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April 18, 1973 - Image 9

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-04-18

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%A/ dnesdoy, April 18, 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nl ne

Wednesday, April '18, 1973 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page N~jne

ART '(ROT 4~
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Eastern Airlines stops planes
due to flight attendants walkout

:IAll J 'P l Eastern Airlines,
one of the nation's major car-
riers, cancelled all its flights last
night after flight attendant per-
sonnel walked off jobs.
A spokesperson at Eastern's
company headquarters in Miami
said there would be no Eastern
flights out of the 94 airports served
by the airline until at least noon
today.
The spokesperson said a resump-
tion depended entirely on progress
in contract negotiations with the
Airline Stewards and Stewardesses
Association (ALSSA).
"We shut it down," said Eastern
public relations executive James
Ashlock. "We've inconvenienced
passengers enough. We're not going
to schedule anything until noon
tomorrow and even that will de-
pend on negotiations."
Walkouts last night forced can-
cellations throughout the country
including airports at New York,
Miami, Chicago and Washington,
but Ashlock said the airline then
"moved the biggest pirt" of its
nighteflights with supervisory. per-
sonnel.
Ashlock said the walkouts oc-
cured although negotiations be-
tween the airline and the ALSSA
continued into the night in Wash-
ington.
Eastern initially called on the
approximately 4,300 employes rep-
resented by the union to stay on the
ob and Eastern President Samuel
ligginbottom said in Washington
that the strike was unauthorized.
A local representative of the

ALSSA, however, insisted the walk-
out was legal, although there was
no word from the union on why
members were picketing while
talks continued.
A strike by the union had been

set for midnight Monday, but av-
gotiators agreed to an 18-hour de-
lay which officially expired at 6
p.m. EST yesterday. The union
seeks a new contract covering
wages and working conditions.

Canadians charge U.S.
with peaee treaty breach

,Continied from Page 1)
nlitary crisis.
A minor cabinet reshuffle has
been expected for several weeks as
Lon Nol consolidated his power
under the recently - declared state
of national danger but Hak's resig-
nation move came as a complete
surp-rise to observers.
A complex round of political
bhrgaining is now expected to fol-
low within the ruling Socio-Re-
publican Party for seats in the
new cabinet..
1-l"k, is the party's secretary-
general and accepted the prime
minister's post last Oct. 15 and
formed his 16-member cabinet the
same day.
In further developments U. S.
officials yesterday said Monday's
bombing of Laos had no major
miilit'-rv objective, but rather was
intended as a demonstration that
President Nixon will not tolerate
rIlewed Cornmunist encroachments
on the Indochina ceasefire agree-
mwi cts.
They described the operation as
limited in nature and without stra-
tegic significance in contrast to
3a~e

the continuous and extensive air
raids now taking place in neigh-
boring Cambodia.
The bombing of Laos is not ex-
pected to be regular, according to
these sources. They said the raids
will not continue if Nixon is con-
vinced there are no further cease-
fire violations in Laos.
In radio broadcast's, however,
both the North Vietnamese and
the Laotian Pathet Lao insurgents
claimed the raids were unprovok-
ed and constitute "a brazen viola-
tion""of the cease-fire agreements.
A continuation of such acts, they
said, can only bring an increase in
hostilities.
The Nixon administration sees
the renewed fighting in Laos as.
tied to a growing trend by the
Communists throughout Indochina
to test the United States' will.
American analysts say thev feel
Hanoi wasn't convinced Nixon
would react strongly to its moves
once U. S. troops were out of Viet-
nam and American prisoners re-
turned.

poisons
pigeonts
ICointinued from Page 1)
de trov pets.'
Racy claims Avitrol only kills
an "occasional" bird. "For the
most part, it just chases them all
over," said Racy.
"-He said the spreading of Avitrol
feed on buildings is done on an
irregular basis, whenever he is
cornmissioned to perform such a
job during their regular"work
throughout the University.
"They probably had a different
company do it before us," said
Racy, "but it's, been done as long
as I've been here, at least two or
three years."
"We didn't do it for a while two
years ago because some students
printed an article about it," Racy
said.
OAKLAND, Calif. (UPI) -Al-
fonso Zapata may be the biggest
candidate for mayor of Oakland,
but his 90-pond advantage didn't
hell much in a scuffle at a city
council meeting.
Zapata, who weighs 270 pounds,
got in trouble when he hunched
his considerable bulk over the
speakers lectern, making it hard
for others to reach the microphone.
Patrolman Elwin C. Lamp, Jr,
a 180-pounder, ordered the candi-
date to sit down. A scuffle ensued
and Lamp came out of it with Za-
pata in a hammer lock. The police-
man quickly ousted him from the
cnambers.

Disabled students seek to
develop advocate office

Yearbook

OUR M AiN I IN EK ING
JAMES PRINGLE, a 35-year-old Scotsman, is The Daily's man
in Peking. That's because The Daily is the only Michigan
paper that subscribes to Reuter news agency. And Reuter is
the only English-language news agency with a full-time Pe-
king news bureau. If it happens in China, you read it first in

'72
for $2

MICH IGANENSIAN
Thurs., April

19

420 MAYNARD ST.

i
i
I

(Continued from Page 1)
ing as a "watchdog" over disibled
students as many programs at
other universities do, he hopes this
program will serve as a means of
pointing up the needs of the dis-
abled students.
The disabled student's commit-
tee, a subdivision of Student Gov-
ernment Council, consists primar-
ily of handicapped students. It has
mainly concerned itself with the
problems of handicapped students'
mobility created by architectural
barriers.
The curb cuts around campus
allowing easy access to the streets,
are a significant outcome of the
committee. Fifty to 70 more of
these curb cuts are scheduled to
be constructed this summer.
The main problem so far bas
been contacting disabled students
ocampus to discover what they
feel is needed to establish equal
opportunity for handicapped stu-

dents. Walker has a partial list of
dispbled students on campus, yet
the list is not completely accurate,
as there are many more handi-
capped students on campus with
whom the office cannot contact.
Walker. encourages disabled stu-
dents to contact him at 7634182 to
discuss problems they have had,
or problems they foresee for the
disabled student.
There are already five advocates
in existence; the advocate for edu-
cational innovation, the women's
advocate; black advocate, gay ad-
vocate, and the native American
advocate. Another advocate being
proposed along with the disabled
student advocate is a Chicano ad-
vocate.
According to Walker, the pro-
posal for the disabled student's
advocate must be submitted to
Office of Student Services Vice
President Henry Johnson for ap-
proval on or before June 30.

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