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January 09, 1973 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-01-09

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, January 9, 19 1:5

fi-IE MICHGAN DAILY Tuesday, January 9, I~I.i

VOTE 8-3:
City Council passes
anti-bias ord inance
By GORDON ATCHESON "I agree with the ideas of tf
After lengthy debate, City Coun- ordinanceebut thetonus should n
cil passed an ordinance designed be put on newspapers. Newspape
to end discrimination based on are very timely and can not 1
sex, race, and other factors in burdened with checking classifi
various types of classified adver- ads," said Benner.
tising. The ordinance, however, alloy
The ordinance, formulated by the the publishers of classified adve
Human Rights Party (HRP), pro- tising to check any potentially d
vides no classified advertisements criminatory advertising with t
concerning employment or public city's Human Rights Commissi
accommodations may discriminate before publication.

lot
rs
be
ed
er-

Postill sets low priority
on pot law enforcement

10

T

[A

SHO

F T RY=::

(Continued from Page 1)
Chief Walter Krasny took a dif-
ferent position on the issue. Krasny
said that since possession of mari-
juana was still a crime he could
not tell his men to turn their backs
on the problem.
This difference in attitude is re-
flected in recent actions by the
two departments. In the city, ac-
cording to Krasny, a number of

Fourth Ward) was critical of the
Postill announcement. "The mari-
juana problem is really far more
serious than most peoples realize.
I'm surprised to hear Mr. Postill
describe it as his lowest priority."
Under current state law, the
maximum penalty for possession
of marijuana is a jail sentence of
ninety days plus a fine of $1,000.
City law establishes a maximum

against persons because of their
sex, race, religion, national or-
igin, sexual preference, or educa-
tional association.
Council passed the ordinance by
an 8-3 vote. Council members
Bruce Benner (R-Fourth Ward),
Richard Hadler (R-Fourth Ward),
and L l o y d Fairbanks (R-Fifth
Ward) cast the dissenting votes.
"The ordinance is a step in the
right direction although it is by no
means a solution to the problem,"
Council member Norris Thomas
(D-First Ward) said in support of
the legislation.

During a public hearing on t
ordinance, representatives fro
four women's rights organizatio
voiced strong support for t
measure. "This ordinance has con
about because of the women's ma
movement," added Council mer
ber Nancy Wechsler (HRP-Seco
Ward).
Council also passed a resoluti
proposed by Thomas declari
MartinLuther King's birthda
Jan. 15, as a day of peace, justic
and love in memory of the m
and his unfinished task.

is- the arrests for marijuana have penalty of 90 days plus a $100
he been made when officers investi- dollar fine for the same offense.
on gating other crimes have found it City Council passed an ordinance
Postill said that his department last spring lowering the penalty to
he has also turned up marijuana in a five dollar fine, but it was struck'
)m investigations, but no convictions down Sept. 29 by District Court
ns have been sought on the drug Judge Sandorf Elden. The city is
he charge. appealing Elden's ruling.
me Community reaction to the Postill - -
ss announcement was predictable. A
m- spokesman for the R a i n b o w
nd People's Party commented, "Of,
course we applaud the action, but
on we are still skeptical. We are go-
on ing to wait and see how it works
out in practice before making a
ay, final judgment."
ce The Rainbow Party was strongly
an opposed to Postill's candidacy last
fall. A number of party members
were particularly incensed when
the Human Right's Party decided
not to run a candidate against him. ATTENTIO
Councilman Bruce Benner (R.-

i

BElT MIDRASH-PROGRAM IN JEWISH STUDIES
" HEBREW-All Levels
" Modern Hebrew & Israel Literature
" Basic Judaism
Existenial situation of the Jew today, Sinai and Auschwitz, secularism & religion, Israel and
the Diaspora, toward an authentic Jewish life style.
" Contemporary Crises in Jewish Law
War-Peace, C.O., medical ethics, sexuality, responding to panhandlers on the Diag.
" Yiddish Literature in Translation
Sadly tragic yet beautiful way of life in the shtetl
4 Israel: A Survey of Contemporary Issues & Problems
Political Parties, Arabs in occupied territories, kibbutz, etc. etc.
" The Social and Cultural Anthropology of Jews & Judaism
Who is a Jew? Is Judaism a cultural system? Role of Israel in Jewish Identity.
" Jewish Heretics
Role of heresy in Jewish thought, relationship of heretics to the Jewish community, rebellion,
against God as an affirmation of faith.
" The Holocaust: A StIpdy of Selected Problems.
American foreign policy, the Vatican, resistance, role of women, the survivor syndrome.
" The Jewish People: Statehood vs. Religion
The Place of the Second Temple in Jewish History.
" The Hassidic View on the Existence and Purpose of the
Universe: An Introduction to Jewish Mysticism
Mysticism as a way of life.
s God Talk: Studies in Jewish Prayer and Worship.
Classical and Hassidic prayer texts; is God talk prayer possible today?
" Art in Israel

CUE presents sweeping
course reform program

(Continued from Page 1)
guage requirements-is based on a
questionnaire distributed to 1,088
LSA students in February, 1972.
In the survey, students were ask-
ed to indicate the reasons for en-
rolling in certain courses and
whether the courses made a posi-
tive or negative contribution to
their education.
Some of the survey results indi-
cate that when a student is forced
to take a course the positive edu-
cational contributions are lessen-'
ed. Many students also indicated;
that there should be more options
to choose from in fulfilling the
various requirements.
Nearly all the students ques-
tioned urged the elimination of
the language requirement. Some{
suggested increasing the options to
include courses in foreign cultures,
linguistics, mathematics and com-
munications. Other students sug-
gested devoting a completese-
mester to the study of a foreign
culture, learning and using its
language.
In the spring of 1969, after
months of student demonstrations
Daily Classifiel

and protests over language re-
quirements, the University estab-
lished a new degree called the
Bachelor of General Studies (BGS)
which has no distribution and
foreign languages requirements.
CUE's plan would extend the
BGS' freedom from requirements
to all degrees.
The thrust of the study is that
students should be allowed and en-
couraged to take a well-rounded
and balanced selection of courses
but they should not be forced into
areas which they are not inter-
ested in. The study notes that
m o s t studentssindicated they
would "probably" or "definitely"
take courses in foreign languages;
and other distribution areas even
if they were not required.
The CUE study concludes that
"..students feel a well-rounded
liberal arts education is educa-
tionally positive, and something
most students would pursue on
their own." But students feel that
the present distribution require-
ments "not only are tied up withj
negative course experiences, but
they actually obstruct the pursuit
of a liberal arts education."

Jewish Community Service
4
Students wanted for challenging training
and career opportunities in American Jew-
ish Communal organizations. Scholarships
and placement assistance available.
Information: Jonathan Entin, Hil 663-4129

PEACE RESEA
IS AT HAN

RCH
ID
498
Research

Political

Science

REGISTRATION: Tues.-Thurs., Jan. 9-1 1 7-9 p.m. at Hillel, 1429 Hill
Co-Sponsored: Hillel and The Midrasha College of Jewish Studies of Detroit

(663-4129)

Models and Methods in Peace

Student Instructors and guest lecturers including
PROF. J. DAVID SINGER, KARL DEUTSCH,
and ANATOL RAPPOPORT
Tues. and Thurs. 7:30-9:00 p.m.
B-116 Modern Languages Building

* In the Warsaw ghetto the Nazis put all the Jewish scholars to work making shoes so that the shoe factory
became a major center for Jewish learning.

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