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April 07, 1973 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-04-07

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, Pag' Eight .-

THEWICN1GAN DAILY

Saturday, April 7, 1973

~Page EIgH THE~MICHIGAN DAILY Saturday, April 7, 1973

FAILS BAM DEMANDS:

'U' misses black
enrollment objective

(Continued from Page 1)
now has to compete with such
schools as Wayne State Univer-
sity, Michigan State University,
and Eastern Michigan University
for minority students.
A major factor governing the
success of the program is finan-
cial aid, and at this point there
are a number of unanswered
questions about the program's
funding for the next year.
Many of these questions will be
answered in Washington where
Congress has yet to act on Presi-
dent Nixon's budget cuts includ-
ing a $4 million slash in student
aid remarked for the University.
On the state level, Gov. William
Milliken has recommended an
increase of only $500,000 over last
year's allotment. This figure may
not be enough to cover the 'oss

in federal funds which outgoing
Opportunity Program Director
John Romani estimates at about
$1.1 million.
"As soon as we know the mag-
nitude of the gaps created by the,
federal cuts, we will begin look-
ing for additional funds from
within the University," Romani
adds.
Presently $3.4 million in aid is
budgeted for the program, plus
an additional $1.6 million in gift
aid promised by the Regents at
their February meeting.
"This takes us a good way
down the road as far as the Op-
portunity Program goes, but does
not help students meet other fi-
nancial needs brought about by
the higher cost of living," ex-
plains Romani.

Local boycott effect moderate
continued from Page 1) to nothing," a Sgt. Pepper's spokes- sfpply for next week."
to have crippled boycott effective- man said. Most of these stores University Business Administra-
ness outside the campus, however. sell little fresh meat, however, of- tion Prof. Pail McCracken, a for-
Representatives of chain stores in- fering mainly packaged luncheon mer Nixon economic advisor, inter.
cluding A&P, Wrigley's Food Mart meats and bacon. preted the boycott as more sym-
and Meijer's Thrifty Acres said East Quad's Halfway Inn, the bolic than efficacious. McCracken
yesterday their meat sales were only local restaurant that has ac- said a week-long boycott offers "no
not substantially affected by the tively supported the meat boy- reason to think that market pat-
boycott in the city, although state- cott, reports meat sales in their terns will have been displaced."
wide sales fell sharply Monday snackbar operation are down "99 "But there's a lesson here," he
through Wednesday. per cent." commented. "If people eat less
A management source at A&P's The restaurant posted signs ask- meat that is one way to lower
Store 35 on Huron Ave. said meat ing customers not to buy meat, prices."
boycotters "didn't have the power citing, a rise in their meat costs McCracken blamed high meat
of their convictions." "The first of 17 per cent between November prices on general economic trends.
three days it was easy to go with- and March and an additional 23 "Farm output last year was rough-
out meat, then they got hungry," per cent increase in March. ly unchanged, whereas employment
he claimed. Meanwhile two local health food and incomes increased very sharp-
A spokesman at A&P's state of- stores, Eden Organic Foods and ly," he said, explaining that in
fice in Detroit reported, "The early Soybean Cellars restaurant,' said creased demand for meat "express-
part of the week we were affected their sales have increased, but ed itself in higher prices." Mc-
strongly, but word has gotten they hesitated to link the new Cracken claimed President Nixon's
around that there might be a meat business to the meat boycott. removal of meat import quotas
shortage. There's no sign of a boy- Sources disagreed as to what will will have little effect because "the
cott now." happen next week when the official domestic market is just so huge."
"We had already noted last week boycott is lifted. Demand for meat He said over time meat supply
that our customers were leaning in the city is expected to rise to might increase, however, as farm-
toward fish, eggs and poultry normal or above normal levels, but ers adjust breeding levels to meet
rather than red meat," a Wrigley's some stores claimed the sudden higher demand.
spokesman said. "The boycott has demand coupled with effects of

A

4
A

41

1.

Council OKs tenant book.
(Continued from Page 1) landlords will be required to dis-
tenant s recourse if evicted il- tribute the booklet to all tenants
legally. when they sign a lease. As yet no
Council passed the resolution vir- booklets have been printed by the
tually without debate. The Demo- city. The revenue sharing budget
cratic and Human Rights Party passed last week however includes
councilmembers plus Bruce Benner a $5,000 appropriation to defray
(R-Fourth Ward) cast the affirma- printing and distribution costs.
tive votes. "This booklet is vitally impor-
Benner indicated he voted in ztan since tenants cannot exercise
favor of the measure only because:th ts i te a re na wre sf
he believes the Republican dom- their rights if they are unaware of
inated council, which assumes con- them," Rose said. But he admitted
troe next Monday, will reconsider the booklet was a compromise- in
tro nset Modseveral respects.
the issue.
After the meeting, Jerry De- A number of points have not been
Grieck (HRP-Second Ward) said made particularly clear in the
if the Republican controlled coun- booklet's actual text," he explain-
cil reconsiders the tenant's rights ed. Whenever tenants have ques-
booklet, they will probably repeal tions about their legal rights they
it. should consult a lawyer, especially
Under the terms of the resolution before signing a lease, Rose added.
Meat boycott hods on

Daily Photo by TOM GOTTLIEB
Former Unive'rsity student Doug Miller breaks into a big, cold grin yesterday as he devours the fruits
of spring: The ice cream man is here.
POSSIBLE BREAKTHROUGH:
'U1 doctor investigates cancer.

had some effect,, especially at the
beginning of the week, but not of
a substantial nature. The customers
are coming back to the meat coun-
ters and we expect sales to be
normal over the weekend," he
claimed.

i
i
$!l

national sale reductons tis weeI
could mean a shortage.
"Prices will be pretty much the.
same but I don't know if there'll be
any meat to sell," an A&P repre-
sentative said yesterday. "We may
be putting potato chips in the meatG
counter."
But a Wrigley's spokesman coun-
tered, "At this point we don't have
any problems with available meat

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(Continued from Page 1)

the Mouse House itself.

is. In the same period of time, j Foster has worked primarily with
Foster's treated mice show lumps one strain of mice and one kind of
barely larger than a pinhead. Many tumor. Several of his students are
show no sign at all, except for a working on different strains and
harmless black deposit of melanin, tumors, in the hope that the sys-
visible beneath the white fur of the tem can eventually be applied in
mouse. Foster refers to this as a more general way, possibly even
"garbage" left behind by the re- to other species.

treating tumor.
Foster often calls his mice "little
black boxes" because, he says,
"We don't know exactly what's
going on inside. You push a button,
and out comes a message, but you,
never know what it's going to be
beforehand."
At least in this case, he can be
fairly sure. In his original study,
95 per cent of the treated' mice
were completely cured, and the re-
maining five per cent showed sig-
nificantly slower tumor growth than'
the untreated controls.
"This is a very high frequency
of anti-tumor protection,"' Foster

(Continued from Page 1)
up and down erratically, confus-
ing farmers who aren't sure what
prices their livestock will bring.
Because Friday is a light trad-
ing day on livestock markets, there
were not enough cattle shipments
to establishna price trend for beef-
on-the-hoof.
The boycott took an increasing
toll of meat industry layoffs and
packingplant shutdowns. More than
20,000 packing plant workers had
been laid off.
'Five-hundred employes were
thrown out of work when the Na-
tional Beef Packing Co. plant at
Liberal, Kan., closed. Farmland
Co-op at Garden City, Kan., laid
off 73 workers "because of the
price situation."
Supermarkets across the nation
may face a meat shortage next
week because so many packing
houses have shut down. "Pork
looks good," one packing industry
spokesman said, "but we just don't
know about beef."
Meat counters have been notice-
ably empty this week. Foreseeing

.
.j

the possibility of a shortage,
owners are keeping what

store
meat

they nave in freezers. says, "including animals who,
Consumer activists said they once treated, can reject a second
were pleased with the results of and even a third potentially lethal
the boycott. dose."
Sharon Harris, chairman of the Even untreated mice normally
Albany, N.Y., branch of FIT- have an immune response to a tu-
Fight Inflation Together-said she mor challenge, Foster says, but it
jfavors extending the boycott ust isn't strong enough. He pic-
througsteendngfthAprtunlesst tures the response as a "race"
phrces arhcut by 20 or2priler ess.between dividing tumor cells and
"We would be satisfied f the , dividing cells of the host immune
" system.
roll back to the level prior to "What we think we're doing is
January. That's when prices really stimulating the host to provide
started rising," Harris said. stmlin th hatoprvd
more cell 'recruits' that can be
Following the lead of several mobilized for antitumor attack,"
other restaurants around the na- Foster explains.
tion, a chain of pancake houses in In other words, the treatment
St. Louis announced a ban on gives the mouse a head start in
meat from 6 a.m. to midnight the race against cancer.
Friday. The manager of one outlet Director of the Mammalian Gene-
said he normally serves 1,600 tics Center ("Mouse House" to
pounds of meat on Friday. "But those in the know), Foster main-
we won't serve meat at all," he tains between eight and ten trou-
. " h esand mice. The Mouse House oc-
soaid"ithe hopsewvescansoe-rcasionally provides mice for gene-
how aid the housewives in their tics classes, Foster says, but most
fight against meat prices." of them are used for research in

"Dr. Foster got me so excited
about his work that I just had to
do some work here to see if what
he said was really true," com-
ments Barbara Michalak, a grad-
uate student working at the Mouse
G House. "You get to the point where
you really believe in this, you
really believe something important
can be done with it. It's practical
science."
The real motivation behind Fos-
ter's project, like all cancer re-
search, is the hope that someday
it can be applied to humans. But
Foster stresses that there is a
great difference between mice and
men, and that a- tremendous
amount of work needs to be done
to determine if this approach is
valid for humans.
"The real question," he says,
"involves the use of humans in
experimentation. There are very
serious constraints on research on
humans."
One of Foster's students is pres-
entlyeattempting to isolate a frac-
tion of the liver cell which is re-
sponsible for the success of the
treatment.,.
"We want to work in the direction
of a more chemically defined stim-
ulus of the immune response di-
rected toward anti-tumor activity,"
Foster concludes. "There would
be minimal danger in using such a

I stimulant." Meijer's sales took the most dras-'
Ideally, Foster pictures a system tic dive, falling 25 per cent state-
where a patient could be immuno- wide according to a Grand Rapids
logically challenged immediately spokesman.'
after cancer surgery. The patient's Campus stores like the S. Uni-
immune system, instead of risky versity- Food Mart, Sgt. Pepper's
radiation therapy, could be the General Store, the Village Corner
"watchdog," he adds, specifically and Campus Corners have experi-
tracking down wandering cancer enced sharp drops in meat sales,
cells invisible to the surgeon. representatives said. "We're down
FBI relocation pooe
(Continued from Page 1) to Senate approval-for seven-year
Ronald Ziegler said Nixon "is now terms which could be extended if
in the process of finding a man the Senate votes re-confirmation.
to nominate to head up the FBI. Meanwhile Gray, widely regard-
I don't 'know when he will make ed as a victim of the Watergtte
that decision." affair because of his admission
The President accepted Gray's ! that he furnished raw FBI files on
request Thursday night that his the bugging incident to White
name be withdrawn. Nixon said it House counsel John Dean III, went
was obvious Gray didn't have the : into hidding yesterday.
votes for confirmation. The FBI said he was out of
Key senators said - yesterday no Washington.

overtures have been made to them
about an acceptable choice for
FBI director now that Gray's nom-
ination has been wjthdrawn.
Among the names mentioned in
speculation as the next nominee
were Henry Petersen, head of the
Justice Department's criminal di-
vision who handled the govern-
ment's Watergate investigation;
Myles Ambrose, the administra-
tion's drug law enforcement chief,
and U.S. District Judge William
Byrne Jr., who is presiding at the
Pentagon Papers trial in Los An-
geles.
Byrd's bill would make the FBI
an independent agency, wit) the
director and assistant director
chosen by the President-subject

MONDAY, APRIL 9
Dr. Charles -L. S tevenson
Professor, Department of Philosophy
SPEAKS ON
"Man and His a us
WHAT VALUE JUDGMENTS ARE AND HOW WE
CAN USE SCIENCE TO SUPPORT THEM
6th Lecture of a Series entitled
AMAN AND HIS WAYS
7:30-9:00 P.M.
International Center Recreation Room
603 E. MADISON
Informal discussion follows lecture.
REFRESHMENTS WILL BE SERVED
,, The University of Michigan
MI!DInternational Center

.4

-TONIGH T-
a frontier of psychiatry
R. D. Laing's
ASYLUM
unique color documentary of
Laing's therapeutic commune in
London.
"This is the only film that
shows how we work to help
people who feel that society is
trying to destroy them."
7:15 & 9:30 $1.25 cont.
Friends of Newsreel MLB 3

FLAMENCO FREAKS
Internationally known Flamenco guitarist Juan
Serrano will be taking' appointments for private
instruction this week. Call:
Ann Arbor Music Mart

d

ISRAEL

NOW

CC/tw'c/ 14Jhft en'ice4

and 25th

Anniversary

Celebration

9:30-9:00 MON.-SAT.

769-4980

336 S. State St.

UNIVERSITY REFORMED
CHURCH

CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenaw

'FIRST UNITED METHODIST

1001 E. Huron Servic
9:30 a.m.-Discussion Classes. 6:00 p.r
10:30 a.m. - Children's Sunday; Pastor:
"Moms, Dads, and Kids." Calvin 10:00
Malefyt, preacher. 11:00
5:30 p.m.-Student Supper, 75c. Acquain
6:30 p.m.-"The Citizen and Big 6:00 p
Brother," Dr. Paul Kauper, U of Every
M Law School, speaker.
BETHL
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN OF C
CHURCH (ALC, LCA) (formerly 423 S. F
Lutheran Student Chapel) Minister
801 S. Forest (Corner of Hill St.) Simon
Donald G. Zill, Pastor Associat
Sunday Folk Mass-10:30 a.m. Broph
Sunday School-9:15 a.m. 9 a.m
Sunday Supper-6:15 p.m. 10 a.n
Program-7:00 p.m. Church
Wednesday Eucharist-5:15 p.m.
SAMARIA LUTHERAN, LCA ST. AN
272 Hewitt Rd., Ypsilanti CHUR
Rev. Dean Tyson, -Pastor 8:00 a
Family Worship and Nursery at 10:00
11:00 a.m. Faculty and Students Sermon,
welcome,
* * IRST
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN On the
CHAPEL (LCMS) State an
1511 Washtenaw Avenue Rev. Te
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor Rev. Ro
Sunday at 9:15 and 10:30 a.m-
Worship Services PACKAI
Sunday at,.9:15 a.m.-Bible Study. 2580 Pa
Wednesday at 10 p.m.-Midweek Tom Bli
Sunda
HURON HILLS BAPTIST Worsh
CHURCH: 3150 Glacier Way Traini
Pastor: Charles Johnson
For information, transportation, 'f<"".
personalized help, etc., phone 769-
6299 or 761-6749.s

ces-Sunday, 10:00 a.m. and
M.
Rev. Donald Postema
a.m.-Morning Worship.
a.m. - Coffee and Get-
rted Time.
o.m.-Evening Worship.
one Welcome.
* * *
EHEM UNITED CHURCH
HRIST
Fourth Ave. Ph. 665-6149
rs: T. L. Trost, Jr.; R. E.
son.
te Ministers: Dennis R.
y and Howard F. Gebhart.
.: Morning Prayer.
m.: Worship Service and1
School.
* *
DREWS EPISCOPAL
CH, 306 N. Division.
a.m.: Holy Eucharist.
a.m.: Holy Eucharist and
* * *
CONGREGATIONAL
Campus at the corner of
nd William Sts.
rry N. Smith, Sr. Minister
nald C. Phillips, Assistant
4 * *
RD ROAD BAPTIST
ckard Road, 971-0773
oxam, Pastor, 971-3152
y School, 9:45 a.m.
ip: 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.
ng Hour: 6 pmm.

CHURCH and WESLEY FOUNDA
TION - State at Huron and Wash.
9:30 and 11:00 a.m. -Worship
Services-Sermon by Dr. Donald
B. Strobe: "Is the Golden Rule
Enough?" Series: Sermon on the
Mount.
Broadcast on WNRS 1290 AM,
WNRZ 103 FM, 11:00 a.m.-noon.
Next Sunday: Palm Sunday, Spe-
cial Choir Program both Ser-ices.
WESLEY FOUNDATION
Sunday, April 8:
5:30 p.m. - Celebration, Wesley
Lounge.
6:15 p.m.-Supper, Pine room.
7:00 p.m. - Program, Wesley
Lounge. Slides and film on China
with Charles Cell.
Thursday, April 12:
6:00 p.m. - Grad Community.
Dinner and program.
Friday, April 13:
6:15 p.m.-Young Marrieds. Din-
ner and program, Wesley Lounge.
FIRST- PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Avenue
Services of Worship at 9:00 and
10:30 a.m.-Sermon: "God, the Ap-
proachable." Preaching: Robert E.
Sanders.
COLLEGE PROGRAM
Bible Study-Tuesdays 12:00 to
1:00.
Holy Communion - Wednesdays
5:15 to 5:45.
Supper Program - Wednesdays'
6:00.

M. E. C. H. A. presents
EL TEATRO CAMPESINO
de AZTLAN
"THE CHICANO FARMWORKER THEATER"
The Chicano Struggle
UTFWUnion and Boycott Efforts
MUSIC-PLAYS--SATIRE-SPIRIT
Sat., April 14-Hill Auditorium
U of M Campus-8 P.M.
NO ADMISSION
SOPH SHOW
.NEEDS FRESHMEN FOR
CENTRAL COMMITTEE-includes

students.

. j

THURSDAY, APRIL 12-free ad mission
MICHIGAN UNION BALLROOM
BEGINNING at 7:30-Information on programs in Israel for American

-university programs, sherut la'am, kibbutz ulpan,
aliyah, archaeological digs, tours, art and dance
BEGINNING at 8:30--The Parvarium Israeli folksingers

t

Director

Assistant Director
Assistant Producer
Choreographer
Musical Director
Stage Manager
Tickets and Ushers
Secretary
Technical Director

Scene Designer
Costume Designer
Public Relations
(Publicity)
Business Manager
Make-Up Chairperson
Program Head
Artists
Prop Head

4,

WEST BANK BEEF AND BARREL PR'ESENTS A

J

SundayBrunch
A BOUNT IFUL BOARD OF EXCITING DISHES
A I4 D 'lrwi!f/Y0-&M T. t, Ith//A 1i' A- . ft lM"!

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