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April 14, 1973 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-04-14

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Page Two

]-HE MICHIGAN DAILY

:)oturd ay, April 14, 1913

I

P a g e T w o H E M C H I A N D I L Y a t u r a y , A p ri 1 4I1 1

Run-of

MAYORAL RACE

expected

in

Oakland;

Seale called 'leading contender'

1 I
this. KOorKM
$2.00 8:30
FRI.-SAT,
Diana
Ma rcovitz

4r

OAKLAND, Calif. (4) - Repub-
lican Mayor John Reading says
Black Panther Party chairman
Bobby Seale is the leading con-
tender against him as he seeks
re-election in Tuesday's city elec-
tions,

Scale, who was helping organ-
ize the Panthers when Reading
first took office in 1966, is expected
to attract enough votes to force
a runoff with the white incumbent.
"The man who usually gets
elected as Oakland mayor does so

BOBBY SEALE, chairman of the Black Panther Party, rides a rush hour bus in Oakland, California
as he campaigns for votes in his bid to unseat incumbent Mayor John Reading. Oakland voters go
to the polls on April 17, and Seale is now considered a front-running contender.
NT TVIET CONG:
Caaians sayNorth Viets
downed truce force chopper
SAIGON, (Reuter) - A Cana- C o n t r o 1 Commission super- terday that the investigation had
dian member of the Vietnam vising the truce was working on its established that the helicopters
peace - keeping force said yester- report of the crash in which four were off course when they were
day there was reason to believe truce observers were killed when downed.
the North Vietnamese - and not their unarmed helicopter was hit At a five, hour meeting of the
the Viet' Cong - were responsible by a missile in Quang Tri pro- Control Commission yesterday, the
for shooting down a truce force vince. Canadian chief, Michel Gauvin,
helicopter last week. Five others also died in thew told the meeting that the Cana-
The charge came as an eight- crash. - dian team had strong reason to
man team from the International Well informed sources said yes- believe the helicopters were not
____________ ____shot down by the Viet Cong, but
by "troops whose presence in
- T South Vietnam is not provided for
or urgesC in the Paris agreement."
This appeared to observers here
to be a clear reference to North
to clarify bscenit rule Vietnamese soldiers.
In his statement, which was re-
leased to the press after the meet-
WASHINGTON (P) - ,The National Cable Television Association ing. Commissioner Gauvin said:
is urging the government to promptly clarify rules which have re- "We have strong reason to be-
sulted in obscenity being broadcast over some cable TV public a'ccess lieethat otherparts ofSouth
sultd I obceniy. ein bradcat oer omeVietnam as well as in the area
channels. - where the helicopter incident took
Under rules laid down last year by the Federal Communications place, North Vietnamese troops
by te Fderl Comuncatonsare stationed in, or are infiltrat-
Commission, cable TV systetns in the major markets must provide ing, South Vietnam for the pur-
public-access channels free for individuals to present what they want pose of militarily supporting one

Crash halts research
MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. (.' - The destruction of a unique flying
laboratory in a two-plane crash will have "very serious effects" on
National Aeronautics and Space Administration research programs, a
NASA official said yesterday.
The $5 million four-engine Convair 990 was packed with more
than $1 million worth of scientific equipment when it exploded into
flames Thursday after colliding with a Navy aircraft above a golf
course while approaching the Navy's Moffett Field.
A joint NASA-Navy investigation was announced yesterday to
determine cause of the crash which killed 16 scientists, technicians
the crew aboard the planes and critically injured one man. A Navy
admiral said human error appeared to have been at fault.
"It will have a very serious effect on our program," said Dr. Hans
Mark, director of NASA's Ames Research Center here.
"It was one of the major programs at Ames. It hurts our pro-
gram badly. We do not have another aircraft to carry on its work. It
was unique,"he added.
The craft - named "Galileo" after the pioneer astronomer -
participated in a join U.S.-Russian survey of the Bering Sea last
month. It measured the sea's temperature, salinity, roughness, the
age of ice and water in the atmosphere. It was scheduled to chart
the patterns of whales and other sea mammals.
"It would be impossible to go ahead with the project that stems
from Bering Sea exploration with the Russians," Mark said.
As NASA's only Convair 990, "Galileo" was used to chase solar
eclipses, chart atmospheric and ocean currents and to develop pro-
totype instruments for use in aircraft and spacecraft.
Rear Adm. Herbert S. Ainsworth, commander fleet air wings,
Pacific, told a news conference at Moffett yesterday:
"Some one made an error, of course. It does not ,appear to have
been a mechanical malfunction. There was no indication of any trou-
ble in either plane prior to the crash."
He said both planes were under tower control at Moffett when
they collided #nd plunged piggyback onto Sunnyvale Municipal Golf
Course. I

on the basis of the low turnout of
black voters," Seale said in an
interview.
"John Reading and those like
him have been elected when at the
most 60 per cent of the black vot-
ers participated," said Seale. "We
can beat that. We've got the best
machine in town."
The Panthers have worked hard
to register more blacks and have
organized transportation to the
polls.
The city's 400,000 population
measured in the 1970 census in-
cluded 34.5 per cent blacks and
9.8 per cent Mexican-Americans.
Seale's campaign manager, Her-
man Smith, estimates that 55,000
of 175,000 registered voters are
black, 20,000 Mexican - Ameri-
cans and 100,000 other whites.

leading contender," Reading, 55,
and Republican, said in an inter-
view.
At a recent forum of the four
candidates, the mayor described
Seale as a "worthy opponent who
has run an admirable campaign-
conducted his campaign with dig-
nity and earned my respect."
The likely outcome of Tuesday's
vote is that neither Reading nor
a challenger will win the required
majority of the total vote. The
contest then would go to a May 15
runoff between the two top can-
didates.
Seale and the Panthers have
conducted an old-fashioned cam-
paign.
"The people see me as one who
wants to end their exploitation,"
Seale said. "That's the real, be-

A field of eight candidates for ' yond-the-surface image. That's the
mayor include four rated as ser- one that really counts."
ous candidates for the nonparti- Reading said he is basing his
san job. campaign on a record of attract-
They are Reading; Seale; a ing new business and new jobs to
white city councilman, John Sut- Oakland.
ter; and a black businessman, Oakland, across the bay from
Otho J. Green. Seale, Sutter and San Francisco, voted overwhelm-
Green are registered Democrats. ing against Richard M. Nixon last
"As of now, Bobby Seale is the ' November,
Join The Daily Ad Staff
Phone 764-0558

SINGER-SONGWRITER
"BRIGHTEST NEW FACE
IN MANY MONTHS"
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141 til STREET

A

THOSE KIDS FROM
"SUMMER OF"42" ARE BACK!
Shows
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without censorship. This has created a dilemma for cable operators.
Cable subscribers in a few cities are being offered late-night
"adult film festivals" that occasionally present X-rated fare. One
system recently showed the controversial film "Deep Throat,"
But the main problem has been raised with public access chan-
nels, notably some fare carried over New York's Manhattan system.
The association's board, meeting here this week, adopted a reso- I
lution noting the "apparent conflict between current regulations and
laws prohibiting censorship and the legal obligation to prevent the
transmission of obscene materials."
The Federal Communications Commission recently announced itj
will hold a closed-door inquiry into possible broadcast of obscenity by
cable TV systems and by television stations.
The industry's board resolution endorsed the pre-screening of
material on access channels to eliminate "offensive" programming.

of the two parties in South Viet-
nam."
Gauvin pledged that the Cana-
dian delegation would do every-
thing possible to establish the
truth concerning the incident.
The Michigan daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 704-0562. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan. 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier (campus area); $11 local malI
tin Mich. or Ohio); $13 non-local mail
(other states and foreign).
Summer Session published Tuesdayc
"rough Saturday morning. Subscrip -
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
area); $6.50 local mail (in Mich. or
Ohio); $7.50 non-local mail (other
states and foreign).

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VIRGIN S

I N__________

I

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