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April 11, 1973 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-04-11

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Page. Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, April 11, 1973

PageTwoTHE ICHGAN AIL

WedesayFArir1, 91

Nixon proposes higher minimum

wage

WASHINGTON (A') - The
Nixon administration yesterday
proposed that the minimum
wage be increased from $1.60 to
$2.30 per hour over a four-year
period but requested a slightly
lower hike for teenage workers.
The request for a lower in-
creased minimum wage for ten-
agers drew sharp criticism from
Rep. John Dent (D-Pa.), chair-
man of the House Labor Sub-
committee.

Secretary of Labor Peter Bren-
nan, who opposed a youth dif-
ferential when he appeared be-
fore the Senate for his confir-
mation hearing last January
urged Congress yesterday to
adopt one.
"Since I've been looking into
this job I see a problem in youth
employment," Brennan told
Dent, who reminded him of his
Senate testimony.
At that time, Brennan had

Day care i the House
Rep. Patricia Schroeder (D-Colo.) brings her daughter to work yesterday to protest the administra-
tion's withholding of federal funds for day care centers.
PROTECTION SOUGHT
Klemindienst claims presidential
aides can't be forced to testify

Deduction approved,
WASHINGTON AP" - The Inter- treatments affecting any portion
nal Revenue Service ruled for the of the body are deemed to be
first time yesterday that expens- for the purpose of affecting a n y
es for abortions, vasectomies and structure or function of the body
birth control pills are tax deduct- and are therefore paid for medi-
ible, including the year 1972. cal care."
An IRS spokesman said the de- With respect to birth control pills,
decisions were made by IRS tech- the IRS ruled expenditures are also
nical staff without "taking into "an amount paid for medical care"
account moral questions." under IRS regulations.
"Although many persons object The ruling on abortion says the
to vasectomy and abortion on re- determining factor on a deduction
ligious or moral grounds," t h e is that the operation must not be
statement said, "the IRS is requir- illegal under state law.
ed to base its ruling on an objec -_____________
tive interpretation of the law"
A spokesman added that the rul- 603
ings could be controversial but
said, "we can't take moral ques-
tions into account." A
He said the ruling on abortions Theatre Phone 665-6290
would apply to abortions in clinics,
doctor's offices and hospitals, "as LAST 2 DAYS!
long as they're legal." TDYA ----
There is no ceiling amount in the ~Brr tOD anAT i a3- m-
IRS ruling for abortions or vasec- plete season for qoinq to the.
tomies. movies, as Garbo was."
But it was pointed out that only Pauline Kael, New Yorker
the portion of medical expenses ...
amounting to 3 per cent or more of
a person's income is deductible.
The ruling, said the abortion de-
duction is allowed under IRS regu-
lations which provide that t h e
"amounts paid for operations or, a
I.

said of teenage workers, "If they
are going to perform the same
responsibilities I do not see why
there should be any difference
in the rate'"
"I don't consider this your pro-
posal," said Dent of the new
recommendation, "but that of
an administration that shows lit-
tle concern for those who need
it most." Brennan remained si-
lent.
The youth differential issue
blocked an increase in the mini-
mum wage last year when the
House approved a bill containing
ohe and the Senate passed the
bill without it. A compromise
could not be worked out.
Dent said the new proposal
was a step backward because it
would apply a lowerhrate to
workers under 20 while only
those under 18 would have been
affected by last year's bill.
H o w e v e r, the administra-
tion would limit the reduced
wage to 13weeks for 18 and 19-
year-olds and to 20 weeks for

workers under 18. The rate
would be 85 per cent of the mini-
mum for the older youth and 80
per cent for the younger ones.
No more than six workers, or
12 per cent of an employer's
work force, could be hired at the
youth rate.
Brennan said such safeguards
would prevent abuse of the wage
differential and assure that
youths would not take jobs away
from adults.
The administration's wage in-
crease proposal calls for a rate
of $1.90 upon enactment, and
yearly increases to $2.30 in 1976.
The rate for farm workers, now
$1.30 an hour, would go to $1.50
upon enactment, then to $1.70,
$1.85 and $2.00 in annual in-
creases.
Another bill introduced by
Dent, and supported by organiz-
ed labor, proposes an immediate

increase to $2 and to $2.20 a year
I tr. It will also extend cov-
erage to approximately six mil-
lion not now covered, including
federal, state and municipal
employes and household domes-
tics. Brennan opposed any addi-
tion l coverage at this time.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged b,.sudeats at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0562. Second
Classps t ge paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Michianu 48104. Published daily Tues-
ay through Sunday morning Univer-
sit year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier <carnpusirea): $11 local mal
in Mich. or Ohio'; $13 non-local mail
(other states and toreign).
buxmmer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
ae);*$6.50 local mail (in Mich. or
Ohioi; $7.50 non-local mail (other
states and foreign).

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"OPENS TONIGHT! 8:00 P.M.!"
The University Players
Proudly Present
Aime Cesaire's
"THE TRAGEDY. OF'
KING CHRISTOPHE"
(The black ex-slave and cook
who became the King of Haiti)
APRIL 11-14
TRUEBLOOD THEATRE
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Tickets: $3.00, $2.00
Time: 8:00 P.M.
Trueblood Box-office open 12:30-8:00
(performance time)
Box-office phone: 764-5387
Dept. of Speech Communication and Theatre

WASHINGTON () - Atty. Gen.
Richard Kleindienst testified yes-
terday that under the constitution-
al separation of powers Congress
cannot compel anyone in the ex-
ecutive branch to testify or pro-
duce documents against the will
of the President.
BULLETIN
The New York Daily News, in
this morning's editions, reports
that Senate investigators have
found a witness who can cor-
roborate convicted Watergate
conspirator James McCord's
administration officials includ-
ing former Atty. Gen. John
Mitchell to the Democratic
headquarters bugging. The news
said the Senate panel is not yet
ready to disclose the name of
the witness.

would be struck down by the
courts.
Kleindienst said that under "the
sacred doctrine of the separation
of powers," the President was not
intended to be an instrument of
Congress and must have discre-
tion to determine what informa-
tion in the executive branch can
be made available..
The question also was raised of
whether a President could refuse
to permit an aide to testify if a
congressional committee was in-
vestigating criminal activities it

believed the aide had knowledge
even if he was not involved.
Kleindienst not only said a
President has this power, but also
told the committee that the pro-
per forum for the investigation
and prosecution of crimes is the
grand jury and the courts.
Kleindienst repeatedly empha-
sized that President Nixon, while
refusing to permit his aides to be
called before congressional com-
mittees for questioning, has said
they will appear if summoned by
a grand jury.

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