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April 07, 1973 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-04-07

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Poge Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, April 7, 1973

PageTwoTHE ICHGAN AIL

Saturday, April 7, 1973

Sen. Irooke denied
Hanoi visa request

NEW WORLD FILM CO-OP
Nine men who came too late and staved too long.

VIENTIANE, Laos (P)- - Sen.
Edward Brooke (R-Mass.), long
an opponent of the war in In-
dochina, was rebuffed yesterday
in his attempt to visit Hanoi to
discuss its need for rehabilita-
tion.
The North Vietnamese embassy
advised Brooks that Hanoi of-
ficials welcomed his initiative
but were very busy and had no
time for him in the next few
weeks. He had been waiting here
for a visa, and had hoped to fly
to Hanoi today. Reporters plan-
ned to accompany him.
For several years the Massa-
chusetts .senator spoke out
against the war and sponsored
various amendment to cut off
funds and call an end to the
fighting.
When he pressed for word yes-
terday on when he might be
able to have talks in Hanoi the
embassy replied: "Perhaps in a
couple of months."
Brooke is on a fact-finding
tour of Indochina preparing for
Senate consideration of any pos-
sible requests for approval of
aid to the area.
He told newsmen he was disap-
pointed but had not given up the
principles of nondiscriminatory
aid for all Indochina.
"I am not bitter," he said.
"But there were many questions
I wanted to explore, such as their
needs for food, what they intend
to do to bring about an end to
hostilities in Indochina gener-
ally, whether they would accept
United Nations assistance, the
machinery for distribution of
aid, and whether it would be
multilateral or bilateral."

Brooke commented that Viet-
nam aid "is just not popular and
aid to North Vietnam is less pop-
ular." It would be very difficult
he added, for Congress to pass
any substantial aid to Hanoi un-
til his questions are answered.
This week the U. S. Senate
voted 88-3 to bar reconstruction
aid to Hanoi unless Congress
gives specific prior approval.
Brooke said he hoped Hanoi's
rejection of his visit did not
mean that the communications
which had opened between the
two countries had now closed.
The senator met for almost

TODAY AT 1-3-5-7-9
"Borbra Streisand is a com-
plete reason for goinq to the
movies, as Garbo was."
-Pauline Koel, New Yorker

BARBRSTREIMDj

WEDNESDAY

Modern Languages Bldg.
Aud. 111
7:30 & 9:45 P.M.

AP Photo
Latter-day Lancelot
A 20th Century knight loses his horse during a match hosted by the Canadian Jousting Association.
Over 50 authentically garbed knights, ladies, wenches and lackeys make up the Association's court.
WOUNDED .KNEE:
Indian takeover to end toda
if got.talhs prove sincere

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4

l~rL$Med jatrics
MONDO CANE
"There is more of a strange and grotesque nature-more that is weird,
paradoxical, bizarre and reflective of the range of man's behavior-in this
extraordinary candid factual film than could come within an average
man's experience or-be likely to be seen often on the screen . . . a sort
of cinematic compilation of Believe-It-Or-Note vignettes."
-NEW YORK TIMES
"Fast pace; sophisticated commentary and occasional hilarity."
-TIME
7 & 9:30 P.M.
SATURDAY, April 7
NAT. SCL. AUD.
ONLY 75c TICKETS ON SALE AT 6 P.M.

A

I

WASHINGTON ( P) - Indian Knee until "they (federal officials)
leader Russell Means warned yes- prove to us that they are negotiat-
terday that the conflict at Wound- ing in good faith."
ed Knee did not necessarily end Means, free under $25,000 bond
with the signing of a peace treaty. sice he was charged Thursday
"The federal government has for his role in the takeover, is
duped the press and the world scheduled to meet today with Leo-
again," Means told newsmen as nard Garment, special consultant
he arrived at Dulles International to President Nixon.
Airport for weekend meetings with They are to discuss a p
White House representatives. "The tial treaty commission to examine
conflict at Wounded Knee is not U.S.-Indian treaties.
over and will not be over until the
federal government shows it is The treaty commission is one of,
sincere." ri six points covered in the agree-I
Under provisions of a peace ment signed Thursday by Means,'
agreement that ended a 37-day other members of the American
siege of Wounded Knee, the In- Indian Movement and Asst. U. S.
dians who held the village in South Atty. Gen. Kent Frizzell.
Dakota are scheduled to lay down! Means said the Indians also will'
their arms and leave today. try to arrange a meeting with John:
Means said, however, that no arms Ehrlichman, the President's do-
will be surrendered at Wounded mestic adviser.
Rains swell waters
along the Mississippi
By AP and UPI
A storm system carried more rains into soggy regions of the lower
Mississippi Valley yesterday, aggravating flood conditions from Ar-
kansas to Louisiana.
"We're still sitting on a powder keg," said a spokesman for the
National Weather Service at St. Louis, where conditions improved
during the day. "If we could get a week of no rain, we'd be in good
shape."
Up and down the river and across the breadth of its intricate sys-
tem of tributaries, Officials estimated that more than seven million
acres were under water. Some of that was valuable farm land.
Boats and National Guard trucks were used to evacuate families
from their homes. Thousands of emergency workers patrolled levees
and helped with rescue activities along the swollen river from St.
Louis south.
The river, nearing its highest stage in 30 years, was at 49.5 feet
at Vicksburg and expected to crest at 50 feet Sunday. This was a
slight increase over the previous crest forecast of 49.7 feet.
The major threat to Mississippians, however, was caused by back-
water from other rain-swollen streams such as the Yazoo and Sun-
flower Rivers which will not be able to flow into the Mississippi.
Six persons have died in the floods - five of them in Illinois and
Missouri and the sixth in a tugboat accident in the lower Mississippi,
where four persons are still reported missing. The waters have driven
more than 4,000 families from their homes in an area from central
Missouri to the southern tip of Illinois.

The Wounded Knee agreement
also calls for Indian militants to
leave the village and submit to
arrest after receiving word that
the Washington meeting was un-
derway. Means said the telephone
call to disarm may be made when
the meeting begins at 9 a.m.
EST - but added that it may not
be made for several Saturdays.
A meeting is to be held in Wash-
ington next month between Indian
leaders and White House repre-
sentatives to discuss Indian af-
fairs further.
More than 300 permanent Wound-
ed Knee area residents were dis-
placed by the occupation of the
historic village. They are sched-
uled to begin returning home to-
day if the occupation is ended.

I

The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0562. Second
class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan. 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
'carrier (campus area); ,$11 local mail
(in Mich. or Ohio); $13 non-local mail
(other states and foreign).
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates,; $5.50 by carrier (campus
area); $6.50 local mail (in Mich. or
Ohio); $7.50 non-local mail (othei
states and foreign).

Sen. Brooke
two hours with the Pathet Lao's
permanent representative here
South Phetrasy, who gave hima
request for aid and a promise o
cooperation in tracing any Amer
icans missing in action or dead
in Communist-held areas.
South has said there are no
more U. S. prisoners in Laos
Brooke asked him to bring up the
question of the dead and missing
in the Pathet Lao Central Com
mittee.
Brooke is scheduled to visi
Saigon on Monday or Tuesday
after a brief stop in Bangkok.

s
e,
a

MUSKET '73
WEST SIDE
April 5, 8:00 p.m.
April 6, 8:00p.m.

STORY

S

April 7, 2:00 p.m. and 8:00 p.m.
April 8, 3:00 p.m.
Good Seats Available for All Performances
TICKETS AVAILABLE in the
POWER CENTER BOX OFFICE
Mon., Wed., Fri. - 1:30 -5:00
Tues., Thurs. - 10:00 - 2:00

f
-
d
t
e
g
It
y
STONIGHT- APRIL : 7
A SPECIAL SHOWING
of KENJI MIZOGUCHI'S
(TALES OF THE SILVERY MOONLIGHT AFTER THE RAIN)
Like his Japanese contemporary Ozu, Kenji Mizoguchi was a
relatively late discovery of United States film audiences. Now,
since several of his films have been made available in this coun-
try, he has been recognized as a master of the cinematic arts
and Ugetsu stands as one of his finest achievements.
UGETSU: A Distinguished Film by a Unique Artist
"Ugetsu" is a story of ancient
Japan - the late sixteenth
century - when the country ~
was overrun by feudal war
lords and life was cheap. Its
two heroes, a pottery maker
and a peasant farmer, hope
to profit from the incessant s,;.;v;::;;;,: ( :"> ka, .
! warfare, the potter by selling
o J
his wares in the cities at in-
flated prices, the farmer by .*.-.**.*a,
joining a lord's army and
making himself rich on the
spoils. As events w'ork outak,
each gets his wish, then finds
that the rewards are far less
than the cost in terms of
human suffering and naked
terror Violence-the raw vio-
lence of rape and plunder
and murder-impinges upon
every scene in the film.
What makes "Ugetsu" a corn- 1-S
which up to this point has
been utterly realistic - the point, no waking up to find finally he returns home he
potter is approached by two that it was all a dream. In- finds his dead wife waiting
wealthy ladies and invited to stead, reality and unreality for him. Silently she prepares
show his wares at their home continue to interpenetrate his meal, washes his wounds,
It soon develops that the through to the end. The pot- and puts him to bed-then
younger woman is far more ter is discovered with a sacred vanishes w t h the morning
interested in the man himself sword from the home of his light Is It a dream? Is It
than in his pottery, He be- mistress, w h i c h the local fantasy? Or is it a story, told
comes her lover, Only to dis- authorities i a e n t i f y as a as a story, that we are asked
cover that she is in fact a stolen temple trophy. The to believe in, to accept?
ghost. There is no easy tran- man is beaten and all his -Arthur Knight.
sition back to reality at this money taken away. When Saturday Review
I !

Yh

f

LED ZEPPLIN
BUDDY MILES
STEHEN STILLS

-

,I . t-- - -

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~J~T

WOMEN'S
COMMUNITY
%ypSCHU

ERIC CLAPTON
JACK BRUCE
AND
-MODERN JAZZ
QUINTET
"SUPER SHOW
Directed by John Crone
SUPER SHOW has the largest number of superstars performing
together than any other concert. The show has everything from
rock to jazz to blues and is sure to appeal to almost ,everyone.
Led Zepplin performs "Dazed" and "Confused" and allows you
to see some of Jimmy Page's guitar virtuoso. Stephen Stills joins
with Buddy Miles group to perform "Black Queen," one of Stills'
comnositions nrohnhlv never henrd befor.n There is nls nne of

WORKSHOP 1:10 A.M.-12 NOON
I. Center for Continuing Eduication for Women,
University of Michigan. "Future Think-
Choices for Women"
2. Three workshops on modern dance after
panel on "Psychology of Modern Dance"
Rise Friedman-"Sensitivity and Body
Awareness"
African Dance"
Greg Miller and Debbie Ross, "Movement"
3, Women's Crisis Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
"Women and Rape"
4. Marsha Federbush, author, Let Them Aspire;
study of sex discrimination in public schools
books, films, policies.
5. Rainbow Sisters, Rainbow People's Party,
Ann Arbor. Women in a Politicized
Commune-Role and Participation
Lunch
WORKSHOP 11: I P.M.-3 P.M.
1. Kate Emerson of National Welfare Rights
Organization, Michigan. "The National
Welfare Rights Movement: :Day Care
and OEO"
2. Kay weiss and Belita Cowan (Ms. Weiss is
responsible for informing Ralph Nader about
dangers of the morning-after pill DES),

WORKSHOP 111: 3 P.M.-5 P.M.
1. Professor Nan Pendrell, Department of
Anthropology, viisting professor from New
York, "Women and Prisons"
2. Chicana and Latin American Women of Ann
Arbor and Detroit and MECHA.
"Latinas: women of Latin America"
3. Young people of Youth Liberation of Ann
Arbor (they publish a magazine, FPS, which
has a wide subscription all over the U.S.,
England and Australia, and are a group of
high school people struggling for full civil
and human rights). "Youth Liberation:
Young People Are People Too"
4. Gay Awareness Women's Kollective:
Human Liberation"
Dinner
WORKSHOP IV: 7 P.M.-9 P.M.:
St. Andrew's Church
1. Professor Gary Bron, Department of
Psychology, University of Michigan, plus
members of FOCUS of the Psychology
Department will conduct a discussion of
the "Psychology of Men and Women:
Communication-Understandimg"

11

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