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September 21, 1972 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-09-21

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Thursday, September 21, 1972

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

DIAL 5-6290 i

SHOWS AT'
:10-3:10-5:00-
7:05-9 ,p.m.

An Irreverenf Comedy Spoof
of Doctors and Hospitals!
with THE SEXIEST NURSE
in Military History!
Their bedside manner will bring a quick re-
covery to anyone looking for fun and enter-
tainment.
ti .: Peter Sellers
as Albert T. Hop iiagel
HospitalAdmIflistrator in
Does It
0l '1YWher Vsuaugh
N EASTMANCOLOR -FRO IERAMA RELEASING
COMING
"BUTTERFLIES ARE FREE"

n ews briefs.
by The Assoite Pes
THE SENATE FINANCE COMMITTEE yesterday approved
$6 billion in new Social Security benefits as part of a massive wel-
fare reform bill.
Money for the benefits will come from a $6 billion Social Security
tax increase; also approved by the committee.
Under present law, a person working after retirement can earn
$1,680 a year without loss of benefits. The new bill would allow such a
person to earn up to $2,400 a year.
The committee, in its decision, rejected the request of the Nixon
administration to drop some of the benefits as being too costly.
* * *
THE MICHIGAN HOUSE INSURANCE COMMITTEE is sched-
uled to vote today on a compromise bill setting up a modified, no-
fault auto insurance system in Michigan.
Rep. Matthew McNeely (D-Detroit), committee chairman, predicted
favorable committee action immediately and final passage by the
legislature sometime this fall.
McNeely cautioned that there is little likelihood of decreased in-
surance premiums saying, "I don't think anyone can guarantee that."
The proposed compromise bill, he said, will not attempt to extend
the no-fault concept to property damage. This issue had been a sticking
point with major insurance carriers.
Definition of medical coverage is still being worked out McNeely
said, but would not likely be unlimited, as some versions of the proposal
have called for.
DR. JOHN ONCLAY of the University .of Michigan has been
named by the Vernon Stouffer Foundation as one of four scientists
who will receive the, $50,000 Stouffer Prize for work in combatting
heart disease.
The four were honored for their research in finding the answer to
how hot fat and cholesterol are transported in the blood.
Dr. John Gefman of the University of Calfornia at Berkeley, Dr.
Vincent Dole of-the Rockefeller Institute in New York, and Dr. Robert
Corcon Jr. of the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md., are the
other recipients.
THE QUESTION OF who fired the shotgun blast in the hallway
of a Black Panther party apartment during a 1969 police raid in
Chicago remained unanswered yesterday, even after the court
heard expert testimony on the matter.
Herbert MacDonell, professor of criminology at Elmira, N.Y. Col-
lege, said Tuesday that the blast did not come from any of the guns
police used in the raid, which resulted in the killings of Panther
leaders Fred Hampton and Mark Clark.
MacDonell, however, did say that the shot was fired in the hall-
way where the police were huddled, and not from the living room of
the apartment.
* *
THE ILLINOIS SUPREME Court ruled yesterday that Richard
Speck cannot be executed for the 1966 murder of eight nurses in!
Chicago, and ordered a hearing to help determine a new sentence.
In a two-page opinion, the justices cited the June. 29 ruling of the
U.S. Supreme Court that the death penalty is unconstitutional in most
cases.
"The death penalty cannot be reimposed on the defendant and
the only remaining question is the procedure to be followed in re-
sentencing him to a sentence other than death," said the opinion,
signed by Justice Walter Schaefer.
UGANDA'S AIR WAR against Tanzania suffered a setback
earlier this week when Sudan refused to allow Lybian troops that
had come to aid the Ugandans, to fly over Sudanese territory.
Ugandan President, Idi Amin, has said that he would "instruct the
Uganda air force and the seaborne regiment to destroy Tanzanian
camps where the enemy is planning to launch another invasion of
Uganda.'
Tanzanian army sources said Tuesday that the Tanzanian invaders
of Uganda were in reality Ugandan exiles; and the Tanzanian president,:
Julius Nyerere, said that he might be compelled to take his forces
off a defensive footing unless Uganda halted air strikes against
Tanzanian territory.
Both countries are members of the Organization'of African Unity
whose members pledge to refrain from interference in each others
internal affairs.

in

UN

over

Page Three
L'ast-West clash

U.S.

troops in orea
UNITED NATIONS, N. Y. (A) - The committee that
screens the General Assembly agenda turned down a Chinese-
Soviet move for debate on U. S. troops in Korea yesterday,
and heard a plea from Secretary-General Kurt Waldheim for
action to stop terrorism.
The 25-nation committee voted 16 to 7 with one ab-
stention. to recommend postponement until next year of the
proposal by Communist and some nonaligned countries for
the ouster of American troops from Korea.
Ambassador Huang Hua of.China told the committee that
the American troops and the U.N. commission set up to re-
unify the country are "the root cause for the prolonged divi-
sion of Korea," and he called for the ouster of American
troops from South Korea.

The British ambassador, Sir
Colin Crowe, asserted that U. N.
members could best encourage
current contacts betweenthe two
Koreas by keeping quiet. He for-
mally asked postponement of any
debate on a proposal by China,
the Soviet Union and 26 other
Communist and nonaligned coun-
tries for the General Assembly to
order the U. S. troops out of the
country and suspend its reunifica-
tion commission.
"Our U. N. debrtes have con-
tributed little to the situation in
Korea except -acrimony and theI
violent language of the cold war
. Let us allow the Koreans to1
conduct the debate onf Korea

FDA head
says laws
restrictive
WASHINGTON {P) - Expansion
of food-safety laws to prohibit ad-
ditives blamed for birth defects
"would essentially ban all food
ingredients and most foods," Com-
missioner Charles Edwards, head
of the Food and Drug Administra-
tion said yesterday.

AP Photo
WILLY BRANDT, West German Chancellor (foreground) ad-
dresses Parliament in Bonn, yesterday. Brandt asked for a vote
of confidence. In the background, (left to right) are Justice Minis-
ter Gerhard Jahn, Inner Aff irs Minister Hans Genscher and
Foreign Minister Walter Scheel.
Irandt sets staoe
for genleral elections

BONN, Germany (A) - Chan-
cellor Willy Brandt set the stage
yesterday for a parliamentary
maneuver to prematurely end
the term of office which brought
him the Nobel Peace Prize.
Brandt is clearing the way for
general elections that he hopes
will restore his majority.
In the only device permitted by
Bonn's rigid constitution to dis-
solve the Bundestag before the
end of its four-year term, Brandt
asked the lower house for a vote
of confidence which he knows he
cannot win when its takes place
tomorrow.
Brandt told the 496 Bundestage
lawmakers the self-contradictory
move was forced on him by the
loss of his ruling majority four
months ago, when defecting gov-
ernment legislators left the low-
er house split 248 to 248 in an
unprecedented stalemate.
Bitterly criticizing the defect-
ors, Brandt said they vetoed the
September 1969 election r e s u 1 t
which originally gave his Socal
Democrats and their Free Demo-

cratic coaliti<9n partners a 12 vote
majority.-
In a preview of perhaps tho
toghest, closest-run election
campnign in West Germany > 23-
xear history, onposition Chrstian
Democrat leader Rainer s'3arzel
accused Brandt of trying to cov-
er up the ."decisive wreckage"'
of his policies in "belittling col-
leagues who acted in loyalty to
their convictions."
The absence of Schiller, who
rockednBrandt's government 'ast
resigning his Cabinet post last
July, upset the four-month par-
liamentary stalemate and left
Brandt's men with only 247 votes
to the opposition's 248.
However, the chancellor's cal-
culated parliamentary defeat was
balanced by one consolation. The
Bundestag passed without debate
a pioneering treaty relaxing sur-
face traffic between West and
Communist East Germany which
forms the cornerstone of Brandt's
efforts to reconcile the rival Ger-
manies.

themselves," said Crowe. The law banning food additives
The steering committee, select- that cause cancer in man or ani-
ed by the 27th assembly after the mals led to the removal of the
opening of a 13-week assembly artificial sweetener cyclamate and
session Tuesday, began meeting the cattle-growth drug diethylstil-
to recommend the items the as- bestrol (DES) and threatens sac-
sembly should place on its agenda charm and the widely used so-
from among 101 proposed topics. dium nitrite and sodium nitrate
Huang used basically the same preservatives.
argument for asking that the mat- "Carried to its logical extreme,"
ter be debated as Crowe used for Edwards said, the Delaney Clause
asking that it be postponed: There would ban "all food containing
should be no foreign interference such carcinogenic environmental
while the Koreas talk. contaminants as traces of radio-
China and it supporters argued active material."
the troops constitute interference, A professor of environmental
while Crowe said that a U. N. de- health, Samuel Epstein, said he is
bate constitutes interference. 1 unaware of any food additive that
"The Chinese government and 'is carcinogenic, teratogenic or
people have always held that the mutagenic and cannot be safely re-
affairs ofaa country should be moved.
managed by the people them- Mutagens and teratogens are
selves, and there is no justifica- substances which promote genetic

tion for any foreign interference,"
said Huang.

changes associated, with birth de--
'fects and carcinogens are sub-
stainces that promotegrowth of

L d

}.

cancer cells.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of I Edwards said the present law
Michigan. News phone: 764-0562. Second could result in a ban on the es-
Iclass postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich- Snilntin eeu naia
Igan 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor;snilntin eeu naia
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues- feeds. The proposed additional test
day through Sunday morning Univer- for teratogenesis "would lead to
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by serious immediate difficukies
carrier (campus area); $11 local mail'
(in Mich. or Ohio); $13 non-local mail since many essential nutrients and
(other states and foreign). other compounds would be ban-
Summer Session published Tuesday ned," he said.
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus Edwards said the all-or-nothing
area); $6.50 local mail (in Mich. or law should be made more flexible,
Ohio); $7.50 non-local mail (other allowing safe levels for use of ad-
t a editives in human foods.
ARE YOU POLISH?
Interested in Polish language and culture? Want to meet
other students of Polish descent at the University?
COME TO THE
1 UM POLISH STUDENTS CLUB
Thurs., Sept. 21; 7 p.m.-3540 S.A.B.
REFRESHMENTS!
For more info call: 764-0074

SHOP TONIGHT UNTIL 9:00
the wide leg!
the big cuff!
the A-1 baggy!
Flared in a b-i-g
way. ..3-inch cuffs
on 26-inch bottoms.
That's the only way
to go now. In blue
indigo pre-shrunk
14-oz. cotton denim.,
Worn with a ribbed
knit turtleneck.
29-36 waist sizes. $11.

0
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in the PEOPLE'S BALLROOM,
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TON IGHT'Sr,
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HELD DIAL
(Sponsored by UM Fraternities and Sororities) OVER 8-6416
AGAIN!
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the grimness of a German P.O.W. camp in winter to the lush-
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FOR THIS TRIP, ONE MUST FASTEN
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Tonight from 8:00 p.m. until closing, we will charge a WINNER 1972 CANNES FILM
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