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September 22, 1972 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-09-22

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Page Twelve

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, September 22, 1972

-00000

COMMITTEE ACTION:

PageTweve TE MCHIAN DILYFridy, eptmber22,197

No-ault wins support
ANSING, Mich. (/') - The Under a no-fault plan, the in- one-third of all the lawyers in the
use Insurance Committee ap- surance companies would pay for country are involved in insurance
ved yesterday a no-fault in- damages. incurred in auto acci- work.

Stempien attacks Esch
in local campaign stop

1

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Hot
pro

surance bill that would become
mandatory for all Michigan ve-
hicles except motorcycles on Oct.
1, 1973, if passed by the legisla-
ture and found constitutional by
the Michigan Supreme Court.
The committee's 10-0 v o t e
cleared the way for possible floor
action next week, said House
Speaker William Ryan. Approval
there would set up a second
Senate vote. A different bill pass-
ed there earlier.

dents, regardless of which ve-
hicle was responsible for the ac-
cident. Currently, an individual
must undertake a civil suit to
prove the other driver was at
fault in order to collect for
damages.
The greatest opposition to no-
fault insurance has come from
lawyers who handle cases relat-
ing to insurance claims. Accord-
ing to some estimates, nearly

Acceptance of no-fault at the
legislative level has been slow
largely because most legislators
are lawyers and are not anxious
to adopt measures that could
hurt the legal profession.
Massachusetts has enacted a no-
fault law, and in its first year
of operation, insurance compan-
ies paid out less money in claims
than they did under the previous
system.

(Continued from Page 1)
reservations about the extent of
McGovern's proposed cuts in the
defense budget.
Stempien said that although his
opponent Esch had a reputation as
a moderate Republican, in reality
his record was. conservative. He
cited instances in which Esch voted
in support of the Vietnam War and
against ecology measures.
The newly-redefined 2nd District
is predominately Democratic, and
Stempien must be considered at
least an even challenger against
the incumbent Esch.

IBut here in Ann Arbor, he mightj
be hurt by his stance on two major
issues: He opposes abortion re-
form, and is against cross-district
busing. He declined to speculate
as to how those two issues could
affect his chances. of carrying
liberal Ann Arbor.
Stemipen and the Democrats will1
wage a hard campaign for the con-
gressional seat. In addition to the
usual campaign organization, they
plan to enlist Alaska Sen. Mike
Gravel, Sen. Philip Hart (D-Mich.),
and possibly Sen. Edward Kennedy
(D-Mass.) to speak in the area on
Stempien's behalf.
Stempien expressed confidence
that he would win the race, pre-
dicting that McGovern's local sup-
port would give him the impetus
needed for victory.
~I

SUNDAY AFTERNOON
Rafael Fruehbeck le Burgos
CONDUCTS
IN HILL AUDITORIUM
. ickets available at:
.W&...VETY
&WSICA L SO CIET7Y
BURTON TOWER, ANN ARBOR MON. THRU FRI. 9-4:30, SAT. 9-12 PHONE 665-37,7
NOTICE: Rush tickets, $1.00 each, available at Hill Auditorium box office, Saturday morning
11:30-12:00; no choice of seat location, limit 2 per person.

MINORITY APPEAL:

McGovern meets with
Detroit black leaders

Accord reached with
Russians on ecology

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(Continued from Page 1)
Sen. Muskie, who served as a
warm-up man for the speech, told
the blacks that hetdid notalways
agree with McGovern, but had
come to respect him nonetheless.
"I've looked into his heart and-
I believe he's a decent man. I be-
lieve the key word surrounding this
man is hope," Muskie said.
Muskie has been traveling with
McGovern for the past three days
in McGovern's campaign airplane,
the Dakota Queen II. McGovern's
World War II bomber was named
Dakota Queen I.
Earlier yesterday, in New York,
McGovern charged that Americans
were paying $5 billion a year in
"heroin tax" while the Nixon ad-
ministration failed to crack down
on the flow of drugs from South-
east Asia.
"Pious announcements by Presi-
dent Nixon and his spokesmen
cannot cover up the fact that the
number of heroin addicts in the
United States has almost doubled
since 1968," the Democratic presi-
dential candidate said.
McGovern said he is prepared to
debate Nixon on the administra-

tion's record in combating the
flow of heroin into the United
States or have a McGovern spokes-.
man debate a Nixon spokesman on
the issue.
The allegations came in a
lengthy statement issued as Mc-
Govern campaigned in New York.
He also touched on the subject
in a midday address to a Brook-
lyn street crowd of less than 200.
A Brooklyn Democratic party
source, fuming that the turnout
was so small, said word that Mc-
Govern would make the Brooklyn
appearance was not confirmed un-
til Wednesday and there was not
enough time to publicize the event.
The South Dakota. senator also
appeared before the security-con-
scious conference of Presidents of
American Jewish organizations.
Briefcases and typewriters of
newsmen and McGovern staffers
were inspected before they enter-
ed the hall.
McGovern aides pointed to re-
cent anti-Jewish terrorist activi-
ties around the world, including
boobytrapped e n v e 1 o p e s
sent through the mail, as likely
justification for the search.

(Continued from Page 1)
be designated.
As for lakes, there will be pro-
jects involvingathe North American
Great Lakes and Lake Tahoe as
well as Lake Baikal in Siberia, the
world's largest repository of fresh
water.
Urban environment will be ex-
amined in San .Francisco and At-
lanta. The Soviets offered Lenin-
grad and a second city to be named
later.
Earthquake forecasting projects
will involve the San Andreas fault
in California and Garm-Dushambey
in Soviet Central Asia.

The program also will bring to-
gether representatives of the indus-
tries that contribute to environ-
mental pollution.
This was revealed at the joint
press conference by Yevgeny Fyo-
dorov, chief administrator of So-
viet Hydrometerorological Serv-
ices, who signed the memorandum
for the Soviet side.
Train said the first exchanges of
visits under the agreement would
be held as early as "November or
December."

Dept. of Speech Communication and Theatre
UNIVERSITY PLAYERS

p

BILL

Reform Creative Service
for Succos
Circle - Creative Poetry - Torah Study
Wine and Challah
FRIDAY, Sept. 22-8 P.M.
HILLEL, 1429 Hill-663-4129
Please note that reform Shabbat services will be held at Hillel
every Friday night at 8 P.M. Shabbat Shalom
1A

FORGOTTEN WORKS
Vicorian Clothing, Velvets, 40's, 20's, hats,
funky lamps, mirrors, items bizarre.
FORGOTTEN WORKS
ANTIQUE VILLAGE-410 N. Fourth Ave.
76941227. Sat.-Sun. 9-6
->t><>(-0 -0< >< ><= 0= 0 ->< ><

.1972-73
Oct. 11-14
(Mendelssohn)
. S17f

Ticket Information
The Box Office at Trueblood Theatre will open
for season subscription sales only on October 4,
5, 6. The Box Office at Lydia Mendelssohn will
be open for season subscriptions and single sales
October 9 - 14. Thereafter it will be open weeks
of performance only at the theatre scheduled
for each play. Hours: Performance Days: 12:30
-8:30; otherwise: 12:30-5:00. Mail Orders
will be filled prior to the opening of the Box
Office.
PRICES: (SEASON SUBSCRIPTIONS OFFER
SAVINGS AND PREFERRED LOCATIONS.)
SEASON SUBSCRIPTIONS: $15.00, $10.00
INDIVIDUAL TICKETS: $3.00, $2.00
NOTE: The higher priced tickets are the first 17
rows of orchestra and first 4 rows of balcony.
All performances at 8:00 P.M. Sharp! Late-
comers will be seated at the convenience o6 the
audience. No refunds. Exchanges, when pos-
sible, until 4 P.M. day of performance.
Mendelssohn Box Office: 668-6300
Trueblood Box Office: 764-5387
Power Center Box Office: 763-3333

TROPIC
ISLE

Order Blank

I

O'DELL ALL-GLASS TANK SALE
10 gal. $7.50 20gal. $16.00
15 gal. $12.00 29 gal. $20.00
29 gal. complete salt set-up $64.95
DON'T MISS OUT ON THESE PRICES-YOU
WON'T SEE PRICES THIS LOW AGAIN!
ic FISH SALE.
Buy one at regular price-get another for lc
(sale applies to fresh-water fish only)

CouPAGE
Nov. 15-18 (Power Center)
c (Mendelssohn)
ININNOK

Direct to you from PEKING,
Official Chinese Periodicals in English
PEKING REVIEW - China's political views and articles on current
national and international issues; air-mailed weekly. $6 per year.
CHINESE LITERATURE- Contemporary Chinese literature and
color reproductions of current Chinese art; monthly. $5 per year.
CHINA RECONSTRUCTS-Articles on ecooi developments.
Illustrated; monthly. $5 per year.
CHINA PICTORIAL--Comprehensive pictorial magazine on doea
opments and events in China; in color, monthly. $5 per year.
Send check or money order to:
PROBE
B0X 156
Pound Ridge, N.Y.'10578
. ii.. ..: . ..,.. r+..,..,..:..xAcw...."!; "fi!, . *. . *.*... .,***... .
INDIAN
SUMMER
natural foods
restaurant {
Breakfast 8:30-11:00 (12 Sat.)
Luncheon Special 11-3
Dinners 'til 8:30
AND NOW-
3-5 P.M. ONLY

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We- are now able to offer to our custome.rs at a small fee the
most complete and elaborate TEST KITS for fresh and salt water.
FORA BETTER LIFE FOR YOUR FISH-STOP IN TO SEE JOHN
and NICK.
1731 PLYMOUTH (behind Lum's) 769-4188

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Jan.31-Feb.3
(Mendelssohn)

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by WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE

(Power Center)
Anr- 11-1A

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original works of graphic art-etchings, lithographs,-
by leading 20th century artists:

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