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April 04, 1973 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-04-04

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t Wednesday, April 4, 1973
1

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Wednesday, April 4, 1973 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

tonight
6:00 2 4 7 News
9 Courtship of Eddie's Father
50 Flintstones
56 Operation Second Chance
6:30 2 CBS News
4 NBC News
7 ABC News
9 I Dream of Jeannie
50 Gilligan's Island
56 German Program
6:45 56 We Want To Help
7:00 2 Truth or Consequences
4 News
7 To Tell The Truth
9 Beverly Hillbillies
50 I Love Lucy
56 Consumer Game
7:30 2 What's My Line?
4 Festival of Family Classics
7 Wild Kingdom
9 News
50 Hogan's Heroes
8:00 2 Sonny and Cher Comedy Hour
4 Winnie the Pooh and the
Honey Tree
7 Movie
"The Farmer's Daugher"
(1947)
9 Stanley Cup Playoffs
50 Dragnet
56 America '73
8:30 4 Elvis: Aloha from Hawaii
50 Merv Griffin
9:00 2 Medical Center
20 Peyton Place
50 Lenox Quartet-Haydn
Opus 20
9:30 20 Seven Hundred Club
56 Naturalists
10:00 2 Cannon
4 Johnny Carson
7 Jack Paar Tonite
20 Camp Meeting Hour

50 Movie
He Was Her Man (1934)
12:00 9 Movie
"The Bohemian Girl." (1936)
1:00 4 7 News
1:30 2 Movie
"My Girl Tisa." (1948)
9 Movie
"Our Relations" (1936)
3:00 2 TV High School
3:30 2 News
wcbn
89.5 fm

Bette: Artiste supreme

9:00
12:00
4:00
7:00
8:00
11:00
3:00

The Morning After
Progressive Rock
Folk
Talk Back
Rhythm and Blues
Progressive Rock
Sign-off

cable tv
channel 3
3:30 Pixanne
4:00 Today's Woman (local percus-
sionist Lorenzo Brown)
4:30 Something Else
5:00 Stratosphere Playhouse
5:30 Local News
6:00 Consumer Forum
(rights of tenants and
landlords)
6:30 NCAA Super Sports
7:00 Community Dialogue (City
Council members discuss
Monday's election)
aistic Writingr
If you are interest-
ed in reviewing
poetry, and music,
drama, dance, film,
or writing feature
stories a b o ut the
arts: Contact Arts
Editor, c/o The
Michigan Daily.

By GLORIA JANE SMITH
Arts Editor
"You may think I'm self-indul-
gent, honey, but I got to get it
out of my system.'
And so it was . . .The Divine
Miss M stepping out first in 1940's
street gear and then in glittered
skin-tight, voluptuous lame, lay-
ing down a performance that was
at once bitchingly flambouyant,
flashy, erotic and touchingly
humane.
She could have been back at
the Continental Baths, her audi-
ence was so filled with men in
flowing satin and chiffon, rhine-
stone eyes, fluttering feathers
and fans. But, winding down a
tour of some of the "tackiest"
towns in the American wasteland,
Bette Midler found herself Satur-
day night at "Hill Hall" Ann
Arbor. Funkay (spelled F-U-N-
K-Y).
With the strong support of her
four-piece rhythm section and
the Harlettes, her three-woman
"choir," Bette opened quite cor-
dially with "Friends," her en-
trance bringing the audience to
its feet as if to say "your friends
are here."
Traversing the entire length of
the stage, every muscle in mo-
tion, she spread warm greetings
to "one of our hottest audiences."
A woman trained in the dra-
matic arts, Bette is nothing less
than an artiste supreme, able to
project a multitude of moods
through gesture, voice inflection,
facial contortion and total body
movement. Her moods ranged

from the ass-wiggling of "Leader
of the Pack" to the powerfully
quiet strains of "Delta Dawn,"
which she sang standing almost
perfectly still, hands languidly
resting in her pockets.
Bette is best singing and danc-
ing these ass-kicking, high-
energy numbers that force audi-
ences to their feet and raise ap-
plause levels at least ten decible
levels. "Your Love Keeps Lifting
Me (Higher and Higher)," was
one such number. Tearing cross-
stage in frenzied motion, Bette
did the Freddie, hands waving
wildly in the air, stripped to
black pantaloons and a rhine-
stoned lace corset, and finally
huddled in a circle with the Har-
lettes.
But Bette also handles the mel-
oncholy well. To the gentle
strains of Barry Maniow's sen-
sitive piano, The Divine One
mellowed down to the sounds of
John Prine's "Hello in There,"
which bemoans the miserable
pains of growing old. Her voice
swelled to capture the agony.
Promising early in the night to
sing only "some of the grossest
blues," she moved into a Bessie
Smith tune ("Oh, Bessie will be
SO pleased.. .") where her sug-
gestive "quadruple entendre"
pulled off a song that led to her
one word of advice for the even-
ing: "When you get good loving,
don't spread the word. . ." Which
in turn led to a musical tune
that 'most of you can identify
with," where woman tells good-
looking man "You were bad .. .
BAD SEX."
Getting into some "early 60's
tenement" music, straight from
the AmericandBandstand scene
. "I was doing it for all it
was worth then . . . to the telly,
I was GLUED," she positioned
the Harlettes, arms and hips at
correct angles (position: Acute
Hostility), and broke into her
Philadelphia medley (called that

because "it reeks") which slid
smoothly through "Uptown,"
"Don't Say Nothing Bad About
My Baby," and "Dah Do Run
Run."
"Huba-huba time" (Qu'est-ce
que c'est, huba-huba??? "Hot
Shit") brought the forties tune
"Chatanooga Choo choo," when
Bette and the Harlettes worked
up a high-energy routine, index
fingers pointing skyward in true
forties style.
Cleaning up the show for a
moment, Miss M had a few words
for Miss Trish, and then went on
to dedicate to the "clean" lady's
daddy, DICK, her next song,
"The Hustler."
There were really no low spots
in either of the two sets that
Bette brought to the stage. Run-
ning through the cuts off her suc-
cessful debut album, and adding
to that such songs as the soft
and demure "Lullaby of Broad-
way," Bette constantly gave her
audience more and more and
more . . . overcome by her own
energy, driven to repeat the end
stanzas of many of her songs,
building the allready devastating
energy level higher and higher
and higher . .. "I'm really hav-
ing a good time," she told us,
and it was really believable.
Bette works well with her
"friends" on stage. Her rhythm
section, which consists of Barry
Manilow on piano, Luther Rix
on drums, Michael Federal on
bass and Dick Frank on guitar,
never overpowers the great lady's
voice. Instead, they build on each
other's power, surging together
their sounds to create a totally
overwhelming impact. And her
Harlettes, Charlotte Crossly, Gail
Kantor, and Merle Miller, choreo-
graph their steps to compliment,
and never up-stage The Divine
Miss M. For when Bette Midler
performs, the stage is essentially
hers, and hers alone.

The Divine Miss M

Hus ton's Roy Bean
Naivete and murder

R. C. PLAYERS present
THE THREE SISTERS
by ANTON CHEKHOV
Directed by DOUG.SPRIGG

.
yr'.

At Michigan's
Crisler Arena
Sat., April 7
8:00 P.M.
Tickets on Sale at:
MICH. ATHLETIC DEPT.
1000 S. STATE
Prices $5, $4, $3, $2

APRIL 4 - 7 at 8:00
MATINEE: SATURDAY, APRIL 7 at 2:00
EAST QUAD AUDITORIUM
ADMISSION $1.25
Tickets on sale Tuesday, April 3 from 3:00-5:00 p.m. and
one hour before each performance.

I

(oc: o:>o 0 4==)<= >>< <> <==>v<>c
The Deadline for
Submitting New Work
O TO THE
U UNION GALLERY JURY
WILL BE
SUNDAY, APRIL 15 by 5 P.M.
GALLERY HOURS: Wed.-Sun., 12-5 p.m.
Friday Eve., 7-10 p.m.
1 )r " (e " « f O )" () ) t t

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ARTS

r-

What film has run over 110 consecutive weeks at a theatre in Cam-
bridge, Mass., and is still going strong?
THE KING OF HEARTS
with ALAN BATES and GENEVIEVE BUJOLD. Directed by PHILIPPE DE BROCA
A Scotish private; scouting behind enemy lines during W.W. I, goes into a town,
deserted by the Germans, who have left a time-bomb, the townspeople having left
except for the inmates of the local asylum, who he lets loose, thinking they are
the townspeople, and the fun begins.

CUIJURE C.6ALEJLAR
DRAMA-RC Players present Chekov's The Three Sisters In
RC Aud. at 8 tonight. Student Lab Theater presents The
Exorcist and Mrozek's Enchanted Night in Frieze Arena
at 4.
FILM-Ann Arbor Film Co-op presents de Brocka's King of
Hearts in Aud. A, Angell at 7, 9 tonight. Cinema Guild
presents Gold Diggers of 1933 in Arch Aud. at 7, 9:05 to-
night. New World Film Co-op presents Silent Running
in the MLB at 7:30, 9:30 tonight. Psych 171 Film Series
presents Behavior Modification: Teaching Language to
Psychotic Children; Silent Snow, Secret Snow in the
UGLI Multi-purpose Rm. at 4.
GILBERT AND SULLIVAN SOCIETY-Princess Ida: Men-
delssohn at 8 tonight.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC-Bach's Passion According to St. Mat-
thew; U Chamber Choir and Symphony Orchestra in Hill
at 7:30 tonight.
GRAD COFFEE HOUR-E. Conf. Rm., Rackham at 8 tonight.
WEDNESDAY
April 4
GOLDIGGERS OF 1933
The most amazing choreography that mov-
ies have ever seen; staged by the great Bus-
by Berkeley. Screenplay by U.M.'s own Av-
ery Hopwood.
THURSDAY & FRIDAY: CITIZEN KANE
7 and 9 ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM $1

By BRUCE SHLAIN
John Huston has dealt before
in the characterization of men
who are involved with the law
and yet distinctly and heroically
separate from its rules. His di-
rection of Bogart in The Mal-
tese Falcongwasra beautiful por-
trait of the private eye with pri-
vate concerns, the man who dedi-
cates himself to fighting crime,
while remaining aloof, remain-
ing the hardened, eternal oppor-
tunist.
In Roy Bean, Huston presents
a turn-of-the-century man who
is aware of the inevitable split
between man's vision of justice
and what happens West of the
Pecos, a geographical region in-
habited by rattlesnakes and
scoundrels, in that order.
Bean, (Paul Newman), in his
own naive way, thinks that the
split can be totally reconciled by
simply humanizing the law a bit,
namely by proclaiming himself,
a gun in each hand, as the God-
given deity of Justice. His sense
of bltistery self-righteousness
does come as a bit of a surprise,
seeing as he was formerly a
criminal ("I should know the
law; I have spent the better part
of my life in its flagrant viola-
tion.")
The revelation of his purity
comes when he revenges himself
upon a gang of ruffians who had
tried to kill him; it comes in a
grand catharsis of howling and
murder, Bean's initial baptism
into murder.
Bean then perches himself on
a rocking chair, waiting for the
buzzards to finish off his dozen
or so victims. But Reverend La-
Salle (Tony Perkins) rides up
and convinces Bean to bury the
dead ("I've got a shovel if you
don't," he winks). The Rever-
end almost sanctifies what
Bean has done with his psalms
-the killing has been "excused"
religiously, with psalms which
B e a n comically misquotes
throughout the film.
Quickly assembling a corps of

deputies to carry out his arbit-
rary hangings, a town begins to
rise up around Bean, built with
confiscatedamoney. Although a
few of Bean's actions are sav-
agely repulsive, Newman gives
him a powerful comic allure,
turning his Butch Cassidy por-
trayal to serious ends by com-
bining it with a very real and
romantic sense of the Ideal, em-
bodied in his obsessive adoration
of Lily Langtry (Ave Gardner),
an actress he has never seen.
One of the drunken men in
Bean's bar (he sells whiskey as
well as administer justice)
shoots a hole in one of Lily's
pasters, and meets with instant
death at the hands of the gen-
uinely insulted Bean.
Bean does not, however, stay
in power. A snide and puny at-
torney (Roddy McDowell), am-
bitious to become mayor, tries to
have Bean assissinated. But in
the attempt, the assassin kills
not Bean but his bear,sBean's
drinking partner. The bear in-
cidentally, was dropped into the
middle of the picture by Huston
himself, in his role as Grizzly
Adam, a mountain man ready to
die. He discharges the bear to
Bean, who becomes close with
the animal, presumably because
of his own primitivism.
Stacy Keach has a small part
similar to Huston's in its sur-
real overtones. Keach plays the
Original Bad Bob, an albino
badman who eats raw onions and
wants to cut the eyes from Judge
Bean's head. lie makes, how-
ever, the fatal mistake of insult-
ing Miss Lily and Bean calmly
shoots a huge hole in his back.
The unreal appearances of the
bear and Huston and Keach are
reminiscent of the quick inser-
tion of characters inePenn's
Little Big Man the extreme per-
sonalities meant to convey por-
tions of the American subcon-
scious.
Indeed, Huston does extend his
scenario considerably in the
film's second half. Gass, the at-

torney, has taken over the town
with cold, political precision,
taking control when, significantly
enough, Bean was off on a sadly
abortive attempt to see Miss
Lily. Bean, through a series -of
historical references to the fiery
Teddy Roosevelt, begins to repre-
sent the 'Lost Myth of America,
for after he leaves the town
things "just ain't the same."
His return to the town he nur-
tured, twenty years later, is han-
dled ambitiously by Huston, who
films his return with intimations
of an apocalypse at hand. Wield-
ing torch, he answers the query
as to who he is by replying,
"Justice, ya sons a bitches,"
simultaneously igniting the town,
which has become a center for
oil wells and syndicated crime.
As the flames lick at his horse's
heels, 'Bean chases Gass through
the fire, shooting at him but not
lhitting him, not -conquering. The
music written by Maurice Jarre
is, in this sequence, oddly ironic,
carrying with it a sense of wist-
ful andmelancholy loss while
the fighting goes on and Bean's
old deputies fire away at the
state marshals.
The last scenes of the film are
of ironies heaped upon ironies,
as Miss Langtry visits the old
bar named after her and reads
one of the deceased Bean's let-
ters to her, in which he declares
himself her "ardent champion."
Huston's connections of love and
politics are somewhat hazy, but
at the very least The Life and
.Times of Judge Roy Bean
stands as one of the most sensi-
tive treatments of the schizo-
phrenic American politicalper-
sonality, its ideals inextricably
twisted to its harsh and physical
barbarism.

TONlGHT!-April 4th-ONLY!

35mm

7&9p.m.

Local
Poets-

REPLACES "THE GO-BETWEEN" ORIGINALLY SCHEDULED

HOW THE WEST WAS WON!
The myth and the truth, as seen by -the men who civilized the
West, and lived to regret it!
"As ENTERTAINING
as 'BUTCH
CASSIDY'"~
-New York Mag.
IN THE LIFE AND NO SHORTS!
TIME OF "JudgeBean
~ ~ starts promptly
7:05 & 9:10.

I

The Michigan
Daily Arts
Page is now
accepting
poetry for
publication.
Submit work
to Arts Editoi
c/o The Daily.

I

ALL SHOWINGS IN AUDITORIUM "A," ANGELL HALL-$1
TOMORROW EVENING-Francoise Truffaut's THE BRIDE WORE BLACK
tickets for ai of each evening's performances on sale outside the auditorium at 6 p.m.

3rd HIT WEEK!

I

INGMAR BERGMAN'S
RIESAND
WF-IISPERSO

.

0-

y --....--,..--

i

A DANCE PARTY

featured in
this month's
Playboy.
See it while
you-can.<'

"BEST
Picture Director
Screennlav

II -" - - _____ - - I

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