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April 13, 1973 - Image 9

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Michigan Daily, 1973-04-13

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. Friday, April 13, 1973,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Berge Nine

Friday, April 13, 1973 YHE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Nine

Seeds

& Stems

RANGERS ROLL ON

-I

(Adventures in

a 0 a

. . . Baseball mediocricv
Dan Borus -
OTHER SPORTS EDITORS regale you with predictions of
v+which teams are going to finish first in this year's pennant
races. This is elitism of the first order. For every four teams
which manage to squeek through to post-season competition,
there are a full twenty - five times as many - which straggle
home in the beginning of October, bereft of honor and praise,
with visions of pop-ups dancing in their heads.
For most baseball players of the time, the pennant race is
incidental. For too many, indeed, the issue seems to be "are we
good enough to make it all the way to fourth?" In this spirit,
recognizing the futility of their quest for excellence, allow me
to tell you now - six full months in advance - which teams
are going to finish fourth in their division, so that you won't get
nyour hopes too high if you're rooting for them.
In the American League East, a solid case could be
made for placing any of its six so-so teams in the middling
fourth slot. But the clear choice, the mediocre apotheosis
of a mediocre milieau, has to be the Detroit Tigers.
Age is but one of many factors which contributes to the Ben-
gals' decline. To this mst be added the Detroiter's uncanny
knack for concentrating their extra-base hits at moments when
the bases are empty, the inability of their starting rotation to
pitch shut-outs every. day, and the fact that the team's high
fielding average stems in part from the Tiger fielders' inability
to get ground balls other fielders could make errors with.
Mickey Lolich would have overshadowed Steve Carlton
last year if he had had a team as good as the Phillies to back
him up; Joe Coleman's success is almost as mystifying as Witt-
genstein, and the Michigan Avenue plethora of designated hitters
looks like it's going to hit about as much as Woodie Fryman. But
you can't say Our Heroes are exactly over the hill: precipice
would be more like it.
Billy Martin should say fifty Hail Marys each'evening, in
eternal gratitude for the existence of the Cleveland Indians and
the Milwaukee Brewers.
The American League West offers a more clear-cut pic-
ture. Texas and Minnesota are going to be terrible, while
Oakland and Chicago are going to be good, which means
there should be a real dog-eat-dog battle for the coveted
fourth slot between the California Angels and the Kansas City
Royals.
California's chances for fourth place are severely handi-
capped by the presence of fireballer Nolan Ryan, erudite Bobby
Winkles, and worth-every-penny-of-his-six-figure-salary Frank
Robinson. The Royals, by contrast, managed to trade away a
bona-fide .300 hitter, Richie Scheinblum, in exchange for chron-
ically sore-armed (and wild) Wayne Simpson, who, along with
such worthies as Dick Drago and Bruce Dal Canton, gives the
Royals a pitching staff any other team in the league would be
proud to beat.
The Royals' sluggers score too often to lose all the games
they play: the problem is that they also give up too many runs,
and have a lock-hold on the league lead for men left on base.
It might be close, but Kansas City gets the nod.
The National League will most likely prove that its teams
can be as mediocre (if not more so) than the teams in the Junior
Circuit. Leading the pack in the Eastern Division will most likely
be the St. Louis Cardinals.
Once the pride of Rivertown, the Cardinals still sport some
flashy names and some up and coming stars. But it will be too
much coming and not enough up for the Redbirds this year.
Although Bob Gibson can still whiz 'em by and Lou Brock
can still make the basepaths his own private drag strip, the
Cardinals have more question marks than the White House
explanation of Watergate. The bullpen, which last year
couldn't put out a wet match, let alone a book burning on
the Diag or an eighth inning rally, should spend this year
watching balls fly over the new shortened fences at Busch
Memorial.
The left side of the Cardinal infield will be suspect on its
good days and Jose Cruz could be substituted for by either of
his no-talent brothers without leaving any telltale signs.
There'll be a great fight to see which team will be the Car-
dinal's counterpart in the West. Although Los Angeles and San
Francisco will give Atlanta a battle, the view from here is defi-
nitely the Braves.
Although the Braves ripped off the O's in the well-known
"Get me Earl Williams" trade and now have a catcher who
can catch a curveball, their infield is patchwork at best and
non-existent at worst. Henry Aaron, who'll provide sports-
writers with material for drivel, and a supporting cast fea-
uring Ralph Garr and Dusty Baker should be able to drive
in as many runs with their bats as they allow with their
gloves.
A recurrent Southern nightmare will be seeing Gary Gentry
being knocked out of the box only to be replaced by Danny Fri-
sella. It should be the longest summer for Atlanta since the
year David O. Selznick burned the place to the ground.
The Dodgers and the Giants are in a rebuilding mood, but the
Dodgers have the pitching and some veterans to boot. So despite
their poor start, the Dodgers could very easily sail out of medi-
ocrity into the heady heights of contention.
The Giants have a little less pitching, but the way their
kids have been stinging the ball, the Braves could well tumble
farther into oblivion, and that's just not whistling Dixie in the

dark.
So there you have it: the Cream of the crop of 1973 baseball's
also-rans. Next October, when YOUR team makes your home-
town sportswriters look like cretins and sycophants, remember
where you read it first.
M. E. C. H. A. presents
EL TEATRO CAMPESINO
de AZTLAN
"THE CHICANO FARMWORKER THEATER"
The Chicano Struggle
UFW Union and Boycott Efforts
MUSIC--PLAYS-SATIRE--SPIRIT
Sat., April 14 Hill Auditorium
U of M Camnpus- -8 P.M.
NO ADMISSION

Montri
By The Associated Press
BUFFALOY-The M o n t r e a l
Canadiens struck for four first-
period goals last night, then heldr
off the Buffalo Sabres to post a
4-2 victory and win their quarter-
final National Hockey League
Playoff series four games to two.
Rene Robert's goal at 11:41 of
the third period, spoiled Montreal
goalie Ken Dryden's bid for a
shutout in his 27th Stanley Cup
game over a three-year period.
Serge Savard started the Mon-

eal

eliminates Sabres

Flyers flaunt
(1a ilyVBLOOMINGTON, Minn. - The
.7 Philadelphia Flyers supported
Doug Favell's exceptional goal-
tending with a three-goal second
period and soared into the Nation-
al Hockey League semifinals for
NIGH'T EDITOR: the first time with a 4-1 victoryI
JEFF CHOWN over the Minnesota North Stars
last night.
d aGoals by Terry Crisp at 4:10,
period and a pair of insurance Ross Lonsberry at 16:42 and Dave ]
goals by Walt Tkaczuk boosted the
New York Rangers to a 4-1 victory

Schultz at 18:01 of the second
period rubbed out Minnesota's 1-0
first period lead. Lonsberry hit an
open net with 12 seconds to play
for the final 4-1 count.
The North Stars opened with a
power play goal, only their third
of the series in 37 chances, at 13:40
of the first period when Bill Golds-
worthy deflected in a shot by Doug
Mohns from the point with his leg.

treal scoring parade, getting the over the Chicago Black Hawks last
initial goal at 1:32 of the opening night in the opening game of their
period. Peter Mahovlich worked best-of-seven semifinal Stanley Cup
the puck to Buffalo goalie Roger series.
Crozier's left behind the net and Hadfield scored on a perfect pass
Frank Mahovlich outfought Paul from Jean Ratelle at 4:04 of the
Terbenche for control. Frank whip- final period and Tkaczuk clinched'
ped the Huck to Savard, just inside it with another goal at 17:45.
the Buffalo blue line, and Savard Tkaczuk then sent home a final
drilled it into the net. goal on an empty Chicago net at
Buffalo, until then and for the 19:35.
'next 30 seconds, played the Ca- Both teams started off cautious- 1
nadiens even, then let down. ly in the first period as the Black
The Canadiens took complete Hawks grabbed a 1-0 lead on a !
charge before the midway point goal by Pit Martin at 12:37.
AP Photo in the first period. Muray Wilson Martin took a drop pass from!
e question marks than the White and Guy Lafleur scored two goals Dennis Hull and fired from aboutj
e," quips columnist Dan Borus his within 80 seconds. 40 feet past Ed Giacomin.
ms. Here Ray Busse and Ted Size- . The lead, however, was short-
mpt in yesterday's 2-1 loss to the Black Hawks bombed lived. About 1 minutes.later Chi-
ie Mets is sliding, as Busse's throw CHICAGO - Vic Hadfield's tie- sgo defenseman Keith Mlagnu-
son was guilty of some sloppy
breaking goal early in the third stick handling and lost the puck
-to New York's Bobby Rousseau.
H ITLESS WONDERS ..,-'.*.***

''oday'inSports

"THE CARDINALS have mor
House explanation of Watergate
predictions for fourth place tear
more botch a double play atte
New York Mets. Harrelson of th
to first is late.

Batsmen visit Boilermakers
The Michigan baseball squad will travel to Purdue today for
the season opener of the 68th Big Teri campaign. Along with the
Blue's twin-bill, six other Big Ten teams will play double
headers today with defending champion Iowa playing Minnesota
tomorrow.
The Wolverines, with a flock of lettermen returning from a
team which led the league in pitching and hitting last season,
are rated on of the top contenders for the crown.
Michigan finished third last year and has practically every-
one back, including such hitters as Pat Sullivan, Mike DeCou
and Greg Buss. On the mound the Wolves have lettermen Pete
Helt and Craig Forhan with newcomers Ace Adams and Chuck
Rogers.
Racqueteers in tourney
The Wolverine tennis team will get its toughest test of the
early part of its season when it engages in a four-team meet to-
day and tomorrow on the campus of Southern Illinois. The netmen
will be taking on teams from Southern Illinois, Alabama, and
Missouri in the two-afternoon affair, with each squad taking on
one opponent Friday afternoon and the other two Saturday.
Alabama is the strongest squad Michigan will face before its
trip to the west coast in May. The 'Bama netters recently dis-
played their ability by ripping Michigan's top opponent in the
Big Ten, Indiana, by a 9-0 count. Southern Illinois is also a strong
tennis school, and the only midwest team which came even close
to the Wolverines last year, extending Michigan to a 5-4 decision.
Missouri is less highly regarded, but certainly no pushover.

Birds
By ROGER ROSSITER
Special To The Daily
DETROIT-Mickey Lolich's wild
throw on an attempted sacrifice
bunt by Baltimore Oriole second-
baseman Bobby Grich in the top
of the tenth brought in the only run
of the ballgame as the Orioles
downed the Detroit Tigers in extra
innings yesterday for the second
day in a row.
Lolich and the Orioles' Dave M'-
Nally had a classic pitcher's duel
going for nine innings with Mc-
Nally allowing only one hit, a fly-'
ball triple off the bat of Eddie

blank B
Brinkman that rightfielder Merv
Rettenmund lost in the sun.
Mark Belanger opened the tenth
inning rally for the Birds with
a looping lead-offsingle to left-
field. H~e then stole second base
before Rettenmund walked to put
runners on first and second with
no one out.
Grich came to the plate and laid
a bunt down the first base line.
Lolich fielded the ball, whirled,
and fired it into the dirt past third-
baseman Aurelio Rodriguez with
Belanger scoring on the play.
Lolich got out of further trouble
by getting Boog Powell to pop-up

engas
and Don Baylor to smack into an
inning ending doubleplay.
The Tigers had runners on first
'and second with two out in the
bottom of the inning when Grich
stopped an apparent game tying
single back of second base off the
bat of Tony Taylor, holding Rich
Reese at third.
Gates Brown then came to bat
for Rodriguez and lashed a 2-0
pitch from reliever Orlando Pena
right at Grich who scooped it up
and flipped to Belanger for the
force out to end the game.

Billboard
The University of Michigan
Volleyball Club will host the Mid-
western Intercollegiate Volleyball
Association championships start-
ing at 1:00 Sunday in the IM
building. Admission is free.
Teams providing the opposition
for Michigan include Wisconsin,
Michigan State, Purdue, Toledo,
Western Michigan, Oberlin, and
Kellogg Community College. Both
undergraduate and g r a d u a t e
teams will compete.
The Club won its last two
games in convincing fashion,
whipping Toledo and Oberlin. The
Club should be in a good position
to give favorites Purdue and
Kellogg a real battle.

I
I
t
{

Harry's rmySurplus
1166 BROADWAY, ANN ARBOR
(near Plymouth Rd.)

Major League Standings

American League
Last

Hail inore
Boston
Cleveland
New York
Dletroit.
ilvaukee
Kansas City
Chicago
California
Minnesota
Texas
Oakland

wV
4
0
W~est
4
itois

, fPct.
(0 1.000
0 1.000
3 .400
4 .333
3 .?.i0
? .000

,,
t
'I
.3

.667
.66;
.600
,250
,?0()

G E3
1 s
3
h},
('B
41.,

t'incinnati
ilouston
Atlanta
San Diego
Los Angeles

3
4
I

.y
3
4
5i

.600
.541
,400
'333
.164

New York a, Cleveland 0
Chicago 6, Oakland 3
Roston at Milwaukee, postponed
Baltimore 1, Detroit 0, 10 innings
Texas 4, Kansas City 0
National League
East

3
312
4

YOU MAY BE TAKING OFF FOR
THE SUMMER-BUT WE'RE NOT
HEALTH SERVICE is open year 'round, and whether or not you
take summer classes you are probably still eligible for medical
care. People enrolled within the previous 12 months may use all
Health Service facilities. There is a minimal extra charge for
"non-enrolled students." The Medical Clinic has a $5 fee and
the specialty clinicsrcharge $3 above their usual fees. Lab and
Pharmacy charges remain the same. Some clinics will be. on a
slightly reduced schedule, so check ads or call in for exact hours.
If you have a problem, complaint or suggestion about
Health Service, CALL

New Vork
Pittsburgh
Chicago
Mom eat
Phi ladel phia
St, Louis
San Francisco

WV L Pet.
4 0 1.000
4 0 1.000
2 ? .500
3 :~.400
1 3 .250
0 5 .000
Av'est
6 1 .357

Results
Fe ork ?, St. Louis I
,an Francisco 9, ouston 3
Montreal Philadelphia 3
Pittsburgh 6, Chicago 0
Atanta at San Diego
Cininnati at Los Angeles
WVA LL ADBE E
Handrade
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