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March 25, 1973 - Image 6

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Michigan Daily, 1973-03-25

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Page six

i HE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, March 25, 1973

Page Six IHE MICHIGAN DAiLY ~undoy, March 25, 1973

'U' labs provide frogs for
research facilities nationwide

(Continued from Page 1)
what Gruschow calls "the World
Famous Guttman Saddle Frog".
Guttman was a rare albino mutant
whose pigment was concentrated
in a saddle-shaped spot on his
back.
Tremendously proud of Guttman,
they kept him around, hoping he
would spawn a son or daughter;
with a saddle. Today Guttman and
his disappointingly normal off-
spring float placidly in bottles of
formaldehyde on a shelf.

and workers can follow their pro-
gress in the culture dishes.
Besides providing frogs to other
laboratories, research goes on in
the facility itself. Students at Mich-'
igan, as well as others from local
high schools and from several
nearby colleges, are able to use the
facility.
Since many of the species are
being raised in captivity for the
first time, a lot of research must
go into their diet. The results are
often surprising.

of the frogs eat bugs.: crickets,.
flies, and sowbugs bought from
neighborhood kids at 50 cents per
hundred.
Once you know how to raise
them, there's a wealth of import-
ant research to do on humble frogs.
Frogs are comparable to all other
vertebrates in their development,
explains Dr. George Nace, director
of the facility.
"The nice thing is that because
tadpoles develop outside the fe-
male, all the stages of develop-
ment are out where you can see
them," he says.
Since they can be raised in such
large numbers, frogs make statis-
tically significant sample sizes for
study of drugs suspected to cause
birth defects,, Nace adds. The skin
of a frog is similar to the human
kidney, and has been widely used
to study the effects of drugs on
ha kidn -An d ~n fmn in

Guttman was lucky though. Most Young tadpoles, for instance, eat
of the amphibians at the facility pressure-cooked lettuce. Xenopus
do not reproduce naturally, Grus- frogs must have Goodman's brand
chow says, since artificial insemi- kosher pea soup. It's the only
nation is much quicker and more brand they survive on, Gruschow
efficient. says.
After hormone treatment, he ex- Some enterprising high school
plains, a female frog is "stripped" student found that though frogs
of her eggs, which are placed in a generally won't eat anything but
culture dish where sperm from a live crickets, but they'll gobble up
male are spread over them. In dead ones if you add a little Accent
three days, tadpoles begin to form, flavor enhancer. Of course, most
Musical extravaganza

(Continued from Page 3)
the players are often just not
together.,
* * *
Bach - The Complete F I ut e
Sonatas; Jean-Pierre Rampal,
flute; Robert Veyron-Lacroix,
harpsichord; Jean Huchot, cel-
lo. Odyssey (Y2 31925).
A big hooray and welcome
back to the catalogue for this

glorious recording from the de-
leted Epic series. Rampal, whose
later efforts can be spotty, su-
perb though his musicianship
is, shows no flaws in this two-
record set, which contains the
four sonatas for flute and harp-
sichord, three for flute and con-
tinuo, and the unaccompanied
sonata. A must for the basic
record library.

jthe e iney. ana a tumort ound in
the kidney of some frogs has much
in common with several human tu-
mors.
"It's always tricky to interpret
from one species to another," Nace
comments. "It's no easier to com-
pare mice with humans, than it is
to compare mice with frogs or
frogs with humans. The frog model
gives us an opportunity to do ex-
periments that can't be done with
other vertebrates."
AUBURN, N. Y. (UPI) - A few
eyebrows were raised when a state
audit of the Cayuga County Sher-
iff's Department found listed an
appropriation of $103.67 for "reef-
ers," a common slang term for
marijuana cigarettes.
Sheriff Robert Sponable explain-
ed a reefer is also a heavy, double-
breasted winter coat, two of which
had been purchased by his depart-
ment at a cost of $103.67.

ENASCT bike
study data
released
(Continued from Page 1)
could possibly help with the ripoff
situation.
The fact that 78 per cent of the
people who said they were not
registered with the city would reg-
ister with the University might in-
dicate how popular a good registra-
tion system could be.
56 per cent of the students re-
plying agreed with the idea of a
double copy of the city registra-
tion to be carried on the person,
possibly acting as a check of
someone suspiciously handling a
bicycle.
INGMAR BERGMAN'S
aRIESAND
WAHbS.PERS
\ I
''BEST
Picture Director
Screenplay 0
Actress (Liv Ullman)
--N.Y. Film Critics Awards
..._---_-___--
"Nothing That Bergman Has Done
Before Is Likely to Prepare You
for 'Cries & Whispers.' It Stands
Alone and It Reduces Almost
Everything Else Youi're Likely to
Se This Season to the Size of a
Small Cinder."
-vincent Canby, N.Y. Times
Sat., Sun., & Wed. at
1, 3, 5, 7, 9
Mon. & Tues. at
7 p.m. & 9 p.m. Only
BONUS SHORT
The hit of last year's
Ann Arbor Film Festival
"HEAVENLY STAR"

.4

F
j

1001 E. Huron
AT FLETCHER
SUNDAY
10:30 a.m.-"Goals for the Second Century
World Mission"-Rev. Paul Hostetter
5:30-Student Supper

of

6:45-"Man in a Box: There's
Way to Skin a Pigeon"-

University
Reformed
Church

More Than One

Use Daily Classifieds

DR. ALAN RICE; BILL BENISH, senior in psych.
- - - -

Today's staff
News: Gordon Atcheson, Cindy Hill,
Eugene Robinson
Arts Page: Diane Levick, Mara Shap
Photo Technician: Karen Kasmauski

Cheryl Pilate,
iro

MONDAY, MARCH 26
Dr. Frances E. Svensson
Assoc. Professor, Department of Political Science
SPEAKS ON
"MAN AND HIS FELLOW MEN (1I)"
Various Schools of Thought, Their Origins, Development
4th LECTURE OF A SERIES entitled
MAN AND HIS WAYS
7:30-9:00 P.M.
International Center Recreation Room
603 E. Madison
Informal discussion follows lecture
REFRESHMENTS WILL BE SERVED

LSCOFFEE HOUR
TUESDAY
3:00-4:30
MARCH 27
The, Herbarium
2009 North University Bldg.
EVERYONE WELCOME

Professor of English Literature at Tehran
sently Visiting Professor at the Universities
Utah, prominent literary critic and writer.

University, pre
of Texas and

THE CENTER FOR NEAR EASTERN & NORTH AFRICAN STUDIES
THE DEPT. OF NEAR EASTERN LANGUAGES & LITERATURES
THE PROGRAM IN COMPARATIVE LITERATURES
ANNOUNCE
MINI-COURSE 416,
(All Lectures Open to Public)
New Literary Idioms in the
Near East: Iran, Lebanon, Turkey
GUEST SPEAKERS:
DR. REZA BARAHENI

,

--- rff
_ _..._.._.__.._.___._ . .---- - I

MONDAY, 8:00 P.M., MARCH 26

ANGELL HALL

AUDITORIUM C

ISRAEL OR PALESTINE:
A questio of legitimacy; a problem of ethics.
PROF. DONNA R. DIVINE
Assoc. Prof. of Government, Smith College
A public lecture with a respondent from an alternative perspective. Fol-
lowed by discussion.
Sponsored by Hillel Foundation, Unitarian Church,
Office of Religious Affairs

DR. HALIM BARAKAT
Professor of Sociology at the American University of Beirut,
presently Research Fellow at the Center for Middle Eastern
Studies, Harvard University, well-known Lebanese writer,
DR. ILHAN BASGOZ
Professor in the Department of Uralic and Altaic Studies,
Indiana University, specialist in folklore and literature.
SCHEDULE:
March 26 - INTRODUCTION I - 3-4 P.M. - 35 Angell Hall
(Assoc. Profs. John Kolars and John Clark)
March 27 -- INTRODUCTION 1I - 3-4 P.M. - 35 AngelI Hall
BARAHENI -- 4-5 P.M. -- 35 Angell Hall
Contemporary Writers of Iran
March 28 - BARAKAT - 3-5 P.M. - 200 Lane Hal
Social and Political Themes in Modern Arabic Literatures
March 29 - BASGOZ - 3-4 P.M. - 35 Angell Hait
The Function of Oral Literature in a Multi-Racial Society
ROUND-UP -- 4-5 P.M. - 35 Angell Hall
(NOTE FOR STUDENTS: Course open for one credit to undergrads
and grads: undergrads pass/fail, grads apply to Rackham for cre-
dit by grade. No knowledge of languages required. Readings In
translation will be assigned. A paper is required, due spring term;
upon submission of papers a temporary grade of Y will be changed
appropriately.)
REGISTRATION by drop/add form in Room 3074 Frieze Bldg.
DEADLINE MARCH 27. Additional information, reading lists, etc.
available in Room 3074 Frieze Bldg.

A

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