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January 17, 1973 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1973-01-17

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Wednesday, January 17, 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Wednesday, January 17, 1973 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

Marathon
plans to
} help center
In an effort to raise money for
organizations housed in the Wash-
ington St. Community Center be-
fore a fire there last December,
WNRZ-FM, the Ann Arbor Tribal
Council and the Community Cen-
ter Coordinating Council have an-
nounced plans for a WNRZ COM-
MUNITY MARATHON.
The Marathon, which will begin
Monday, Jan. 22, and conclude 28
hours later, hopes to raise funds
so that Ozone House, Drug Help,
the Free People's Clinic and the
Community Center Project can
move from their current tempor-
ary facilities at Canterbury
House to more permanent space
elsewhere in town, and so that
the People's Ballroom can be
rebuilt and officers constructed
for the various Tribal Council
Committees.
During the Marathon, WNRZ's
regular programming will be ex-
panded to include live interviews
with representatives from the af-
fected organizations and o t h e r
prominent members of the com-
munity, live broadcasts f r o m
three benefit-concerts which have
been arranged to take place dur-
ing the Marathon, and con-
stant pleas to listeners to call in
pledges of money, and/or equip-
ment.
The live broadcasts will orig-
inate from: Mackinac J a c k s
on Monday night with perform-
ances by Lightnin' and Radio
King and His Court of Rhythm;
from the Blind Pig on Tuesday
afternoon with the Mojo Boogie
Band and Diesel-Smoke/Danger-
ous Curves; and from the Odys-
sey on Tuesday night with Loco-
motion and Iron Horse Exchange.
All bands are donating their serv-
ices and the bars have agreed to
donate the entire cover admis-
sion charge to the Marathon
fund.
(WABX- Airwaves) - R i n g o
Starr, Peter Townshend, Keith
Moon, the Everly Brothers, Jack
Bruce and Stevie Winwood all
have parts in "That'll Be the
Day," a film starring Ringo and
currently being shot on the Isle
of Wight.
$. e

Steeleye Span
Folk from England
incorporates change

By TOM OLSON
Our British brethren have at
times suffered from an excess of
scruples about the corruption of
their noble heritage of folk mu-
sic by the vile influence of god-
less rock and roll. All too fre-
quent are the moments in the
albums of prominent English
folkies when one wishes the mu-
sicians had been less concerned
with absolute faithfulness to the
original, and more with making
music to interest today's listen-
ers.
Restraint and good taste are es-
sential to a successful piece of
music, but they can only take it
so far. What true believers cus-
tomarily refer to as the "under-
stated excitement" of unadorned
folk music is often so understat-
ed that it borders on the coma-
tose. Even if such albums did not
formally advise you that "THiS
ALBUM SHOULD BE PLAYED
SOFTLY," you probably got the
idea anyway that it was unheal-
thy for music to provoke any re-
action greater than polite foot-
tapping..
Which is all a shame, since the
genius of vintage folk music will

almost always survive the leav-
ening influence of a bit of the
pagan 20th century. It is just
such a relaxing of purism that
brings us two excellent new al-
bums from mother England: San-
dy by Sandy Denny (A&M SP
4371) and Below the Salt by
Steeleye Span (Chrysalis 1008).
While both albums make ob-
vious their creators' affection for
things natural and acoustic, they
reveal as well that neither are
afraid to employ occasional elec-
tricity and amplification when it
will improve a song. The gentle
beauty of acoustic strumming
and picking can be best savored
when contrasted with the stab-
bing, vicious noises that only
electric instruments can make.
And the throb of a pluged-in Fen-
der is all the more exhilirating
when it is used sparingly in an
otherwise acoustic context.
Since paying her folk dues sing-
ing and writing clean-as-country-
water music for Fairport Con-
vention, Sandy Denny has record-
ed both alone and with the Brit-
ish group The Bunch. She is not,
strictly speaking, unheard of in
this country, but merely unheard,

despite her powerhouse stature
in Great Britain. Sandy, her lat-
est, is as fine an album as we
could ask of her.
Although she wrote eight of the
ten songs on it, the album as a
whole is very much steeped in
the English folk idiom. Her melo-
dic gifts are consistently strong
and her lyrics are uniformly plea-
sant - mostly the stuff of olde
English balladry, salty sea spray
and maidens to be married. In-
strumentation throughout the al-
bum is full and imaginative, and
even when it threatens to be-
come slightly too moving, t h i s
flaw is only a minor distriction
from the overall excellence.
Sandy Denny's fabled voice is,
well, Sandy Denny's fabled voice,
and it stands up well to the com-
petition presented by her virt-
uous sidemen.
The production is altogether so
confident and professional and
the material so agreeable that
this record will surely appeal to
many outside the ranks of hard-
core Sandy Denny fanatics. Par-
ticularly worth listening for are
the somewhat spectacular open-
ing cut "It'll Take a Long Time"
and the dramatic "It Suits Me
Well".
Steeleye Span is similarly ac-
commodating to the interests of
those who enjoy folk music but do
not object to spiking it with a
touch of electricity. Their songs,
centuries old all, range from the
sweetly acoustic to the nastily
electric. Below the Salt is uni-
form only in its remarkable lis-
tenability, covering the thema-
tic spectrum from the sacred
(an unaccompanied Latin hymn
"Gaudette") to the profane (the
delicately bawdy "Royal Fores-
ter"). The group sees nothing
amiss in juxtaposing an electric
bass with a chorus of wooden
spoons, and the result is decided-
ly refreshing.
The individual cuts tend to
float in and out of one's m i n d
often enough that it is difficult
to specify the best one or two,
but "Saucy Sailor" and "Sheep
Crook and Black Dog" seem to
be two of the more enduring.

By JEFF EPSTEIN
Despite its billing as the ac-
tion film of the season, The
Poseidon Adventure is but a sog-
gy story with a blend of excite-
ment and depth possibly rivaled
by an episode of Diver Dan. The
movie hastily strings together a
series of well time crises, every
five minutes or so, that effective-
ly numbs the audience to any
tension or suspense the plot once
had in Paul Gallico's novel. Add
some of the most embarrassing
performances ever by a collec-
tion of distinguished Oscar win-
ners, and the total is an amaz-
ing lack of entertainment.
It is New Year's Eve on board
the S. S. Poseidon and, while the
passengers are enjoying a toast
to good health, the ship is about
to be broached by a 90 foot tidal
wave. After the catastrophe, and
after all the lead characters find
themselves in n e a r perfect
health, the band of intrepid so-
journers begins the arduous
climb up through the innards of
the ship, which is now upside
down in the water. Film's
fightingest father since Pat
O'Brien, Gene Hackman, leads
tov.
tonight
6:00 2 4 7 News
9 Courtship of Eddie's Father
50 Flintstones
56 Maggie and the-Beautiful
Machine
6:30 2 CBS News
4 NBC News
7 ABC News
9 1 Dream of Jeannie
50 Gilligan's Island
56Making Things Grow
7:00 2 Truth or Consequences
4 News
9 Beverly Hillbillies
7 To Tell The Truth
50 I Love Lucy
56 Zoom
7:30 2 What's My Line?
4 eFstival of Family Classics
7 Wild Kingdom
9 Irish Rovers
50 Hogan's Heroes
56 Consumer Game
8:00 2 National Geographic
I. 1
I 'I
rLocal
'' Poets
The Michigan
Daily Arts
Page is now
accepting
poetry for
publication.
submit work
Sto Arts Editor
k: c/o The Daily.

the collection of personalities
reminiscent of Katherine Anne
Porter's Ship of Fools. However
in this instance, they really are
a ship of fools.
Shelly Winters and Jack Al-
bertson are Manny and Belle
Rosen, a sweet elderly Jewish
couple. Mridst the calamity they
insist on making with the jokes
and testimonials like they were
Mr. and Mrs. George Jessel.
While on board they befriend a
sweet middle age haberdasher,
Red Buttons, who in turn be-
friends a sweet young singer,
Carol Lynley. Ernest Borgnine
befriends no one, and Stella Ste-
vens as his wife, the reformed
lady of the evening (this pic-
ture is PG) is exceptional look-
ing, which might have saved the
entire film. The director also
realized this fact and constantly
followed Stella during her peri-
4 Adam-12
7 Paul Lynde
9 It Takes a Thief
5ODragnet
56 How to Win the Nobel Prize
8:30 4 Bob Hope Christmas Show
7 Movie
50 Merv Griffin
9:00 2 Medical Center
9 News-Don West
56 Eye to Eye
9:30 9 Messe Pour Le Temps Present
56 The First Detroiter's
10:00 2 Cannon
4 Cole Porter in Paris
7 Owen Marshall
50 Perry Mason
56 Soul!
11:00 2 4 7 News
9 CBC News
50 One Step Beyond
11:20 9 News
11:30 2 Movie
"Torpedo Run" (1958)
4 Johnny Carson
7 Movie
"Frankenstein"
50 Movie
"Montana" (1950)
12:00 9 Movie
"King Rat"
1:00 4 7 News
1:30 2 Movie
"Unfaithfully Yours" (1948
3:00 2 News
Have a flair for
artistic writing?
If you are interest-
ed in reviewing
poetry, and music.
or writing feature
Editor, c/o The
drama. dance, film,
Michigan Daily.
THURS. JAWUARY 18
FREE INSTRUCTION
UNIION '7-9 P M

odic tussles against indecent ex-
posure.
Reverend Scott (Gene Hack-
man) is a brash member of the
clergy's new breed and a hybrid
of Brigham Young, Jesus Popeye
Doyle. Acting, on his part, con-
sisted mainly of yelling louder
than Ernest Borgnine, who was
yelling louder than Stella Stev-
ens. Laughable, yet memorable
were the religious allusions in
the Stirling Silliphant and Wen-
dell Mayes screenplay. Rev.
Scott delivers a Sermon on the
Mount to those disbelieving pas-
sengers who will not follow him
to engine room above. They, of
course, perish as do all not will-
ing to be guided by the saviour.
A note of truth to the ridiculous
events is that people tend to fol-
low those who yell loudest, in
this case the Reverend. Between

Poseidon sinks into
sea of banality

the regular crises, Hackman in-
stills faith and unity with an
occasional pep talk, eulogy or
sermonette.
Poseidon Adventure wallows
amidst unimaginative special ef-
fects. The dead people in the
film have an eery resemblance
to the live actors, which does-
n't say much for either; shock-
ing death is denoted by eyes
open while peaceful eternity al-
lows the eyes to fall closed. The
ship itself is all of eight feet
long and is tossed by the storm-
ing seas of an obvious Hollywood
water tank. The interior of the
vessel, upside down during the
majority of the picture, is one
redeeming feature and for the
most believable.
The best that can be said for
The Poseidon Adventure is that
it is equal to decent television
fare . . . and that is exactly what
the film reminds one of consider-
ing the pasteboard sets, acting,
and meaning. Do not offend, do
not excite and at the same time
do not entertain an audience that
is waiting for what the publicity
department boasts as "power-
packed" film fare.

UAC-DAYSTAR PRESENTS WITH WNRZ
David Bromnlberg

IN CONCERT,

also, Terry

Tate

"The most exciting talent to emerge
loge since Dylan."
"An eclectic, rowdy, slightly lunatic

from the Vil-
-Rolling Stone
genius.
-Michigan Doily

4IF PMost of our patrons agree with
Free Press critic Susan Stark who
caled HAROLD AND MAUDE
C A P Sthe most easy-to-take comedy of
the year" and who picked it as
Theatr e _ _ _ne _ _-4416 one of the year's
10 best films.
They met at the funeral of a perfect stranger.
From then on, things got perfectly stranger and stranger.
Paramount Pictures Presents
HAROLD and MAUDE
Color by Technicolor* A Paramount Picture ""'..
GP t$ ,, EXTRA
"THE DOVE"
A satire on ingmar Bergman films.

El

Irene Connors and Walter Atanamah in the roles of Queen Elaanor
and King Henry in scene from Ann Arbor Civic Theatre's product-
ion of The Lion in Winter which opens tonight in Mendelssohn.
FILM-The AA Film Coop shows Palmer's 200 Motels tonight
in Aud. A, Angell at 7 and 9. Cinema Guild presents
Pasolini's The Gospel According to St. Matthew tonight
at 7 and 9:20 in the Arch. Aud. The Psych. 171 Film
series shows Zuckercandl and Invention of the Adolescent
this afternoon at 4 in the UGLI Multi-purpose Rm. New
Morning Films presents Le Bbnheur and a Bessie Smith
short tonight in the MLB.
MUSIC-The Bartok String Quartet performs at 8:30 tonight
in Rackham Aud. The Interlochen Arts Academy Clarinet
Choir, Fred Ormand, conductor, performs at 8 tonight
in the U-M School of Music Recital Hall.
DRAMA-The Ann Arbor Civic Theatre presents The Lion in
the Winter tonight in Mendellsohn Theatre at 8.
ART-The Ann Arbor Art Assoc. opens a new show today of
watercolors by well known local painters at City Half.
Hours from 8 to 5.
SIGN UP NOW!
MUSIC LESSONS,
ANN ARBOR MUSIC MART will soon
be starting Class Lessons in Guitar,
Flute, Banjo, & Drums.
$12.00 for 6 weekly lessons
RENTAL INSTRUMENTS AVAILABLE!
Rent is applied toward purchase
of the instrument
CONTACT BILL ROBBINS

Wed., Jan. 24, Power Center, $2.50
TICKETS:
MICHIGAN UNION SALVATION RECORDS
11-5:30, Mon.-Sat. 10-7 p.m. Mon.-Sat.
ONLY 1400 SEATS IN POWER CENTER!
also on sale now: FREDDIE KING
LUTHER ALLISON, MOJO BOOGIE, this
SATURDAY NITE-HILL AUD. $4-3.50-3.0O

HELL,
UPSIDE
DOWN

TWO FILMS BY KEN RUSSELL, DIRECTOR OF "WOMEN IN LOVE" AND "THE DEVILS"

"Best Movie Musical of 1971!"
-N EWSDAY
"ONE OF THE
YEAR'S BEST!"
-National Board of Review,f
-Newsweek, -L.A. Times,
-Assoc. Press, -Cue,
-L.A. Herald-Examiner,
-Newsday, -Group W Radio
"BEST DIRECTOR
OF THE YEAR-
KEN RUSSELL"
-National Board of Review
"Contains enough
for 20 ordinary
musicals. Twiggyi.o
succeeds beyond
all expectations.
You'll say[M$
'Busby Berkeley'!" *®'GM
-Roaer Greensoun, N.Y. Times

RUSSELL'S LATEST FIL
"OUTRAGEOUSLY
REFRESHING,
DIFFERENT AND
ENJOYABLE."
-William Wolf, Cue
"Ken Russell succeeds
in communicating
the white-hot
energies of the
creative act in its
most desperate
and inspired form."
-Zimmerman, Newsweek
"Another brilliant
exercise by one of
the more talented
film stylists of
today."

Ken RussetI Film
lava gO

Who will
survive-in one
one of the
greatest escape
adventures evert
DAN uyl"MDRBYljK ]

ANN ARBOR MUSiC MART
336 S. STATE

]69-4980
Mon.-Sat. 9:30-9:00

F

THE MOTHERS OF INVENTION, RINGO STARR, & THEODORE BIKEL in
200 OTELS
Devised by FRANK ZAPPA. Directed by TONY PALMER
"Touring with a rock band can ma ke you crazy."-So can this movie!
A surreal diary, done on high-resolution videotape originally, with rock music that
uses fantasies mixed with realities, loads of quick cuts and a lot of psychedelic
colors.
TONIGHT-JAN. 17th-ONLY 35mm COLOR-7 & 9 P.M.
,3..-. TA ..-In O-L -TMn vDJrIJ rFC NE-J

---Variety

1 1 _ M, M AV

m

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