrow. The rest of their
loans will carry interest of only
1 per cent.
"It's not enough," says Lash-
ford, "for the little guy, the re-
tired widow, or the small store-
keeper.
"But an established busines has
a good chance to come out of
this in good shape, despite the
increased debt he'll have to take
on."
Marvin Slomowitz owns the 12-
store Mark Shopping Plaza in
Kingston and a half-dozen other
huge properties, all flooded. His
firm sustained $1.2 million in
damage. .
"I'm unhappy, damned unhap-
py, but luckier than a lot of oth-
ers," he says. "We're diversified,
and we'll be all right. It's the
little guy who lost a small busi-
ness and his home who's in trou-
ble."
Slomowitz didn't waste time
getting back into operation. He
brought in workmen right after
the 10 feet of water receded and
in ,a month had his shopping cen-
ter open again.
"We lost a few tenants, and
we quickly got new ones, and
we are 100 per cent rented," he
says. "We've applied for SBA
loans, and we' haven't got a
nickel yet. "
"The government probably-
thinks it is working speedily, but
it isn't really fast if you don't
get it immediately. When you
have payrolls to meet e v e r y
week there's got to be some pain
if you have to wait three to six
months for loan money."

feet
Slomowitz says the real vic-
tims of the flood are the middle
class - "those who had scrimp-
ed and saved" - and not the
poor people "who didn't hy a v e
very much to start with, and now
they are getting more than they
ever had before" - referring to
free housing for a year, f o o d
stamps, welfare checks.
He insists the government
should beef up the middle class
aid because ,"these are the people
who make up the heart of the
community."
Mal Castellino is in that boat.
Waiting for an SBA loan, his
men's clothing shop in down-
town Public Square didn't make
it back until after Labor Day,
and then he started with a "dis-
aster sale," getting rid of his
dry-cleaned flood stuff.
For nearly three months, shut
down, Castellino lived on sav-
ings and loans from relatives.
His apartment was washed out
with his business, leaving him
$35,000 in debt.
"But I think our business will
be good here again, and I can't
wait to really get going," he
says.
Right now most of those hit by
the flood are trying to hang
on to what cash they have for
the refurbishing ahead. "Our de-
deposits are up $3 million since
June 22, roughly 10, per cent,"
says Russell Gardner, president
of Hanover National Bank.
"People don't have any place
to spend their money," he says.
"Many are without auto trans-
portation and without neighbor-
hood stores to shop. For a while
all the taprooms were closed,
and so were the restaurants.
"People on fixed incomes have
been getting their money re-
gularly. Except for those who
have lost their jobs, most of the
others are doing fine."
Gardner, now operating h i s
main Wilkes-Barre office out of
a trailer parked in front of his
damaged building, says the flood
ended a lot of nonbank savings.
"We got a lot of wet money,"
he says, "money that had been
hidden before the flood in boxes,
mattresses. People's values have
changed."
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0562. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day througa Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier (campus area); $11 local mail
(in Mich. or Ohio); $13 non-local mail
(other states and foreign).
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
area); $6.50 local mail (in Mich. or
Ohio); $7.50 non-local mal (other
states and foreign).
Hare a flair for
artistic writing?
If you are interest-
ed in reviewing
drama dance, film,
poetry, and music,
or writing feature
stories about the
arts: Contact Arts
Michiga aiy

A FIRE ENGULFS four buildings in downtown Wilkes-Barre last June but firemen are unable to put it
out because flood waters prevented them from reaching the scene.

Downtown Wilkes-Barre's first
movie recently reopened, using
only the balcony section, be-
cause the main floor seats were
ruined. The people are going in
droves because, really, there's
not much else to do if you don't
care for the corner taproom and
TV reruns. More and more bright
neon signs are going up and turn-
ing on.
"There's plenty of people
around, even though most stores
are still closed," says Alv. "They
ride free buses into downtown
Wilkes-Barre, from all over the
valley, and they like to look
around and see what's going on."
The U.S. Department of Trans-
portation is picking up the week-
ly $67,000 tab to keep the buses
runnning without fares - and
plans to continue until at least
Oct. 19.
Many of the scars left by the
heavy flooding, worst natural dis-
aster in American history, won't
be patched up before winter
just not enough time, not enough

money, not enough help.
Carlucci, though, is aiming to
get every affected family in a
winterized shelter by the end of
September.
With two weeks to go, he re-
ported three-fourths, or nearly
11,000, of the 13,816 eligible fam-
ilies are housed.
Mayor Ernest Balcomb of nei-
ghboring Forty Fort, where most
of the town's 2,000 homes were
damaged, says complaints are
unbecoming as the recovery mov-
es steadily along.
"I think right now the govern-
ment is doing a lot," Balcomb
says. "I don't think people have
anything to holler about. It's
only been a few ionths, and they
have done a helluva lot."
Lashford predicts that within
the next 90 days, before Christ-
mas, anyway, "you will see a
good majority of the shops back
in operation, either on a limit-
ed or on a full basis."
And within a year Lashford is
certain business will be "pretty

well back to normal, and strong-
er.
"Sure, some people will never
come out of it, but as a whole the
retail stores and the factories will
be better," Lashford adds. May-
be.
Take William Simon. He lost
three stores and his house . . .
wiped out . . . a quarter of a
million dollars down the drain.
"If I can get $250,000 to $300,-

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They Only Speak When Spoken To.

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Today's staff .. .
News: Sara Fitzgerald, John Marston, Rebecca Warner
Editorial: Lindsay Chaney
Photo Technician: Karen Kasmauski
U of M FOLKLORE SOCIETY
MASS MEETING
POT LUCK SUPPER WITH GUEST SPEAKER
STEVE ADDISS
(of Addiss & Crofut)
All invited Bring food & instruments
6:30 P.M., MON., SEPT. 25
WEST LOUNGE OF SOUTH QUAD
CINEMA I presents
SON OF MOVIE ORGY
Four hours of New Jersey film collector Jon Davidson's fabulous
fifties footage. Movies, TV Shows, oreviews and ads-some of
the most bizarre and outrageous film clips you never see. A real
media rush!
SUNDAY: ONE SHOW ONLY, 7 p.m.
$1.00 CONTRIBUTION AUDITORIUM A ANGELL HALL
THE U-M PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM
USHER APPLICATION
FOR
THE PLAY-OF-THE-MONTH SERIES
NAME __-
A DDRESS

THE LAST OF HURRICANE AGNES dumps nearly four feet of
water on downtown Pottstown, Pa.

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I wish to usher for (indicate choice
2nd, 3rd, 4th) :

Series A
(Sat. Eves.)

Series
(Sun. Eves.)

Series C
(Sat. Mats.)

"Sleuth"
"The Effect of
Gamma Rays"
"Godspell"
"Applause"
"'Story Theatre"

Sat., Oct. 21
Sat., Dec. 2

of series, 1 st,
Series D
(Sun. Mats.)
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Sun., Oct. 3
Sun., Jan. 28
Sun., Mar. 25
Sun., Apr. 15

Sat.,
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Mar. 24
Apr. 14

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II

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REPORTING TIMES: 2 p.m. matinees; 7 p.m. evenings

U J~un.I . k rvu.1r.J . 1 Si

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