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September 12, 1972 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-09-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Tuesday, September 12,1972

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page, Seven

Tuesday, September 12, 1972 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Seven

A NEW COURSE IN PEACE RESEARCH
"Introduction to Peace Research:
Methods and Models in the Quest for a Warless World"
Political Science 491, Section 0360! 4 Hours Credit " No prerequisites.
The course will meet from 7 to 9 on Tuesday and Thursday evenings,
Further information is available in 4549 L.S.&A. Bldg.-or come to the
first meeting on Sept. 12 at 7:00 p.m. in B-116 Modern Languages Bldg:
Sponsored by the Peace Research Applications Group and
the L.S.&A. Student Government
Advising Instructor: PROF. J. DAVID SINGER, Dept. of Political Science

PUSHERS BLAMED

Drugs plague

(Continued from .tPvge 1I
At night, downer users began
feeling the bad effects of the
combination, causing a situation
which - in the words of one Drug}
Help worker - was "incredibly
heavy."
At times, the Drug Help tent{
was filled to well over its 12-per-
son capacity with people who hadj
overdosed - largely on downers.
In at least three cases involy-
ing downer overdose, persons were
rushed to University Hospital in a
near-coma state. As Drug Help
patients are anonymous the condi-
tion of those taken to the hospital
remains unknown.
Many observers credited the
*work of Drug Help and the Psy-
chedelic Rangers with keeping
things under control.
The Rangers combed the crowd;
with red-coned flashlights search-;
ing for overdose cases and trying
to track down dealers. Drug Help
volunteers worked through the

night tending - to troubled drug
users.
Concert promoter Peter An-
drews had praise for both groups
yesterday.
"Drug Help was excellent," he
said, "and I would say the Rang-
ers cut down the drug traffic by at
least SO per cent."
Police Chief Walter Krasny con-
firmed Andrew's judgment calling
the concert "well organized and
fairly well behaved.",
"The Rangers," Krasny said,
"tried their best to get people
dealing drugs out of circulation in
a hurry. You just can't complete-
ly control such a large mass of
people."
The increased use of downers in
conjunction with alcohol created
special problems for Drug Help
workers.
"It's more of a medical prob-
lem," said Gary Rogow,. (who
helped run the Drug Help tent.)

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SUBSC

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festival
"With acid you have to spend a
lot of time with them (overdose
cases) but you know after a while
it will be OK. With downs there's
really nothing we can do. If it's
bad enough we have to take them
to the hospital."
Why did the downer problem
hit so hard at the blues festival?
Theories abound. Rogow lays
much of it to what could be termed
a "Saturday night psychology."
Many people, he said, thought
they could take as many drugs as
they wanted to because they had
all day Sunday tosleep it off.
Others place the blame with so-
ciety, and the drug companies.
"People are so depressed that
they just don't care what they do
--they just have to get high," one
festival worker commented.
Ultimately, the blame is most
often laid at the feet of the deal-
ers , concert organizers had at-
tempted to exclude.
"That's thecmain problem," a
woman who worked the Drug Help
tent Saturday and Sunday nights
said. "So many people are into
making a whole lot of money, and
they just don't care what they are
doing to other people."
Voters back
bomnb hikes
in Indochina,
NEW YORK P)-A Louis Harris
poll of voters reported yesterday!
that they isupport continued heavy
bombing of North Vietnam by a
55-32 per cent margin.
The poll also reported a 64-22
per cent margin in favor of min-
ing North Vietnamese harbors.
A 74-il per cent majority sup-
ported President Nixon'sconten-
tion that "it is important that,
South Vietnam not fall into the!
control of the Communists."

L d

PINBALL

ouse unit refuses
to abolish KP details
WASHINGTON 1-Funds to abolish KP and military cleanup
details were rejected by the House Appropriations Committee yester-
day, and the Pentagon said the decision would make it harder to
create an all-volunteer Army.
The committee cut $125 million out of the programs to hire civilians
for kitchen work, cigarette butt policing and barracks chores in the
Army, Navy and Air Force.
Calling such details "wholesome and character-building duties"
for GIs, the committee also recommended the civilian programs be
terminated by next April 30.
Deputy Defense Secretary Kenneth Rush called the committee's

comes to

Call 764-0558

PACKARD & STATE!
TOMMY'S
holiday camp

LSA grants
awards to
Four University faculty members
were honored yesterday by the
literary college.
Receiving the college's spdcial
awards were: Far Eastern lan-
guages and literature Prof. Shuni-
chi Kato, the Class of 1923 Award;
classical studies Prof. Gerda Selig-
son, the Williams Award for Out-
standing Teaching in the Humani-
ties:
Journalism Prof. Paul Jess, the
Ruth Sinclair Award in Freshman-
Sophomore Counseling; and history
Prof. Gerald Linderman, the Ruth
Sinclair Memorial Honors Program
Award.
The Class of '23 Award, which
carries a $1,000 stipend, was given
Kato for "his lively interest in
students and their individual in-
tellectual problems and his devel-
opment of imaginative teaching
methods."
The Williams Award, which also
has a $1,000 stipend, cited Prof.
Seligon's "dedication to her stu-
dents, her outstanding example to
future teachers."
The Sinclair Award in Counseling
has a $500 stipend and recognized

action regrettable and expressed
hope Congress would restore the
funds.
He said it will make the transi-
tion to an ail-volunteer force "much
more difficult."
"I think we need the maximum
attractions to get the type of all-
volunteer force that we're after,"
he said.
All three services have already
started hiring the civilians as a
key part of the drive to make
military life more attractive to
young men in an effort to achieve
President Nixon's goal of an all-
volunteer military by next June
30.
But the House committee called
the programs too costly and said
the services started them with no
studies to determine their effect
on military discipline.
It also said the services have no
studies to back up their claim that
young men consider the chores
menial and degrading.
"The committee is of the opinion
that such duties do not detract
from the serviceman's image," it
said in a report.
"As a matter of fact, the com-
mittee believes that these are
wholesome and character building
duties which enhance a service-
man's pride in the services."
DRINK LOTS OF BEER
WIESBADEN, Germany (A'P -
The average West German drank
136.7 quarts of beer in 1971, an
increase of more than three quarts
per person over 1970, the Federal

I

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for people
who walk
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The specially engineered sole imitates
walking on sand barefoot, and forces
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fatigue and the aches and pains caus-
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A plralty f 4 to35 er cent.
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Saigon, if it were the only way to students as individuals and his Statistics Office reported.
get peace. It was the widest plu- special skills in helping students to Total consumption of b
rality on that question since March, develop realistic and meaningful 2337.9 gallons, up 3.4 per ce
1971, Harris said. educational plans." 1970.

eer was
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THE CAGE IS COMING
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Everyone

Welcome!

NERVOUS
aboUt coming to the big U?
The way to make friends is to get involved!
JOIN
and MEET PEOPLE
" BUSINESS STAFF-You don't have to write to
work on a newspaper.,
" EDITORIAL STAFF-Be at the scene as the
news happens.
" SPORTS STAFF-Meet the players and the coaches.
MASS MEETING

FI0UH

GRAD
COFFEE
HOUR

Wednesday, Sel
8-10 p.m.

pt. 13

West Conference
Room, 4th Floor
RACKHAM
OUTSIDE ON THE TERRACE

Fun, Food, People
NEW PEOPLE WELCOME!

..
__

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Univ. of Michigan Center for
Russian and East European Studies
INVITES YOU TO A LECTURE BY
Ted H. Friedgt
Professor of Russian Studies
The Hebrew University of Michigan
oan
The Democratic Movement" in the Soviet Union-
Views of Soviet Intelligentsia
Tues., Sept. 12-4:10 p.1n.
200 Lane Hall
KOSHER KO OP
Student-run cooperative dining
$145 semester
$1.75 meal-Fridays and Saturdays

4ZIDT~kAR9:D 1)

2 P l4 I

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