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January 20, 1973 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-01-20

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t-age Eight

THE MICHIGAN-DAILY

Saturday, January 20, 19 /:j

r~age Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY ~aturday, January 20, 19 Li

Action on credit

it

ii

by exam slow

(Continued from Page 1)
At present the faculty chairper-
sons are in favor of permitting
credit by examination only for un-
dergraduate LSA students. How-
ever, some want to leave the pos-
sibility open in the future for other
University units to participate.
Language departments are par-
ticularly interested in whether
they should allow a foreign stu-
dent to come to the University and
rack up an impressive number of
credits in his native language.
Faculty members are also won-
dering if students should receive
a grade for a course taken credit
by examination. If not, and credit

by examination becomes pass/fail
should failures be recorded on
transcripts. In addition it was ask-
ed how many times a student who
has failed an exam may be allow-
ed to retake it.
LSA faculty committees and in-
dividual departments hope to solve
these problems over the next few
months.
Another variable entering into
current discussions is Regental
blessing oftthe original measure.
According to Richard Kennedy,
secretary for the University, the
Regents do not have to formally
approve the measure, but want to
check out some of its implications

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at their February meeting.
"The Regents were somewhat
dismaved by press coverage of the
issue in certain outstate newspap-
ers which indicate credit by exami-
nation would revolutionize the pro-
cess of obtaining a college degree,"
he said.
Kennedy believes the Regents
are aware of the more limited
scope of credit by examination and
are favorable to its overall con-
cept.
Although nothing concrete has
been accomplished on the depart-
mental level most departments are
gearing up machinery to formu-
late individual programs. Many de-
partments will allow student input
on questions concerning the
amount and types ofccourses to be
offered.
Chemistry Dept. Chair-
nan Thomas Dunn says that a
chemistry curriculum and policy
committee composed of students
and faculty will begin work soon
on credit by examination. He per-

nation will alleviate current over-
crowding in certain introductory
chemistry courses. "Even if only
a few take chemistry 114 or 225
credit by examination it could
lower enrollment and would im-
prove the classroom and lab en-
vironment", Dunn said.
Professor Gerhard Weinberg,
history dept. chairman, said a his-
tory curriculum committee com-
posed of three faculty members,'
two graduate students and two
undergrad students is looking into.
courses and exams that would be
relevant to credit by examination.

Water al
"A COMEDY THAT A., INIELLIGENT
W I L L MAKE YOU CO tDY WITH SOME
LAUGH CRYIT \OF TH ! CLEVEREST
COULD BE THE BIG HIT IAES IN YEARSE.T
OF THE NEW SEASON." - T7E S'RPRISE COMEDY
-Detroit Free Press T F THE YEAR,."
A A. News

:7

Y

5th HIT
WEEK!
PG

44 Al k
w0 NEM. M-

DIAL 662-6264
OPEN 12:45
Showsat 1, 3
5, 7, 9 P.M.

AP Photo
NEW YORK COPS wearing bullet-proof vests, dive behind a
squad car during a shootout last night with gunmen holed up in
a sporting goods shop.
Cops, gunmen battle
on streets of N.Y.
NEW YORK (AP)-Police laid siege to a sporting goods store in a
Brooklyn slum last night after they said a band of gunmen opened
fire from inside. One patrolman was killed and three wounded.
Police said at least four gunmen were holed up, with seven to
15 hostages
The hostages were believed to be employes and customers trapped
inside John and Al's Sporting Goods shop when a patrolman in-
terupted a holdup in progress at the store.
The slain officer was mowed down during an attempt by the gun-
men to shoot their way out of the store with the hostages.. Police
gunfire drove them back inside.
Officials said the bandits had access to "an arsenal" of shotguns
and high-powered semiautomatic hunting rifles which the store
stocked for sale to sportsmen.
An attempt was made by police to telephone the gunmen inside
the store. But the telephone lines had been cut, either inside or
outside.
The scene of the shootout was Williamsburgh, one of several
dismal Brooklyn slum areas. Another is Brownsville, and between
them they flank Bedford-Stuyvesant, whose 400,000 population makes
it the largest black community in the nation except for Chicago's
South Side.
D.C. protest readied
(Contineufstormhtg1) tional co-ordinator Sidney Peck
(The Associated Press reported said more than a million persons
that several members of PCPJ signed the petitions and the sam-
paid a peaceful call on the White pling brought to Nixon contained
House yesterday to deliver peti- 50,000 signatures.
tions demanding that Nixon sign a Meanwhile, a "C o n c e r t for
peace agreement with North Viet- Peace" with Leonard Bernstein
nam "immediately." PCPJ na- took place at the Washington
____. Cathedral last night. The concert
was planned to coincide with the
official inaugural concert at the
Kennedy Center. The counter-con-
cert featured Haydn's "Mass in
lobb in D .Time of War" while Tschaikov-
obby Hi u . . sky's "1812 Overture" was played
at the official event.)
(Continued from Page 1) Preparations for Nixon's formal
group for nearly an hour, on fairly inauguration are p r o g r e s s i n g
amicable terms. ( smoothly. Security is expected to
He read to them a letter he be airtight, especially around the
wrote to President Nixon, express- Capitol Building itself. Nixon will
ing Brown's dissatisfaction with review the inaugural parade from
the President's war policies. a two-story bullet-proof enclosure
Brown said that he was .distress- in front of the White House built
ed about the heavy American especially for today's ceremonies.
holiday bombing, what he felt was (Around the nation, counter-in-
Hanoi's intransigent attitude at the augural events are planned for to-
peace talks, and the White House's day, according to the AP.
official silence on the conduct of Organizers in Miami, Fla., plan
the war. a march to that city's Federal
Asked by Spitz if he would spon- Building to protest the war and
sor anti-war legislation to cut off the Pentagon Papers trial of
funding for the war, Brown replied Daniel Ellsberg.
that he would wait to see how the The Detroit Coalition to End the
current peace negotiations pro- War Now plans a rally at Ken-
ceeded. nedy Square this afternoon and
House Minority Leader Ford was Jane Fonda is scheduled to speak
visited by five others from the Ann to a rally on the steps of the State
Arbor group. While congenial, Ford Capital in Sacramento, Calif.
refused to discuss the war issues Other state capitals expecting
with the group, claiming he was marches are Topeka, Kan., Phoe-
privy to confidential information! nix, Ariz., Montgomery, Ala., and
on the progress of talks. St. Paul, Minn.)
BACH CLUB -
present in a BACH CLUB BENEFIT
JUAN SERRANO
Hill Auditorium-8:30 Thurs.
FLAMENCO GUITAR
Jan. 25-Tickets $2.50 at the door
or Ann Arbor Music Mart,
Discount Records (S. Univ.)
The most remarkable film
I have seen this year.
-Arthur Schlesinger Jr.

Women s studies0
(Continued from Page 1) courses on Lesbianism, The Theoryc
titled Research on Women, to be of Martial Arts (Karate) a n dc
given in February. There is also Feminism and Marxism.a
a series of "outreach projects"- According to Judy Stacey, a fac-o
a series of non-credit mini - cours- ulty member at Richmond, theres
es for alumnae and other interest are currently 12 majors in the
-ed women. Kleiner indicated that field, with a total enrollment of 200
this was part of the desire "not in the women's courses. Students
keep information limited to the have a high degree of authority in
University community." the administration of the program,
Women's studies programs at including the hiring and firing of
other colleges and universities dif- staff.
fer widely in both content and The most sophisticated of all the
style. They range from a loose programs is that of Sarah Law-
federation. of related courses to rence College in Bronxville, N. Y.
the more structured degree pro- While it does not offer an under-
grams. graduate degree in Women's Stu-
The University of South Florida dies, it does have a Master of Arts
typifies the conventional women's program in women's history.
studies programs. "We have tra-
ditional courses, as far as any-Set
studies" said Juanita Williams, di-S
rector of the program.
South Florida's 12 women's eases term s
courses include a basic Introduc-
tion to Women's Studies, Women
and Social Changes, and Psychol- (Continued from Page1)
ogy of Women. The most popular withdrawal of North Vietnamese
course, according to Williams, is troops from the south appeared to
the interdisciplinary Human Sex- be partly satisfied by the agree-
ual Behavior. ments wording on the demilitarized
The State University of New zone.
York at Buffalo has a more free- The South wants the zone be-
form program. There are 30 wo- tween the two Vietnams recog-
men's courses listed with the Wo- nized as a de facto border, thus
men's Studies College, part of the prohibiting the interference of one
schools collegiate system. The Vietnam in the affairs of another.
system resulted from a student Tin Song speculated that South
strike two years ago. Vietnam's final decision will be
The program's more unusual given to Nixon's special envoy
courses include Auto-mechanics, General Haig when he returns to
Child Care Centers and a special Saigon tomorrowafter visiting
section 'on the Married, Divorced Cambodia, Laos and Thailand.
and Widowed Women. Their more Tin' Song said the government
traditional courses include Woman was taking a "moderately optimis-
in Literature, and Woman and Her tic attitude" on a settlement. Thisj
Image in the Fine Arts. Also in- contrasted with official discourage-
cluded in their curriculum is a ment in the past few days of specu-
course entitled Black and Female. lation about imminent peace.
The program, however, has run Although the White House has
into trouble. According to a wo- virtually admitted that peace in
man on their co-ordinating com- Vietnam is just around the corner
mittee "we are facing a crisis. -after four and a half years of
Buffalo's administration has turn- negotiations and two decades of
ed conservative and the collegiate war-it refused to yield on specu-
system as a whole has come un- lation during the past week that
der fire." The program may lose an agreement will be preceded by
its funding and be forced to cur- a ceasefire, perhaps this weekend.
tail some of its more free-form as- Presidential spokesman Ronald
pects. Ziegler said Hanoi and Washington
Other schools have begun to had agreed not to discuss the sub-
award degrees in the field of wo- stance of the negotiations while
man's studies. Some, like San they were still going on and he was
Francisco State College, offer ma- sticking to that position.
jors with a concentration in Wo- It was understood that points
men's Studies, while others offer need to be cleared up, not only in
full degrees in women's studies. the main text, but also in the
Richmond College has the most details of the protocols by which
militant and political d e g r e e the accord would be administered.
granting program. Richmond, a-_-_
junior - senior two year school, is
part of the City College of New 603 east ib y
York.
Placing less emphasis on the " C H A
more traditional aspects of wom- M C IGAN
en's studies, the program offers The__r__P__ne_66_429_
Theote Phne 66.629

sonally believes credit by exami-
COMING
TUESDAY &
THURSDAY
9:30 P.M.-MODERN
LANGUAGES AUD. III
4 ;
The late OTIS REDDING, "caught
at the height A his considerable
art" (Life magazine) in "Mon-
terey Pop," fimh record of the
legendary 196 ,\lontercy Inter.
national Pop Festik al
NEW WORLD FILM CO-OP
761-8522

l
r
i

SAT.
DON'T KNOCK
THE ROCK
BILL HALEY & the
Comets bring the Rock
'n Roll to their hometown.
Vive Les Fifties!
SUN.
H ITCHCOCK'S
39 STEPS
His most famous movie.
Masterful combination
of irony and suspense.
MON.
Richard Nixon
Festival
7-8:30-10 p.m.
ARCH ITECTURE
AUDITORIUM

UAC-DAYSTAR PRESENTS WITH WNRZ
David Bromberg
IN CONCERT, also, Terry Tote

I

"The most exciting talent to emerge from the Vil-
lage since Dylan."
---Rolling Stone
"An eclectic, rowdy, slightly lunatic genius."
-Michigan Daily
Wed., Jan. 24, Power Center, $2.50
TICKETS:
MICHIGAN UNION SALVATION RECORDS
11-5:30, Mon.-Sat. 10-7 p.m. Mon.-Sat.
ONLY 140.0 SEATS IN POWER CENTER!

also on sale now:
LUTHER ALLISON, MOJO BOOGIE, this
SATURDAY NITE-HILL AUD. $4-3.50-3.00

II

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Read Daily

Cl

lassif ieds

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SPEED READING
GUARANTEE: D o u b I e your
speed with the same compre-
hension in three lessons.
TOTAL COST: $15
CALL
MICHAEL THORYN
769-5034
experienced independent instructor
2nd year on campus
COME TO
MASS MEETING
U of M Riding Club
Tuesday, Jan. 23
7:30 p m.
University Club Lounge
761-9555

I

H ELL,
UPSIDE
DOWN
"
Who will
survive-in one
one of the
greatest escape
adventures ever!

I

1
t
t

PANAMSOrtC cOLRBYDEWXE PG
Soon: "SOUNDER"

i

to celebrate their
New Heavenly Blue
IS PLAYING
3 DANCE CONCERTS a nite
Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday
Chess sets available for your leisure

*S

j

Sot., Sun. and
7 P.M.

41

1

lI **'-',l s Uili"" fi &- .

I

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