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March 25, 1973 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-03-25

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Sunday, March 25, 1973

iHE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Sunday, March 23, 1973 iHE MICHIGAN DAILY

mmmm - -

-

Music extravaganza
in classical albums

written by NEIL SIMON
directed by ELAINE MAY
"ONE OF THE
YEAR'S BEST"
-N.Y. TIMES
-NEWSWEEK
-TIME
-NEW YORKER
2 ACADEMY AWARD
NOMINATIONS
Jeannie Berlin, best
supporting Actress.
Eddie Albert, best
supporting Actor.

By DONALD SOSIN
Monster Concert. 10 pianos /
16 pianists. Performers from
the Eastman School of Music,
Samuel Adler, conductor.
Works by Sousa, Rossini,
Strauss, Joplin and Gottschalk.
Columbia (M 31726)
Musical extravaganzas such as
the one represented on this disc
are hard to come by these days,
as far as the classical world is
concerned. One can find endless
examples of super sessions and
assorted jams at rock concerts,
but few similar encounters among
classical musicians. Here, though,
is a sampling of the sort of thing
that was quite common a hun-
dred years ago - aside f r o m
operas, oratories and other spec-
tacles, there were also great
gatherings of musical forces for
various reasons throughout the
19th century. Sometimes char-
ity was the cause, but more of-
ten a desire for showmanship on
a grand scale was the propel-
lant for these affairs.
The American composer Louis
M. Gottschalk (1829-1869) wrote
in his entertaining memoirs,
". . . My orchestra consisted of
650 performers, 87 chorusters,
15 solo singers, 50 drums and 80
trumpets - that is to say, near-
ly 900 persons bellowing a n d

TODAY AT i-3-5-7-9

I

blowing to see who could scream
the loudest . ."
Everyone is used to seeing 100
orchestra musicians on a stage,
but the thought of ten pianos
is something else. The results of
such an event, recorded in Ro-
chester, N.Y. last year, are pre-
served on this disc, and they are
'generally quite entertaining.
Noted concert pianists Eugene
List and Frank Glazer are the
chief performers, aided by other
members of the Eastman facul-
ty, and graduate students.
The "William Tell Overture" is
the high point of the album, as
List and Glazer play Gottschalk's
arrangement for jour hands,
with four other pianists adding
support in the louder sections.
Although the "Long Ranger'.' sec-
tion doesn't quite come off, there
are many wonderful moments,
and some fabulous trills and fili-
gree work that make this a rare
listening experience.
"Thunder and Lightning" Pol-
ka by Johann Strauss, Jr., makes
effective use of spatial arrange-
ment of the pianos, with humor-
ous dialogues between left and
right channels. The same device,
emoloyed in an arrangement of
"Maple Leaf Rag" seems rath-
er pointless and gimmicky, how-
ever. Rossini's "Semiramide
Overture" is played without
much nuance; surely if an entire
string section can manage rhy-
thmic .refinements, a mere 16
pianists ought to be able to.
Pianists, unfortunately, are not
accustomed to playing in groups
under a baton, which may be one
reason why a steady pulse is
favored in these works instead
of allowing more rhythmic flux.
Sousa's "Stars and Stripes For-
ever" sounds simply silly, and
See MUSICAL, Page 6
NEW AT
B RBO'FS
NO COVER CHARGE
OLD TIME MOVIES
MON. ONE WEEK
& Buster Keaton
TUES. MASQUERADOR
starts Charlie Chaplin
at 8:30
AND MANY MORE
114 E. WASHINGTON
BEER, WINE & COCKTAILS

By ALVIN CHARLES KATZ
Yesterday's enthusiastic ma-
tinee crowd was treated to a su-
premely entertaining display of
theatrical professionalism as Ap-
plause opened a four-show run
at the Power Center. The show
is the latest offering in the Pro-
fessional Theatre Program ser-
ies.
Applause is a musical adapta-.
tion of the 1950 film All About
Eve, nicely rewritten for t h e
stage by Betty Comden and
Adolph Green, with intelligent
music and lyrics by Charles
Strouse and Lee Adams, and
outstanding direction and chor-
eography by Ron Field.
The plot deals with a cun-
ning actress named Eve Har-

rington, who connives to win the
confidences of an aging b o x
office star, Margo Channing. Eve
slowly ascends to achieve Mar-
go's coveted stardom through
whoring and manipulating, leav-
ing Margo to salvage what is
really important, her lover, her
personal life, and arealization
that in time age must yield to
youth.
The PTP production is excel-
lent - a tight package of vigjr
and vitality that never gives the
viewer a chance to reflect on
what few weaknesses the show
has. The play moves along at a
nice pace, never dwelling uncom-
fortably on particular scenes or
musical numbers. The production
numbers are beautifully staged,

particularly the title song, "Ap-
plause," which joyfully sums up
the whys of being in the theatre.
The production features a variety
of attractive sets, which a r e
changed so subtly and precisely
that they do not detract at all
from the continuity of the show,
a rare theatrical feat.
The entire cast, led by Pa-
trice Munsel, delivered polished
performances and demonstrated
fine ensemble. Virgil Curry hand-
led the awkward role of Margo's
lover deftly; Diane McAfee was
wonderfully feline and bitchy ay
the crafty Eve. I particularly en-
joyed Scott David, who gave
an animated but tastefully re-

strained performance as Margo's
gay hairdresser, and little Pia
Zadora, a veritable bundle of
energy who is the featured per-
former in the song "Applause."
In the lead role of Margo
Channing, Patrice Munsel spark-
led. Despite some rather disturb-
ing formula mugging on many of
her lines, Ms. Munsel brought the
role to life, striking a nice bal-
ance of warmth and bitchiness in
her carefully developed portray-
al. A former opera star, it was
clear that singing was her forte.
Displaying marvelous vocal con-
trol, Ms. Munsel performed both
brassy and introspective songs
with equal brilliance, combining

style and virtuosity to perfection.
As a play, Applause is a little
weak. The script carefully devel-
ops the weaponry for a devastat-
ing attack on the artificiality of
Broadway's values, only to equi-
vocate later, implying that all
the bad faith and malice portray-
ed is inevitable, and somehow
even alright.
Ms. Munsel and company are
undaunted by the script's weak-
ness, and sell the show with such
vibrance and enthusiasm t h a t
they leave little doubt as to their
professionalism and theatrical
skill. For sheer entertainment,
Applause is the best thing I have
seen in Ann Arbor for some time.

Applause at Power

COMING!!
TUESDAY & THURSDAY

0 00

rsupremely entertaining'

... this week in preview
William Albright presents An Evening of Ragtime, Harlem Stride,
and Boogie-Woogie Piano at 8 in the First Unitarian Church; a classi-
cal string quartet performs at the Bslind Pig at 8:30; the Aeolian Cham-
ber Players give a Chamber Music Workshop in the Cady Music Rm.
in Sterns Bldg. at 1; the Navaho Theater Ensemble performs a crea-
tion myth with English translation in the Main Dining Rm., Mary
Markley at 7:30; the March Art Fair at Union Ballroom from 12-6;
the Professional Theatre Program presents Applause at 3 and 8 at
Power Center; the Folklore Society presents a get-together from 2
to 5 at Friends Center - bring instruments.
Professor Ward Bissel lectures on Caravaggio and the Spanish
Baroque Masters at 8 in Rm. 4310 of M.L.B.
The Topeng Dance Theater of Bali performs at 8:30 in Rackham
Aud.; the New World, Film Co-op presents Little Big Man at 7:15
and 9:30 in MLB Aud. 3; the University of Michigan Arts Chorale and
Instrumental Ensemble performs Turn Through Time at Hill Aud. at
8; Professor Donald Grout lectures on Theory and Practice in Music
Historiography at 4 in the School of Music Recital Hall.
Wedhe~da~
Iosif Brodsky reads poetry at 1 in Borders Book Shop; the Museum
of Art displays selections from the Papo Collection of New Guinea at
7:30; the University Concert Band and jazz trumpet soloist Lou Smith
play at Hill at 8; U Players perform The Architect and the Emperor
of Assyria by Fernando Arrabel in Frieze Building Arena, runs thru
Saturday.
The New World Film Co-op presents Little Big Man at 7:15 and
9:30 in Aud. 3 of MLB; Walter Clark reads his poetry at 7:30 in the
Pyramid Gallery; The Union Gallery presents The American Dream
by Edward Albee at 8.
The Union Gallery presents The American Dream by Edward
Albee at 8; Aly Bain and the Boys of the Lough perform at the Ark
at 8:30.
, atc~a9
The National Ballet present Sleeping Beauty Ballet at Power
Center at 8; the Union Gallery presents The American Dream by
Edward Albee at 8; Aly Bain and the Boys of the Lough perform at
the Ark at 8:30; Bette Midler appears in concert at Hill Aud.

Daily Photo by KAREN KASMAUSKI
Raepertoire of old and new
The Aeolian Chamber Players from New York, now in its 12th year, performed at Rackham last
night. See review in Tuesday's Daily.

DUSTIN HOIT
"LITTLE BIG Mm"
Panavisime'Technicolo GP °:

Modern Languages Building
Auditorium 3
(E. Washington at Thayer,
Ann Arbor)

7:15 & 9:30 P.M.
$1.25
New World Film Co-op

A KATHARINE HEPBURN WEEKEND
TONIGHT. -ae
LITTL....
With John Bennett, Fiancis Dee,
Paul Lukas, Spring Byington
Directed by GEORGE CUKOR
A word about
Little Women
It has so long been the custom
to refer to Louisa M. Alcott's mas-
terpiece as a classic expression off
a certain kind of American senti-
mentalism that one risks all sorts
of charges in declaring that GeorgeY
Cukor's screen version of it;
offers a considerable amount of ' . s?
interest and enjoyment. The in
terest may only be oblique; that
is, the excellence of the produc-
tion may force us to inquire why
it is so excellent . . . It will have
to be enough to mention Miss
Hepburn's acting. Already Miss
Hepburn's personality has come in
for a great deal of analytical dis- . ~~
cussion: its vividness, sharpness of
accent, and newness of type for
the screen have all been properly
emphasized. But the impression
gains that what is most essential
about this young actress is not so
much any quality of personality
as it is an element of mind-a
kind of quick contemporary in-
telligence which reaches out with k
immediate effect to a correspond-
ing intelligence in large sections
of her audience. Such an intel-
lectual sort of appeal is not com-
mon on the screen; Chaplin has

tonight
6:00 2 60 Minutes
4 News
9 1 Dream of Jeannie
50 Star Trek
56 Movie
"Sawdust and Tinsel." (1953)
6:30 4 NBC News
9 Beverly Hillbillies
7:00 2 TV 2 Reports
4 George Pierrot
7 To Be Announced
9 Tom Jones
7:30 4 World of Disney
7 Police Surgeon
5:00 2 M*A*S*H
7 FBI
9 Billy Graham Crusade
50 Mancini Generation
56 An American Family
8:30 2 Mannix
4 Columbo
50 Johnny Mann's Stand Up and
Cheer
9:00 7 Tony Awards
9 Purple Playhouse
'Dracula"
56 Masterpiece Theatre
50 To Be Announced
9:30 2 Barnaby Jones
50 Detroit Show
10:00 4 Escape
9 Weekend
56 Firing Line
50 Lou Gordon
10:30 2 Evil Touch
4 Profiles in Black

11:00 2 4 7 News
9 CBC News
11:15 9 Nation's Business'
11:20 9 Religious Scope
11:30 2 Movie
"Kenner." (1969)
4 Big Valley
7 ABC News
9 Movie
"The Bofors Gun." (English
1968)
50 For My People
11:45 7 Movie
"Love Hate Love" (1971)
12:30 4 News
1:30 2 Wagon Train
1:45 7 News
3:00 2 News
MONDAY
6:00 2 4 7 News
9 Courtship of Eddie's Father
50 Flintstones
56 Operation Second Chance
6:30 2 CBS News
4 NBC News
7 ABC News
9 1 Dream of Jeannie
50 Gilligan's Island
56 360 Degrees
7:00 2 Truth or Consequences
4 News
.7 To Tell the Truth
9 Beverly Hillbillies
-50 I Love Lucy
56 Archdiocesan Report
7:30 2 What's My Line?
4 Mouse Factory
7 Let's Make a Deal
9 Wacky World of Jonathan
Winters
50 Hogan's Heroes
56 Great Decisions '73
8:00 2 Gunsmoke
4 Rowan and Martin's Laugh-in
7 Rookies
9 News
56 Dance Theatre of Harlem
50 Dragnet
8:30 9 Tennessee Williams' South

50 Merv Griffin
9:00 2 TV 2 Reports
4 NCAA Basketball
7 Movie
"Gunn" (1967)
56 Mandolinist: Frank Wakefield
9:30 2 Hotel Ninety
56 Book Beat
10:00 9 Nature of Things
50 Perry Mason
56 Speaking Freely
11:00 2 4 7 News
9 CBC News
50 One Step Beyond
11:20 9 News
11:30 2 Movie
"Reflections in a Golden
Eye" (1967)
4 Johnny Carson
7 A Prowler in the Heart
50 Charishaetaoin
50 Movie
"The Letter" (1940)
19:00 9 Movie
"Games" (1967)
1:00 4 7 News
1:30 2 Movie
"Rationing" (1944)
3:00 2 TV High School
3:30 2 News
wcbn
89.5 fm
SUNDAY
9 Classical
12 Broadway
2 Jazz special: The History of
Charlie Parker
11 Progressive Rock
MONDAY
9 The Morning After show
12 Progressive Rock
4 Folk
7 New Releases
8 Blues
11 Progressive Rock
cable tv
channel 3
MONDAY

U

JOHN WFIHNE
FNN-FlIBRET
ROD TBNLOH
THE TRFIIN
w ROB BERS
s Are Bargain Days! OPEN 12:45
75c 1 -5 PM Wed. Shows at 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 PM
SOON: PAUL NEWMAN in:
"THE LIFE & TIMES OF JUDGE ROY BEAN"

w

Wednesday
Adults only7

ATLANTIC AIRBUS
5 Canadian Pacific Airlines DC-8 Jets Weekly
MAY-OCTOBER
From Toronto (International)
To:
LONDON.........from $187
GLASGOW ........ from $172
AMSTERDAM ........ from $195
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Compare these Atlantic Airbus advantages:
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* low cost optional cancellation and missed flight

featured in
this month's
Playboy.
See it while
you ca n.
O O'i
z
ee
plus ALL ABOUT SEX!
cifle 482.3300
a rt-FEE L16KTi
P
NA'110

3:30'
4:00
4:30I
5:001
5:30
6:00
6:30
7:00

Pixanne
Today's Woman
Something Else (rock)
Stratosphere Playhouse
Local News/Town Crier
Black Vibrations
NCAA Super Sports
Community Dialogue

Have a flair for
artistic writing?
If you are interest-
ed in revieing
poetry, and music,
drama, dance, film,
or writing feature
stories a b o u t the
arts: Contact Arta
Editor, c/o The
Michigan Daily.

71

MUSKET '73

West

Side

Story

I APRIL 5--8I

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