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September 15, 1972 - Image 9

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-09-15

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Friday, September 15, 1972

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page

Nine

9

Friday, September 1 5, 1972 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page

ANNUAL STORY:

- . n I

L

Rugby popularity4widens,

By CHUCK DRUKIS-
While most people will be
cramming their way into Michi-
igan Stadium this fall for an aft-
ernoon of Boone's Farm, girl
passing, and watching from the
endzone microscopic football
huddles, the Michigan rugby
football club will be playing a
no commercial-time-out contest
on Palmer Field.
The ruggers, having turned
down opportunities of playing in.
the stadium, have decided to
schedule their games on un-
bleachered Palmer Field, thus
allowing the fans to be on top of
the action with the autonomy to
follow the play.
In the past ten years, the pop-
ulgrity of rugby has grown to the
extent that most major colleges
in large cities have teams.
Yet, with football at the topof*
the heap as the national pas-
time, why the revival of rugby?
Rugby flourished as much as
any other sport in the early part
of this century. But then the in-
dustrial revolution seized the ex-
citement and hearts of America.
New. activities with anti-Euro-
peon origins gained popularity
-strongly supported by the phi-
losophy that American ideas
were superior. Consequently
evolved a stepchild of rugby -
American football.
But as with other segments of
the industrial sector, the en-
vironment became polluted.
Money replaced sport. As sport
fans' are again beginning to rea-
lize the essence of sport,trugby
has become a viable alternative.
Rugby was born in 1823 at Rug-
by College, England. During a
soccer game William Ellis disre-
garded the rules of soccer by
picking up a bouncing ball and
carrying it across the goal for
a score. Probably for the best,
history has not recorded the
comments of Ellis' opponents.
The purpose of rugby is to
score, much like in football. The
ANN A R B O R CIVIC
THEATRE needs Set'De-
signers for the 1972-73
Season. If you are inter-
ested in designing one of.
the following, Anthing,
Goes, The Lion In Winter,
Thieves' C a r n i v a lor
Prime Of Miss Jean Bro-
die, call Alice Crawford
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eves. 663-8864.

action however is a lot differ-
ent. There is no halt in action
after a tackle and forward pass-
es are not,. permitted. The ball
can only be advanced by running
or kicking. Passes may only be
lateralled to the side or the
rear. Blocking is illegal.
There ore fifteen players on
each team. Usually each team
is divided into eight forwards
and seven backs. The football
f an wopld find the. positions con-.
fusing, but ., some comparison
is possible if one looks at the
positions during a set scrum-.
mage.
The first row of three forwards-
consist of ohe-prop on each side
and a hooker in the middle. This
can be compared to the require-
ments of 'gua'rds and a center.
The second row .is made up of
a wing forward on each end.
pushing in'at an angle, with two.
second row forwards in the mid-
dle. They.are somnewhat like two
ends and, tackl s, and provide
75 per cent, of.the forward thrust.
of the scrum. ,
The final row is simply the
number eight,. who can best -be.
compared to a linebacker.
The back who stays near the.
scrum and -receives the ball is
similar to a split-T quarterback,
and is known ,as the scrum half.
He controls 'play to some extent,
especially when the ball is
thrown into the scrum.

Angling back from the scrum
are the standoff; the inside cen-
ter, the outside center, and the
right ,and .left -wings. They, .are
all like halfbacks, while the rug-
by fullback acts as a safety man
who often saves the day with an
open field tackle or a kick back
into the opponent's territory.
The game begins with a kick-
off. When the player with the
ball is tackled, he must release
::the ball. Immediately, the .for-
wards from both -.teams will
gather around -the ball,.Leach on
his side of an imaginary- lire of
scrimmage. The purpose, of this
-action, which is -called' a- loose
ruck, is to hurl the ball-back to
your own scrum half who will
pick up the ball and head up
field.
However, when a -tackle is
--above to be made, -he w*4 pitch
t.b al tback to a following back
-who- will continue the play., Once
a tackle is made., the forwards
' mst once again ,try to get: the
ball out. Y
.Tlxe game cgnsists. of two 40-
minute halves with no time outs.
The referee may- t lis discre-
tion decide when -to stop the
play~ to remove an injured player
, from the field. If a player is un-
able to continue, the team. plays
a -man short, since no substitu-
- tions are allowed during any
part of the game.

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