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January 18, 1973 - Image 6

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Michigan Daily, 1973-01-18

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

I

Thursday, January 18. 1973

Po~e Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY

HRP MASS MEETING
For the first time the Human Rights Party is having
a primary to select its candidates for the City Coun-
cil and mayoral elections.
Come to the Mass Meeting to discuss the need
for guidelines for candidates in the Feb. 19th
primary.
r PUBLIC LIBRARY
Thurs., Jan.18 MICHIGAN UNION
FRI., JAN. 19 IS THE LAST DAY TO
REGISTER TO VOTE
at City Hall for the Feb. 19 HRP Primary
BRING THE SUNLIGHT OF TRUTH
INTO YOUR WINTER AT U of M
Attend the Meetings of
The Christian Science Organization

JOURNEY NORTHWARD

'41

Skier

,.-.,.

1:15 p.m. Each Thursday

3545 SAB

By MARK RONAN,
Records, as the axiom solemnly
declares, are made to be broken,
and skiers, though they occasion-
ally manage to fracture things
other than records, naturally
strive to attain their share of
athletic renown. An aggregation
of local skiers, the Michigan Ski
Racing Team, a group associated
with the sports club program, have
established a not inconsiderable
reputation in the field of ski racing.
First formed in the fall of 1970,
the club, under the auspices of
president Jim Byrnes, now num-
bers approximately 60 members.
Since its inception the team has
dedicated itself to active participa-
tion in intercollegiate racing. Pre-
parations for the present racing
season began last autumn with
various sports and calisthenics in-
tended to provide the necessary
physical conditioning vital for com-
petitive skiing.
Appearances to the contrary,
winter is upon us, and so the ski
racing season is well under way.
The Michigan team, in full pursuit
of its central interest, is now com-
peting in two leagues.
One league, a minor league of
sorts, is a loose confederation of
teams representing the hallowed
seats of higher learning in south-
eastern Michigan. In addition to
Michigan, the represented schools
include Eastern Michigan, Wayne,
State, and Oakland University
among several others. This associa-
tion is known as the Michigan In-
tercollegiate Skiing Association, a
division of the Midwest Skiing As-
sociation. League competition un-
folds weekly at such local ski
areas as Alpine Hills and Mt.
Brighton.
THURS. JAWLARYK 1
FREE I N STRUCTiON l
UNION -1-9 PfM

0
Ps vie for State Cup
However, the races sponsored by women skier on the team, broke for it is generally accepted that
the U.S. Ski Association provide her ankle on her first run, and that this race determines the unofficial
the principal form of competition. understandably cast a pall over a; state champion.
The names of the schools taking generally dismal Saturday. Never- To a great extent, the teams
part in this league read like a theless, at the conclusion of Sun- from the lower peninsula must re-
litany of the great and small: day's competition several team sign themselves to the domination
Michigan Northern, Michigan Tech, members had garnered individual, of Michigan Tech and Northern
Ferris State, MSU, Central Michi- trophies and the team secured a. Michigan. Evidently one can do
gan, Eastern Michigan, Grand second place finish in the giant more in the Great North than
Rapids J. C., and lest we forget, slalom. watch the snow accumulate, play
Ohio State, a decided non-conten- Once again a northern race cards, drink, and watch more snow
der, the downhill chaser of the awaits the skiers this weekend. In accumulate. One can also ski.
league. a real sense this is the "Great Snow, hills, and skiing coaches be-
Last weekend the ski team en- Race," the race for the Governor's come profusely abundant as one
tered a large northern race at Cup. The victor is the king of nears the Artic Circle where skiing
Walloon Hills, and for a time life Michigan collegiate skiing, or per- is considered a varsity sport.
was grim. Lori McDonald, the best haps the designated heir apparent, Despite the inherent inequities,
Michigan has ably demonstrated
its skiing power in the past and
Wilmore named week's best; promises to be a formidable power
once again.
Shorter gets Sullivan AwardtThose travelingtnorthwardon
Sh rt rthe men's"A" team are Don
Willis, Gary Edwards, Gunnar
By The Associated Press Ludwig, Pat Munson, and Bill
O CHICAGO-Henry Wilmore, Michigan's reliable scoring star, has Henckley. Women skiers will be
been named the Big Ten's basketball player of the week by The Connie Ruth, Deb Lewis, Ann Zio-
Assoiatd Prss.bron, and Deb Lewis (a rare coin-
Wilmore, who has carried the scoring burden for Michigan the d no I error
__--- _- .-,_-_- Michigan State Central Michi-

THIS WEEK'S TOPIC
Was Man Created Perfect?

--... - ---- ---
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in Co-ops
North and Central Campus
Male and Female Openings
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APPLY 3-N Michigan Union'
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past two seasons, was called upon last Saturday and he responded
brilliantly to lead the Wolverines to a 78-71 victory over rival Michigan
State at East Lansing.
Wilmore finished the game with 26 points but with the score tied
53-53, he went on a scoring binge which allowed the Wolverines to
coast the rest of the way.
* * .*
* GAINESVILLE, Fla.-Olympic marathon race winner Frank
Shorter was named winner of the Sullivan Award yesterday as the
nation's outstanding amateur athlete of 1972, and said he hopes to
repeat his gold medal run in 1976.
Shorter, a second year law student at the University of Florida,
was chosen for the honor by 1,500 sports writers and broadcasters in
a poll conducted by the American Amateur Union (AAU).
4 LAFAYETTE, La.-The fight for more time to prepare a defense
against charges of recruiting irregularities against the University of
Southwestern Louisiana apparently has moved into state courts.
Attorneys for the university said yesterday they have talked with
representatives of the National Collegiate Athletic Association-which
has leveled about 125 charges at the school-and they have agreed

*LY flALt:1 gd l U~t%, %'&ALLfdi IVII 111 A
gan, and Michigan are the team of
special talent and promise among
the southern schools, and this
weekend's competition may bear
witness to team treasurer Gunnar
Ludwig's belief that the Michigan
team "is close to the best in the
lower peninsula."

Doily Photo byDAVID MARGOLICK
NEIL FEGEBANK (15) lofts a rare shot in Iowa's game against
Michigan. Like all Iowa games, the Hawks were in it to the end.
Iowa's season has been marked by late minute losses.

DROP THRILLERS:

Losses dim Iowa hopes

that federal courts have no jurisdiction.
* *

*

* PHILADELPHIA-Husky Mike McCormack, a protege of Paul
Brown, the late Vince Lombardi and George Allen, took over yesterday
as head coach of the National Football League's Philadelphia Eagles.
The 6-foot-4 McCormack signed a three-year contract to try and
lead the Eagles out of the football wilderness. Philadelphia finished last
in its division in 1972 with a 2-11-1 record and hasn't had a winning
season since 1966.

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- By DAN BORUS
Most Big Ten cage mentors are
agreed that to capture the title
outright a maplewood squad can
afford but three black marks in
conference play. Any more chalk-
ed up in the loss column and a
team will find itself dwelling in
less fashionable heights.
But, Iowa coach Dick Schultz
wants to know, what do you do
when you've knocked last year's
conference champ from the ranks
of the unbeaten in your first game
and by the fourth you are on the
verge of elimination from title
competition.
To date the Iowa saga has been
one of the saddest in the Big Ten
and stands as witness to the fab-
led ruggedness of Big Ten intra-
conference play. After whipping
Minnesota in their inaugural Big
Ten contest, the Hawkeyes have
lost three in a row, the last two by
the slimmest of margins. In all
of their three losses, the Hawks
were in the thick of it all the way,
only to find an opponents' surge
knock them out at the final buzzer.
The Illinois game, lost last Sat-
urday by the Hawkeyes, was set-
tled in the last 11 seconds and the
winning rally last Monday was
notched by Michigan State's hot;
handed Mike Robinson with but
one second left on the clock.
But luck is not the only ele-
ment that has turned the pre-sea-

son hopes of Hawkeye partisans
sour. Coach Schultz has a couple
other complaints to add to the list.
"We don't get consistent output,"
he exclaimed. "At times, we are
brilliant, others we let down."
An example of Schultz's point1
was brought to full view in the dis-
satisfying contest against the Illi-
ni. After Illinois had converted a
pair of charity tosses, eleven sec-
onds, time enough for a good shot,
remained to play. Guard Dick Rob-
inson, an excellent outside shooter
as well as a superb ball handler,
travelled and the Illini had the
ball game cinched.
"Our turn-over rate is just too
high," says Schultz. "You can't
give the ball away 13 times in one
half (as the Hawks did against
Michigan) and expect to be in the
ball game."
Another problem has been the
Iowa schedule - a proverbial back
breaker. After opening against
Minnesota at home, the Hawkeyes
travelled to Michigan for a Mon-
day night contest. The following
Saturday found the Hawkeyes in
Champaign. And if that wasn't
enough for the Hawkeyes, they
had a Monday night engagement
with much improved Michigan
State.
"I was one of those who opposed
Monday - Saturday play," said
Schultz, "and with good reason.
The period is just too short to re-
cover and' turn in a good game."
On the casual glance, Iowa has
the material to crack the top of
the Big Ten. Except for the cor-
ners, which are a little weak, Iowa
can boast of fielding three class
ball players.
At the low post, Kevin Kunnert
roams with great abandon. The
seven footer ranks fourth in the
Big Ten in scoring, parading a
24.5 points per game figure. His'
rebounding is just as superlative,
as he has been playing along at a
14 bounders a game clip.
Last season, Kunnert was a bit

gawky as most big men tend to
be. He did not maintain control
of a game in the same way he does
now. Michigan's Johnny Orr
claims that Kunnert is "much im-
proved. Perhaps the best big man
we have faced."
The backcourt, which feeds the
big man, is just as talent laden.
Sporting Rick Williams and Candy
LaPrince, the Hawkeye guard con-
tingent must be the envy of every
coach in the league.
Williams is a pure shooter with
a fine touch around the hoop. He
has an ability to drive and is not
afraid to stick the opposition with
a well placed pass or two. Unfor-
tunately for the Hawkeye rooters,
Williams has hit a cold streak of
late and is noteven listed among
the top twenty scorers in the Big
Ten.
Joining Williams in the back
court is a junior college transfer
with the magical name. Candy La-
Prince, who played his prep ball
with Michigan's Henry Wilmore, is
another fine shooter. He and Wil-
liams combined for enough long
jumpers to give the Gophers fits
in the first showdown between the
traditional rivals.
In the corners the Hawkeyes
send Neil Fegebank and Jim Col-
lins to do battle. While neither is
an outstanding shooter, both play
fine defense and continually draw
tough assignments in the forward-
dominated Big Ten.
Backing up the forwards are
Reggie Vaughn and Glen Ange-
lino, who rip the nets at a 5.2 and
4.0 clip respectively. Playing at the
high post, neither has been awe-
some.
Another part of Iowa's problems
is connected to their inability to
play on the road. Boasting an as
2-4 record overall on foreign courts,
the Hawkeyes are 0-2 in confer-
ence in that department.
But things could be looking up
for the downtrodden Hawks. A
rest is coming up, their schedule
eases up a bit, and the law of
averages suggest that the famine
in point production from their
guards won't last forever.
If the team goes on losing, there
will be a lot of surprised pundits
and a lot" of disappointed Hawk-
eyes.

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. Opportunity for involvement
in community projects
. forum for sharing ideas
Come to the course meeting on
Tuesday, January 23 from 1-3:30 p.m.
Room 3510 SAB
For further information call
WENDY SUSS 662-0450 or MARCIA RADIN 663-0120
God is perfect and pure
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energy cannot be created
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To have knowledge of
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