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March 29, 1973 - Image 9

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Michigan Daily, 1973-03-29

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Thursday, March 29, 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

Thursday, March 29, 1973 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Nine

joel greer
Renfrew remembered ...
. A Michigan tradition
AS THE LAST tiny patches of snow gently melt away, one's
mind finds it easy to begin thinking about the joys of summer:
near the swimming pool, on the links, or at the ball park.
But not even nature's gradual warmth can erase the thoughts
of Michigan's winter hockey campaign. And when the Wolverines
take the ice for the first time next fall, there will be someone
missing-someone who will never be replaced.
After 16 seasons behind the Wolverine bench, Al Renfrew has
decided that he's had enough of the glory, the frustrations, the
victories and the defeats, that make up the world of college
coaching.
"I've always loved to coach," said Renfrew from his new
desk in the Michigan ticket office. "But once you start thinking
about quitting, it's time to do just that. By staying around,
it's not fair to the players, your family or yourself."
And Renfrew has been around Michigan for a long time; 28
years to be exact. Except for six years during which he coached
elsewhere, Renfrew has always been involved with the Michigan
hockey program.
"I coached at two other fine hockey schools (Michigan Tech
and North Dakota), but I always knew there was only one place:
Michigan."
Renfrew actually wanted to retire last year, but athletic
director Don Canham wanted to provide him with a place in the
Michigan family upon retirement. After all, it wasRenfrew who
was instrumental in talking Canham into taking his post.
So Renfrew undertook this new endeavour and when Don Weir
conveniently retired this year, Renfrew was trained to take over.
"Al didn't have enough ticket background last year," says
Canham, "We thought he needed another year of experience."
It's nice to know that Renfrew will still be around Michi-
gan hockey, and there's a chance he will be working with
Chuck Kaiton on WAAM's broadcasts next season. Just a few
years ago Renfrew worked as color man with Larry Zimmer
covering Michigan football.
But what will eventually be forgotten was Renfrew's per-
formance the night of any game. Rennie was always the center of
attraction during his prime when he constantly caused havoc
with the officials.
His favorite trick was to borrow the stick of the player nearest
him, and slam the boards letting the referee know he was dis-
satisfied. "You have to get involved," Renfrew once said, "just
to prevent getting ulcers."
Renfrew started his hockey career at De La Salle High
School in Toronto which competed in an Ontario Junior "B"
amateur league. After completing high school, he came to
Michigan in 1945 not knowing that college hockey was to be his
full-time career.
A protoge of his brother-in-law Vic Heyliger, Renfrew was a
standout with the icers between 1946 and 1949. He was a member
on the highest scoring line in Michigan history and had the honor
of playing for Michigan in the first NCAA Tournament.
The 8-4 victory over Dartmouth in the final game gave
Michigan its first championship. Since then, the Wolverines
have added to their laurels by winning six more titles. No
other school can boast that record.
Renfrew's leadership qualities were even evident in his youth
as he was chosen to captain the 1948-49 team.
After graduating from the school of education in 1949, Rennie
worked as a lithographer and played with the Windsor Spitfires
of the International League.
He received his first chance at coaching in 1951 when he
moved to a small engineering school in Houghton, now known
as Michigan Tech. That first year was a nightmare for Al as the
Huskies finished with a 2-18 overall record. But Renfrew
remained at Houghton for another four years.
"We brought our program along from that dismal first
season until we finished second in the nation in 1956," he proudly
commented.
Ironically, Michigan won the title that year, knocking off the
Huskies 7-5 in the final. Since Renfrew's reign at Michigan Tech,
the Huskies have continued to be one of the country's top hockey
powers.
Renfrew coached at North Dakota the following year (and
produced an 18-11 record) before taking the Michigan job in
1957. Rennie replaced Michigan's most successful coach, Vic
Heyliger, who ran up an unbelievable six championships in a
nine year span, an unbelievable job to say the least.

Now it's time for someone to assume Renfrew's spot on the
Wolverine bench, a spot that has grown with tradition. Rennie is
leaving behind five Big Ten championship teams (1961, 1962, 1964,
1968 and 1969), and the WCHA and NCAA championship club, in
1964.
That 1964 championship was extremely gratifying to Renfrew
as the Wolverines defeated Denver 6-3 in the Pioneer's home rink.
"That was my greatest thrill," says Renfrew, "and my second
greatest thrill was that final victory of the season at North Dakota.
A that game Renfrew received the game puck, and watched
the Michigan players. "really get that feeling of Michigan's
winning tradition."
When Dan Farrell takes his position on the Michigan bench
next fall, let's hope he can continue that great Michigan tradition.

Sabres blast Flyers;

i
,extend
By The Associated Press
BUFFALO, N.Y. - Shifty Gil
Pscored twice in a little
I more than two minutes last night
to start the Buffalo Sabres on their
way to a much-needed 6-3 victory
over the Philadelphia Flyers in a
fracas - filled National H o c k e y
League game.
Don Luce also scored twice for
Buffalo.
Referee Bruce Hood meted out
a total of 130 penalty minuttes in
the contest, plus awarded an auto-
matic goal when a disgruntled Fly-
er threw his stick on a Buffalo
breakaway in the closing seconds.
Buffalo's win gave the Sabres a
three-point lead over Detroit in the
hot battle for fourth place in the
NHL's East Division, but the Wings
have three games left, the Sabres
but one.
The scoreless opening period was
interrupted twice by fights. The
first, involving several players,
,held up the game for nearly 20
j minutes and resulted in 84 minutes
in penalties.

l'
'

4th

place

lead

daily
sports
NIGHT EDITORS
qty ,s w Tr r nwrrrr

Rangers exposed ,
NEW YORK - Phil Esposito, the
National Hockey League's leading
scorer, connected for four goals
last night, pacing the Boston Bru-
ins to a 6-3 shellacking, of the
slumping New York Rangers.
The triumph clinched second

RETIRING WOLVERINE HOCKEY coach Al Renfrew tickles the, twine in a 1948 NCAA tournament
contest against Boston College. Renfrew, who was a star for Michigan during the 40's, has the
unique distinction of having played on the first N CAA championship team in Wolverine history and
also coaching the last NCAA championship team for the U. of M.

FRANK LONGO place in the NHL's East divis
DAN BORUS for the Bruins, defending Stan,
Cub champions, who dre'W 1
Buffela gained a 4-2 lead during third-place Rangers in the play-
the second period., Perreault scored next Wednesday night.
after 24 seconds on a pass from Esposito, raising his goal p
t Rick Martin, then scored again at . duction to 55 for the season; brc
2:27 with a sizzling shot from the a 3-3 tie with a pair of third-per:
blue line as he raced down the ice goals, one on a power play. Earli
at full speed. he had scored while out killing
Rene Robert then tallied for the penalty to put the Bruins in fr+
Sabres on a 20-foot shot before 3-1.
Bill Flett got Philadelphia's first New York's Mike Murphy z
goal on a 35-footer during a power Boston's Wayne Cashman swapl
play. Luce got one for Buffalo, first-period goals with Esposito
from a sharp angle, and Bill Clem- sisting on Cashman's score. I
ent retaliated for the Flyers with five points for the night gave E:
a 20-foot backhander. 127 for the -season.
Martin made it 5-3 early in the
final period with his 38th goal of ( n y
the season while the Flyers were stickm ei:
short-handed, but Terry Crisp came
back to score for Philadelphia r t
about five minutes later. open season
With 18 seconds remaining, Luce
was awarded an automatic goal c
when he broke in on the empty The University of Michigan I
Philadelphia net after goalie Doug crosse Club B" team opens
Favell had been withdrawn and season tonight by battling L'A j
two fiesty Flyers threw their sticks Crouse on the Ferry Field tart
at him. Luce fell before he got off turf. Game time is at 7:'00 p.m
the -shot, but the goal was auto- ! The "B" team is organized
matic under NHL regulations. give newer players valuable pt
ing time and experience. T
j - year's squad features a fine goa
in Charlie Crone. Crone has h
S C O U E S I up only two goals in this three a
C 1 pearances this year.

ssion
nley
the
poff
prb-
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lier,
ig a
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afid
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His
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BATSMEN AWAIT OPENER

/Ar " "
I lc a1
x
By MARC FELDMAN
The Michigan baseball team,
sporting a collection of proven
veterans and promising new-
comers, opens the Northern part
of its schedule with a double-
; header against Eastern Michigan
next Tuesday at Ray Fisher
Stadium.
Michigan, third in the Big Ten
a year ago witha 9-5 record, will
play home twinbills with EMU,
Detroit, and Bowling Green be-
y fore the conference opener at
Purdue, April 13.
Wolverine Coach Moby Bene-
dict is optimistic about his
team's chances this season, as
well he might be. Although Mich-
igan won just one game in eight
on the spring trip to Arizona
three weeks ago, Benedict has
three-quarters of his infield,
three-quarters of his pitching
staff, two-thirds of his outfield,
and his starting catcher back
for the 1973 campaign.
Pat Sullivan, one of the two
left-handed batters in Michigan's
starting lineup, will be counted
;Ion to supply a powerful bat to
the Wolverine attack. Sullivan
NHL Stondings

hitting: Looking solid',

hit .336 last year with 14 extra
base hits and 19 runs batted in
for an outstanding .539 slugging
percentage. The 6'-1" s e n i o r
made just two errors in 249 field-
ing chances at first base in 1972.
The other lefty batter in
Benedict's lineup is Mike De
Cou, who had a disappointing
spring trip (.111) but De Cou
led the 1972 Wolverines in RBIs
with 21 and hit .290 as Michi-
gan's regular right fielder.
Although the team is blessed
with some high caliber veter-
ans, some of the missing per-
formers are just as note-worthy.
Greg Buss has fallen victim to
a knee injury left over from
the basketball season and slug-
ger Leon Roberts, who would
have been a senior this year,
took his .367 batting average
and 19 RBIs to the professional
ranks last summer.
Buss, a .328 hitter and defen-
sive standout in center field, fig-
ured prominently in Benedict's
pre-season planning but his loss
may be somewhat overcome by
the emergence of freshman Dan
Damiani in the middle of the..
outfield. « Damiani was easily'
the most pleasant surprise of

this spring trip as he played
flawlessly in, the field and strok-
ed seven hits in 25 at bats for
a commendable .280 average.
Other Wolverines have felt
the injury hex, but at least one
ailment had nothing to do with
baseball. Bill Meyer, who had
won the third base job, had an
appendectomy last week. Al-
though he returned to practice
yesterday, he will open the sea-
son Tuesday on the bench. The
third sacker opening day will
be either Chris Burak or Mark
Mills.
Michigan will have exper-
ience in the keystone combo of
Mark Crane, at short, and Brian
Balaze, at second. Crane hit
.288 and Balaze was one of the
biggest surprises of the 1972
campaign with a .353 average
in 21 games. Veteran Tom Ket-
tinger will join Damiani and De
Cou in the outfield. Kettinger
hit .346 in Arizona and tied for
the team lead in homers with
three last year.
College baseball has joined the
American League in adopting the
designated hitter rule, but odd-
ly enough two of Michigan's

leading candidates for the po-
sition normally are employed
on the mound. Craig Forhan,
who batted a superb .471 last
year will hit for himself when
he's pitching and . swing for
some of his hurling comrades in
other games.
Peter Ross, who sat out last
year after transferring from
Vermont, is also listed as a
pitcher but he might play some
outfield and serve as the DH.
Benedict bemoaned the peren-
nial nemesis of local baseball
coaches-the weathr. "Since we
came back from Arizona three
weeks ago we've practiced three
times outdoors."
He added, "Practicing one day
in Yost and another outside is
the hardest thing for the play-
ers, especially the infielders.
It's easy to get confused about
how the ball bounces. When we
do go outside, it's like taking a
bath with your shoes on."
Read Daily
Classifieds

La-
its
We
rtan
M.
I to
Aay-
This
)atle
riven
ap.

I

--

NHL
Montreal 4, Chicago 3
Boston 6, New York 3
Pittsburgh 6, Atlanta 3
Buffalo 6, Philadelphia 3
NBA
Houston 138, Buffalo 122
Detroit 131, Cleveland 119, overtime
e

Other stars include crease de-
fenseman Charlie White and at-
tackman Terry Cotter. White is
a ably assisted ondefense by Paul
Smith, Neal Shaver, and Tom Mur-
phy. Cotter is aided on attack by
Pete Drehman, an excellent face-
off man.

01+js

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t
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r

/ M 0 OD
('y1lV1RJ U THE ,
wG 1N LI
a D

Montreal
Boston
'New York
Buffalo
Detroit
Toronto
Vancouver
! Islanders
Chicago
Minnesota
Philadelphia
St. Louis
Los Angeles
Pittsburgh
Atlanta
'California

East Division
W L T Pts.
50 10 16 116
51 20 5 107
47 22 7 101
36 27 14 86
36 28 11 83
25 41 9 59
22 46 8 52
12 59 5 29

GF
319
324
293
254
254
230
227
164

GA
180
223
200
218
231
268
330
333

Michigai

West Division
42 26 8
37 30 9
35 29 11
31 33 11
3034 11
:31 36 9
25 37 24
14 46 14

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PETITIONS j?
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n Union Board of Directors
Office of
'K:h:"
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available at 3200 S.A.B. 8:30-4:30 M-F'
be returned by April 13, 1973 ':..n,
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92
83
81
r3
71
71
64
44

278 217
247 224
278 247
222 243
223 236
250 254
185 231
197 330

STUf

Petitions are ;

Must

efloxk
'rRE

TM

Bud Drinkers,
you figure IS out*
Joe walked into a bar one day wanting to buy 4 quarts of Budweiserm. His
friends Bob and Fred were less thirsty and wanted to buy only 3 quarts each.
This particular bar sold only Budt on tap, and either in 3-quart pitchers or
5-quart pitchers. Using these pitchers as measures, pouring the Bud from one
to the other, how did the bartender measure out exactly 3 quarts for Bob,
3 quarts for Fred, and 4 quarts for Joe?

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