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March 27, 1973 - Image 9

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Michigan Daily, 1973-03-27

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11 Tuesday, March 27, 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

Tuesday, March 27, 1973 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Nine

Walton

mangles

Memphis

From Wire Se
Bill Walton's
individual hero
ed for the erra
teammates an
UCLA Bruins
consecutive na
ball champion
87-66 victory
State.
Walton's 44 poi
incredible 21 succ
out of 22 attemp
cord for individue
AA championship
The wide marg
victory overshado
by Memphis Sta
spired performa
Kenon and Larry
the Tigers with
Kenon added 20.
The pattern fo

rvice Reports the boards began to take its toll, away from Kenon at all costs, and providence pounded
overwhelming dland several players for both sides Keith Wilkes broke out of a first-L I
ics compensat- R began piling up personal fouls, half slump to hit several shots master POUr ndiana frHoosiers
With 4:14 to go in the first period, from outside, reducing the burden tip-off last night and
an Walton. ~~~opening tpofls ih n
tcply0hiKenon forced Walton to commit onhupe Walton.9-9 orthr
Ld gave t h e nhisthird foul of the game, imt n As the Memphis State defense humped theFriars 97-79Colleg t
their \ seventh ' pelling Bruin coach John Wooden adjusted slightly to the outside, basketball championship.
tional basket- to bench his superstar and insert Uclan guard Greg Lee took ad-
ship with an NIGHT EDITOR Swen Nader for the remainder of vantage with his patented passes Providence played without 6-foot-
ship withhan THERESA SWEDO the period. to the rim which Walton would 8 star Marvin Barnes, who suf-
over Memphis It was obvious the outcome grab and deflect through the hoop. fered a severe knee sprain in
would depend upon two things: Walton picked up his fourth foul Saturday's 98-85 loss to Memphis
nts, inudestablished early. Walton scored how rapidly Walton would pick up !with 9:27 to go in the game, and State in the semi-finals, and was
t, including an 6sofeUCels first10 poitstonelaoahissf
cessful field goals 6 of UCLA's first 10 points on lay- his fourth goul, and what effect the game entered its decisive min- severely beaten off the oards.
ts, set a new re ups and short jumpers, while Ke- Walton's foul trouble would have ute. As Walton hung back, Larry: All-American Ernie DiGregorio
al scoring in NC-non matched him basket for bas- on his play. At the beginning of Farmer crashed through for a had an unspectacular final game
games. ket. UCLA adjusted, with Walton the second period, Walton played driving layup, and shortly there- as a collegian. The 6-footer scored
gin of the UCLA giving Kenon much more atten- with notable caution, not going after Wilkes hit two successive out- 17 points, well below his average,
wed a fine effort tion, at which point Memphis State after some rebounds or stuffs side jumpers, the second of which but when he left the game with
te, especially in- began passing the ball to Finch, which he ordinarily might have became a three-point play when :08 remaining, he still received a
nces by Larry whose outside shooting and mas- attempted to get. Wilkes was fouled. For all intents standing ovation.
Finch. Finch led tery at the free throw line kept the But as the period progressed, and purposes, the game was on ice Steve Downing, Indiana's 6-8
29 points, while Tigers in the game throughout the: Walton became progressively less for UCLA from then on. senior, and Ritter received match-
first half. inhibited and accordingly more ef- The difficulty of UCLA's victory, ing attention from Hoosier fans.
r the game was The tough, physical play around fective. The Bruins adjusted their and the dominant role of Walton, Kevin Stacom was Providence's
defense so as the keep the ball: immediately sparked speculation brightest performer, hitting a game-
about a possible early death for game-high 29 points.
Big~ Bad Walton the UCLA dynasty. UCLA won this Sixth-ranked Indiana, which had
title without having to play also- as many as four freshmen on the
OT.UCLA-87 undefeated North Carolina State, floor at times, finished with a 22-6
WilkesLlFG FT T champion of the tough Atlantic record. Eastern independent Provi-
Farmer10-z Coast conference, and without WaI- dente, ranked fourth, lost both its
Walton 21 2-5 44 ;ton, UCLA may well have been up- St. Louis battles to finish with a
Lee 1 3-3 5 set by Memphis State, :#27-4 mark.

x:.Y _:: chuck bloomq
Big Orange country . .
a littlesour
1HE FIRST THING one notices about Knoxville, Tennessee is
that everything, but everything is orange and white. Auto
dealers sell orange and white cars, the decor in hotel rooms is
your basic orange and even at McDonald's and Arby's the straws
are orange and white. When they say, "This is Big Orange Coun-
try," they mean it.
But despite all the hype, Big Orange country doesp't rate.
The city is tacky and the campus stresses the gauche.
Knoxville and the university is full of sex. Much like the strip-
per taunting an audience, the Tennessean love of sex and its
place in society is flaunted before the tourist's eyes. And what
better time to exhibit your wares than a NCAA meet.
Everywhere one turns in Knoxville, sexual come-ons are
prominent. On the back of the complimentary television guide
available at all major hotels is a full page ad for a massage par-
lor. "A New Dimension in MASSAGE" it screams, and, for the
interested but lost, there is a map.
The use of the feminine body to attract attention is not limit-
ed to the back of shabby TV magazines. The Knoxville papers
are fond of using scantily clad women as fillers.
On Friday the Knoxville Journal ran one picture sur-
rounded by print. Flanked by stories of a political spy trial
and prisoner of war releases was a picture of a beautiful girl
clad only in a skimpy bikini lying on an Australian beach.
Just to insure that the style rule was not violated, the paper
ran similar pictures on Saturday.
But the most blatant example of this tacky approach, came
during the swim meet itself. The opening ceremony of the Na-
tional Anthem was pure Americana, Tennessee-style. The colors
were presented by two orange-bikini clad girls in a canoe. They
were paddled to the center of the Student Aquatic Center pool
by a an dressed in a buckskin jacket and a raccoon hat. Deeply
moved by this spectacle of patriotism, the crowd, mostly Ten-
nesseans, belted out the anthem with the fervor of a revival
meeting.
Given the atmosphere of the city, it is not surprising that sex
is also a big part of the recruiting at Tennessee. Potential pros-
pects are often fixed up with one of the members of the Timettes;
a select group of about forty women chosen solely upon looks.
In the office of head coach Ray Bussard is a sign with a
letter from a former Volunteer swimmer. It has the picture
of a well-endowed girl ripping off her flimsy top with the en-
couraging statement "I hope this will be a small inspiration
to your team for the upcoming season.,,
When Knoxville is not flaunting bodies, it flaunts its wealth.
In swimming alone there are sixteen full rides a year for future
Vols. The entire campus is brand new, giving the place the air of
a collection of new Howard Johnson restaurants.
Much of the money is being poured into athletic programs.
A new dorm to house all the athletes was built within the last
two years as was the Aquatic Center where the meet was held.
The new pool cost four million dollars, all from student
funds, and much of it is a waste. The facility is a poor one
with the pool being too shallow and the stands too far away
from the action. The starting blocks are located under a con-
crete overhang and all too often swimmers bump their heads
against it.
The championship meet was run the same as the Ringling
Bros. Circus which was in town the same time. It was really
bush to introduce the home team separately from everyone else.
The Volunteers came charging out of a Big Orange T, replete
in raccoon hats and nummerals on the backs. No scorecards, just
numbers.
The public address announcer would work the partisan crowd
into a frenzy whenever a Vol was swimming, even if it was a
meaningless preliminary race. The Timettes went throughout
the crowd passing out . . you guessed it, big oranges.
There is little, if any, concern on the campus about educa-
tion. One reporter gave an apt evaluation of Tennessee, "First
comes girls, segond is sports, and last is education."
Somehow it seems that the NCAA could have found a better
place for its swimming showcase.,

Holyfld 4 0-0 8

Curtis
Meyers
Nater
Frnkln
Carson
Webb
Tearm
Buford
Kenon
Robinsn
Laurie
Finch
Westfll
Cook
McKney
Jones
Tetzlff
Liss
Andrws
Team

1 2-2 4
2 0-0 4
1 0-0 2
1 0-1 2
0 0-0 0
0 0-0 0
40 '7-li87
MEMPHIS STATE-66
FG FT T
3 1-2 ~7
8 4-4 20
3 0-1 6
0 0-0 0
9 11-13 29
0 0-0 0
1 2-2 4
0 0-0 0
0 0-0 0
0 0-2 0
0 0-0 0
0 0-0 0
24 18-24 66

BRAVES ASK WAIVER
Bye Denny2
ST. PETERSBURG (P--The At- before a series of off-the-field prob-
lanta Braves announced last night lems resulted in several suspen-
that they have asked waivers on sions by Commissioner Bowie Kuhn
veteran pitcher Denny McLain for and his eventual trade to the then
the purpose of giving him his un- Washington Senators in 1970, for
conditional release. whom he lost 22 games. He moved
McLain, who celebrated his 29th on to Oakland last spring.
birthday Thursday, had pitched_
only two innings this spring and
had an earned run average ofI
9.00. He was 3-7 with the Braves SCOR ES
last year after being acquired in _

AP Photo
You took my ball away, cries Larry Hollyfield to Larry Kenon (35), as Kenon took this rebound away
from Hollyfield. Despite Kenon's rebounding and 20 points, UCLA managed to pull this one out of the
fire last night, as they won 87-66.

SCORE BY PERIODS

1 2 T.
UCLA 39 48-87
MEMPHIS STATE 39 27-66
Fouled out-Westfall.
Total fouls - UCLA 18, Memphis
IState 17.
sT echnical fouls-Kenon, Hollyfield.
A-19,301
Russell
joinls lop
rookies
NEW YORK (1P) - Sophomore
David Thompson of North Carolina
State was the only unanimous
choice in the All-Rookie team an-
nounced yesterday by the National
Asociation of Collegiate Basketball
Writers.
The writers chose 15 players,
combining freshmen and sopho-
mores playing their first varsity
seasons.
Joining Thompson among the first
five chosen were Notre Dame soph
John Schumate, James "Fly" Wil-
liams, a freshman at Austin Peay,
Louis Dunbar, a Houston sopho-
more, and Raymond Lewis, a
sophomore from Los Angeles State.
Maurice Lucas of Marquette,
Michigan's Campy Russell, Henry
Williams of Jacksonville, Ron Haig-
ler of Pennsylvania, all sopho-
mores, and freshmen Coniel Nor-:
man of Arizona, Quinn Buckner of
Indiana, Leon Douglas of Alabama,
John Lucas of Maryland and Mike
Arizin of William and Mary, com-
plete the team.
NEW AT
BIMBO'S
NO COVER CHARGE
OLD TIME MOVIES
MON. ONE WEEK
& Buster Keaton
TU ES. MASQUERADOR
starts Charlie Chaplin
at 8:30
AND MANY MORE
BIMBO'S
114 E. WASHINGTON
BEER, WINE & COCKTAILS

Return

mid-season from Oakland. He had
a 0-2 record with the A's and was
3-3 in a brief stay with Birming-
ham of the Southern Association.
M c L a i n was the American
League's Cy Young Award winner
in 1968 when he helped Detroit to
the world championship with a 31-61
record, becoming baseball's first
30-game winner since Dizzy Dean
of the St. Louis Cardinals in 1934.
He won 24 games and shared the
Cy Young Award with Baltimore's
Mike Cuellar the following year

EXHIBITION BASEBALL
Chicago (A) 8, Pittsburgh 3
Texas 6, Baltimore 4
Houston 15, Detroit 9
St. Louis 3, Boston 2
Chicago (N) 7, California I
Cincinatti 8, Philadelphia 4
Montreal 9, Minnesota 8
Oakland 10, San Diego 1
New York (N) 5, Atlanta 2
NBA
Portland 113, Buffalo 107
ABA
Dallas 112, Carolina 110
--_

NO s
to council * lst ward * Dc

THOMAS
emocrot

PEACE CORPS & VISTA
Need Medical & Health Professionals
for programs at home & throughout the
world.
Recruiters will be in the

NURSING
March 28 &

SCHOOL LOBBY
29-9 a.m.-4:30 p.m.

A NEW JOURNAL IN
PEACE & CONFLICT STUDIES
There is now an opportunity for undergraduate students
to participate in the production of a new journal. This pub-
lication will promote scholarly and dispassionate research on
conflict and its resolution. The focus will range from the intra-
personal to the international level and will encompas all
fields from psychology to political science.
Interested in submitting articles or otherwise helping with
production? Come talk with us in L-7 Winchell Hall, West
Quad (immediately behind the Union) from 1-3 p.m., Wed.
and Fri., or call Bob Aicher at 971-7535.
Sponsored by the Peace Research Applications Group
Harry's Army Surplus
1166 BROADWAY, ANN ARBOR
(near Plymouth Rd.)
OPEN 9-6 Mon.-Sat. (near Plymouth Rd.) 769-9247
JUST RELEASED.. .
NEW and USED
MILITARY
SURPLUS
G.I. Knapsacks 5.49
Rain Parkas .. . 4.28
Space Blankets . 1.98

I have a record on which I am more than pleased to run. Voters can
look at that record and infer what my position will bb on most issues
that will be confronting Council in the next two years.
I SUPPORTED THE FOLLOWING LEGISLATION WHICH PASSED:
* Affirmative Action Ordinance
a: Am mendments to Human Rights Ordinance re: sexual preference, mari-
tal status & education association.
* Approval for Police-Community relations training programs.
* Amendments to strengthen the sign Ordinance.
0 Anti-Strike Breaker Ordinance.
* City funds for free clinic, child care center, Ozone House & Commu-
nity Parks Program.
. Amend City Charter to permit local parties on ballot.
* Supported legislation which has restricted the use of land by com-
mercial interests.
Paid for by the Committee to Re-elect Norris Thomas
It
ProUdly A nnounCes
+ A N A UTOGRA PH PA RTY
'Ea
14
o POETRY READING
byAI
losif rodsk
RUSSIAN
POET-IN-RESIDENCE
TMORROW
Wednesday, March 28
1:00 P.M.
The largest collection of Mr. Brodsky's poetry in translation
mill then be available. Refreshments will be served. ALL ARE
WELCOME.

m® '. ; R irnr r rrrrfc whn r/n nnf ru_

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