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September 20, 1972 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-09-20

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THE ~MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, September 20, 1972

Page Eight

THE .MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, September 20, 1972

I

JUDGING TOUGH:

Thomas B. Roth, O.D.
ANNOUNCES THE OPENING OF HIS NEW OFFICE
FOR THE PRACTICE OF OPTOMETRY
AT
PINE VALLEY OFFICE BLDG.
SUITE 103
2500 Packard Rd.,
Ann Arbor, Mich. 48104

OFFICE HOURS
BY APPOINTMENT

PHONE
973-1990

TRANSCENDENTAL
MEDITATION
as taught by
MAHARISHI MAHESH YOGI
* NATURAL TECHNIQUE DEVELOPS FULL
CREATIVE ABILITIES
f PROVIDES DEEP REST AND RELAXATION
f LIFE EXPANDS IN FULFILLMENTt
INTRODUCTORY
LECTURE
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 20-8 P.M.
ANGELL HALL AUDITORIUM B
for further info. call 761-8255
BElT MIDRASH
PROGRAM IN JEWISH STUDIES
Late Registration All This Week
Cal 663-4129 or come to Hillel, 1429 Hill
Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday 6-7 P.M.
" Hebrew Language " Basic Judaism
(all Levels)
s Martin Bober: The
* Modern Hebrew and
Israeli Literature Philos
IPhUsoph
" The Jewish Ethical
Studies in Jewish
-The Ethics of Mysticism
Sexut The Jew in American
-The Ethics of Politics
Imprisonment . Flowers From Hell: A
* The Individual and Survey of Holocaust
The State Literature
P aft-a

By BOB HEUER
The 1972 Olympic Games, be-
gun amid the idealistic pagean-
try of competition, only to be
plunged into the stark reality of,
death, have mercifully come to
an end. Much was lost or over-
looked in the terrorism and
politicking that. marred the Mu-
nich games, including the per-
formances of 14 Michigan ath-
letes who competed for their
countries.
Five nations were represented
in swimming, diving, gymnas-
tics, and track competition by
Michigan athletes. The only
medals taken were by divers
Micki King and Dick Rydze and
swimmer Bill Mahoney.
King won a gold medal for the
United States on the three meter
springboard; while taking fifth
place in the ten meter platform
competition. Michigan's g o 1 d

medalist also has the distinction
of being the only woman station-
ed in the University's Air Force
ROTC unit.
King's teammate Janet Ely
finished fourth in both the spring-
board and platform events. Ryd-
ze, a 1971 Michigan graduate,
picked up the silver medal in the
ten meter platform.
Dick Kimball, Michigan's div-
ing coach and the personal men-
tor of King, Ely, and Rydze was.
also in Munich for the games. He
had nothing but praise for the
efforts of his trio, but was highly
critical of the Olympic judging,
citing continuous prejudice by
the judges against American div-
ers.
One of the flagrant violators
was an East German who per-
sonally coached twoiof the com-
peting divers. His decisions
placed East German girls one,

I I

ru b

medals

two, three in the springboard
event when they actually plac-
ed third, ninth, and eleventh.
King, who won the event placed
fourth on the East German's
list; while Ely, who took fourth,
could muster only a ninth place
finish in his estimation.
Kimball was also somewhat}
bitter over the judging in Dick
Rydze's event. "Dick didn't miss
a dive during the whole competi-
tion," noted Kimball. Dibiasi
(gold medal winner Claus Di-
biasi) missed two, one very
badly in the finals."
Rydze was also hurt by judges
from Italy, East Germany, and
the USSR, all of whom ranked
their own countryment ahead of
Rydze.
One change advocated by
Kimball would eliminate a judge-
from scoring a competitor from
his own country. Conditions be-
ing\ how they are, however, the
pressure of some American jud-
ges might also even things up.
Michigan's third medal winner,
Bill Mahoney, a 1971 Michigan
grad, swam to a bronze medal
as a member of Canada's 400
meter medley relay team. He
swam the breaststroke leg of the
race.
Other Michigan swimmers to
compete included Peru's Juan
Bello, a classmate of Mahoney,
who finished seventh in the 200
meter individual medley, and
junior Jose Aranha who finished
fourth and fifth in the freestyle
legs of two relays. Aranha just
missed qualifying for the 100
meter freestyle event, placing
ninth in the semi-final heat.
Byron McDonald, Mike Whita-
ker, and Bill Kennedy represent-
ed Michigan on the Canadian
swim team. McDonald who grad-
uated last spring, took sixth in
the 100 meter butterfly. Breast-

Gridde Pickings
Now boys and girls. This is your seventh grade University of
California test for mental immaturity, to be completed before midnight
friday. Please keep your pants down until all instructions have been
given.
Please answer all the questions in part a before proceeding to part
c. Omit part b. After completing part d, fold up part c so it will fly
20 feet. Do five push-ups. If you are over 6-8 and 240 pounds, omitI
parts a,b,c and d and report to Johnny Vooden at Popeye Pavillion. He
has already taken the test for you.
However, if you are not that big proceed to part e. Attach two
extra-strength napkins and Mr. Pizza will be there with two large pizzas.
Enjoy.
Part f and the pizza will come up momentarily.
1. MICHIGAN at UCLA 17. Bowling Green at Miami in
(pick score) Ohio
2. Georgia Tech at MSU 18. Pittsburgh at Air Force
3. Notre Dame at Northwestern 19 Stanford at Duke
4. Washington at Purdue Boston State at Hofstra
5. USC at Illinois
6. Colorado at Minnesota
7. Oregon St. at Iowa
8. Texas Christian at Indiana F

strokers Mike Whitaker, a senior
this year and former Wolverine
Bill Kennedy failed to qualify
for their final heats.
Michigan trackmen Godfrey
Murray and Kim Rowe compete-
ed for the Jamaican Olympic
team. Murray saw his hopes for-
a medal go down the drain when
he lost his first heat of the 110
nieter hurdles.
"The competition wasn't that
stiff," said Murray, "but I
made some stupid mistakes. My
race was early in the morning
and I really wasn't ready phys-
ically or mentally."
Murray had not hurdled com-
petitively since the Jamaican
Olympic tryouts, due to his coun-
try's boycott of all the pre-Olym-
pic meets.
Rowe ran the fastest leg of
his team's 1600 meter relay at
45.3 seconds. The team finished
fourth in its heat, with only the
top three qualifying for the next
round.
T h r e e Michigan gymnasts
qualified for the Canadian Olym-
pic team. None however actual-
ly got to compete in Munich. Pi-
erre Leclerc and Richard Bi-
gras were left home when the
Canadians decided not to bring
their full complement of play-
ers to the games.
The third qualifier, Bruce
Medd, broke his finger while
practicing and was unable to
enter the competition.
PURDUE FALLS:
IFu -mble,
By CHUCK BLOOM,
"That's the way the ball
bounces" sounds like a tired
cliche, but in the case of the Pur-
due Boilermakers, it rings home
with much 'truth.
Last Saturday's loss to the
Bowling Green Falcons resulted
from eight bad bounces of the
pigskin; three of which resulted
directly in Bowling Green's
scores.
Using the wishbone offense for
the first time, the Boilermaker
backs fumbled the ball away six
times to the considerably weaker
Falcons.
"We played awfully bad," said
Purdue coach Bob DeMoss. "We
were out-coached, out-played,
out-everything. They were alert
and we weren't."
Purdue, however, was without
two starters on offense. Halfback
Darryl Stingley had been side-
lined with a bad ankle and was
considered one of the keys to the
Boilermaker wishbone. Quarter-
back Gary Danielson, nursing a
sore shoulder recen'tly operated
on, was withheld from the opener
due to lack of contact.
Danielson's timing is not right
yet so we started (Bob) Bobrow-
ski. We didn't go into the game
planning to pass. We wanted to
move the ball."

I

AP Photo
AFTER THE shocking setback at the hands of Bowling Green, the
Purdue Boilermakers will again play host this weekend, this time
to a touted Washington Huskie squad. Bolstering the Huskie kickoff
team is Calvin Jones (20) who ran this kick back for 40 yards in
last week's 14-6 triumph over Duke.

1

9. Syracuse at Wisconsin
10. Georgia at Tulane
11. Navy at Penn State
12. Clemson at Rice
13. Lafayette at Colgate
14. Kentucky at Alabama
15. NorthCarolina St. at
North Carolina
16. Mississippi at South Carolina
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Bowling Green opened the
scoring on a touchdown pass by
Reid Lamport following an er-
rant Purdue handoff on their
own 20 yard line. The Boiler-
makers gathered their poise and
posted a three-play 66-yard drive
for a touchdown with fullback
Skip Peterson racing to-paydirt
from 40 yards out.
After Purdue held the Falcons
on the next series of downs and
regained possession on a punt,
the Boilermakers fumbled the
ball away on the very next play
at their own, 19. The Falcons
moved the ball down to the sev-
en of Purdue and had a second
down and goal to go situation.
As Lamport rolled out, he was
jarred by the Purdue defense,
thus loosening his grip on the
ball. The ball squirted into the
end zone some six yards away
and a Falcon lineman fell on it
for the touchdown.
Purdue struck back to knot the
game, 14-14, at half-time on a
17 yard scamper by Otis Arm-
strong.'
After a scoreless third quarter,
the Falcons again capitalized on
Purdue's misfortunes in the final
period.

puto me.
The Boilermakers had Bowling
Green pinned deep in its own
zone with a fourth down punting
situation on the Falcon 17. Mid-
dle guard Greg Bingham put on
a fierce rush on punter Ed Mc-
Coy forcing him to kick the ball
straight up in the air. Since the
pigskin had not crossed the line
of scrimmage it became a free
ball, and it bounced amidst three
Boilermakers back into McCoy's
hands and he scampered to his
38-yard line for a crucial first
down.
The Falcons then proceeded
to cross the 50 the only time in
the contest andsdrove down to
the Purdue 12-yard line.
Freshman Don Taylor, who
had yet to attend a class, booted
a 17-yard field goal that proved
to be the winning margin.
Statistically, Purdue, outgain-
ed the Falcons 244 yards to 212.
Most of the Boilermaker attack
was on the ground where the
wishbone gained 204 yards rush-
ing. But the statistic that hurt the
most was the five lost fumbles
and one interception.
DeMoss was extremely disap-
pointed in his offense. "I am
disappointed in the breakdown in
the backfield timing. It did not
run like the practices we've had.
- We had no clue to such bad ball-
handling then. Last Saturday the
wishbone ran like it was the first
time we had scrimmaged."
DeMoss learned last Saturday
that ball possession meant a lot
in football; the lack of which
meant defeat.
Human Rights
Party
OpnMeeting
Thurs., Sept. 21
7:30 p.m.
304 S. Thayer
(across from Hill Aud.)
Plans for HRP vs.
McGovern debate
Free ride-call: 761-6650
Child care available

THE
Bach Club
presents
THURS., SEPT. 21 8:00 P.M.
SOUTH QUAD, West Lounge
DUO: Fealey/French Renaissance to present

/

A

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by
Moderate flare, flap back pockets, wide belt
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double knit of 100% Dacron* polyester. $19.00.
100% DACRON* DOUBLE KNIT!
*Du Por't's registered T.M.

WJ~VA

I

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