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March 22, 1973 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-03-22

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Thursday, March 22, 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven,

Thurday Mach 2, 173 HE ICHGAN AIL Pa e evI

"LEARN FROM A PRO"
Free Instructions
Pocket Billiards
Thurs. 7 p.m.-9 p.m.
MICHIGAN UNION
Do You REALLY Want To Go To
MEDICAL
DENTAL -
VETERINARY
SCHOOL "
Let us help you gain admission
PROFESSIONAL SCHOOL
PLACEMENT SERVICE
29636 Pickford
livonia, Mich. 48152

AUDITIONS
ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATRE
THE MOST HAPPY FELLA
MASS MEETING, 7:30, MARCH 21
All persons interested should attend
Auditions: 7:30 Mar. 23; 2:00 p.m. Mar. 24
Bring music and dress to dance
STUDIO ROOM, MICHIGAN LEAGUE
ATTENTION
BRACELET WEARERS
REPLACE YOUR SYMBOLIC BRACELET WITH A
WORLD PEACE BRACELET
The words that mean so much to us WORLD PEACE
inscribed on a brushed brass or chrome plated
bracelet.
Send your name and address with a check or money order
for $2.50 to:

Sweeping reforms
proposed by students

By DEBORAH GOOD
The Senate Advocate School
Board of the Ann Arbor Schools
proposed some sweeping reforms
on the issue of graduation re-
qulirements at a regular session
of the Board of Education last
night.
The eight point proposal re-
commended the number of units
of English required be cut from
four to three units, that all cred-
ited courses taken in grades 9-12
should be counted toward gradu-
ation and that the students who
complete the 18 units required
for graduation before the class
graduation date must be given
their diplomas at that time.
The students recommend an
optional pass/fail grading sys-
tem with the stipulation that stu-
dents are advised of the sys-
tem's effect on college admis-
sions.
In addition, the students pro-
posed that the physical education

requirements be dropped on the
grounds that specialized interests
like music and art are not re-
quired and any requirements
hamper the students'rstudies in
the fields that do interest them.
As student Maureen Michael said
simply, "People have to learn on
their own."
Board of Education members
Carrington and Warner express-
ed support for some of the re-
commendations a n d outgoing
Superintendent McPherson sug-
gested that a committee with an
equal number of students, par-
ents and factulay work out a fin-
al proposal.
Maureen Michael asked that a
time limit be set for the commit-
tee's final draft and explained
that, "some ,of us are kind of
hanging on this proposal." War-
ner suggested that someone well-
versed in college admssion re-
q'iirements be on the committee.
The, committee is to be headed
by school administrator Mays.

"NEVER GIVE A INCH"
was the motto
of the Stampers of Oregon...
and live it they didI
kLCARflICK
- v'
Based on the Novel by
KEN KESEY
TONIGHT ONLY
Modern Languages Bldg. Aud. 3
(E. Washington at Thayer)
7:30 & 9:30 P.M. $1.25
NEW WORLD FILM CO-OP
Read Daily
Classifieds

PEACE CREATIONS, INC.
BLOOMFIELD HILLS, MICH. 48013

P.O. BOX 97

PLEASE SPECIFY TYPE OF BRACELET

I

U
Ann Arbor Civic Ballet
PRESENTS
ASpring Concert
AT THE
Power Centerk
FRIDAY, MARCH 23 at 8:00 p.m.
DETROIT CITY BALLET
GUEST COMPANY
Six Outstanding Ballets
ADULTS-$3.00 CHILDREN-$1.00
Tickets on Sale at Stanger's,
Sylvia Studio and Chelsea Flower,
At Power Box Office March 22,
Ito 9 p.m. and March 23, 1 to 8 p.m.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN'

THURSDAY, MARCH 22
DAY CALENDAR
Maternal & Child Health Film: "All
My Babies," 1170 SPH II. noon.
Music School: Piano student recital,
SM Recital Hall, 12:30 pm.
Future Worlds Lecture Series: A. Re
bin, lawyer, "The Birthdate Phenome-
non. Pt. I," Aud. 3, MLB, 3 pm.
MHRI, Psychiatry: P. Carlton, Rut-
gers, "Studies of the Physiological
Bases of Memory," 1057 MHRI, 3:45 pm.
Geology & Mineralogy: I. Ramberg,
U of Oslo, "Geology & Geophysics of
the Oslo Graben & Assoc. Igneous Rock
Suites," 1512 CC Little. 4 pm.
Ctr. Early Childhood Dev.-Educ: D.
Weikart, "Whatever Happens to Pre-
school Graduates?" Aud. B, Angell, 4
pm.
Prog. in Engr. for Public Systems: P.
Szanton, Rand Corp., "Engineers &
Social Change." 229 W. Eng.s 4 pm.
Psychology: W. Garner, Yale, "The

Perception of Temporal Patterns."
Rackham Amph., 4 pm.
Statistics: A. Bharucha-Reid, WSU,
"A Class of P.D.E. Driven by Stochastic
Point Process," 429 Mason, 4 pm.
Extension Serv.-English: Poetry read-
ing, R. Hayden, Aud. 4, MLB, 4:10 pm.
Hist. of Art: J. Sloane, U of N. C.,
"Impressionists as Bourgeois," Aud. A,
Angell. 4:10 pm.
Near East. Lang. & Lit.: N. Glatzer,
Brandeis U. "The Prophet Jeremiah &
the Religion of the Spirit." 170 P-A
Bldg.. 4:10 pm.
Russian & E. European Ctr.-Poli.
Sci.-W. Europ. Ctr.: R. Remington.
MIT, "European Security Conference,"
E. Conf. Rm., Rackham, 4:10 pm.
Near East. Lang. & Lit.: K. Estreicher
U of Cracow, "Bartolomeo Berrecci &
the Sigismund Chapel in Cracow," 200
Lane Hall, 4:10 pin.
Int'l Night : Italian food, League
cafgteria, 5 pm.

Daily Photo by KEN FINK
Happy birthday Johann
Susan Wait, foreground and Linda Bradham get in a bit of Ba^h nost'lgia yesterday on the occasion of
the great master's birthday. Had he lived, Bach wo iid have been 288 years old yesterday.
21 HOURS CAPTIVITY:
Inmatesfeeguards;
2-0 demands acede

MUSIC LESSONS
SIGN UP NO WFOR CLASS GUITAR LESSONS.
JUST $12.00 FOR A SIX-WEEK COURSE. Rentals
available.
Also private lessons on guitar, flute, recorder, banjo,
piano, and moog. CALL
Ann Arbor MusicMart
769-4980 9:30-9:00
336 South State Street

I

MOUNDSVILLE, W. Va. (P -
Five guards held captive for 24
hours were released by West Vir-
ginia Penitentiary inmates yester-
day after authorities agreed to
most of the prisoners' demands.
Gov. Arch Moore walked from
the gray, fortress-like institution
with the guards shortly before noon
and said agreement to 20 of 22 de-
mands had ended the uprising in
which one prisoner was fatally
stabbed and two others wounded.
The governor 'identified the dead
inmate as Willy Hale of Charles-
ton. When asked how Hale died,
Moore said, "I can't respond to
that. It was very brutal."
The two other prisoners, who ap-
parently were stabbed in a scuffle
Tuesday with other fellow inmates,
were listed in guarded condition at
a local hospital.
Soon after the release, Norman
Yost, an aide to Moore, said a
"minor disturbance" b e t w e e n
black and white inmates started as
officials were removing the body
of the slain prisoner. The trouble
ended quickly and prisoners re-
turned to their cells under the.
eyes of National Guardsmen and
state policemen.
Associate Warden Robert Gun-
noe said 30 to 35 inmates, many
with homemade knives, were be-
hind the trouble, but added that up
to 200 of the facility's more than
500 inmates had locked themselves!
in the prison's south wing.
The governor, who flew here un-
announced, said authorities agreed
to 13 of the 15 demands presented
by prisoners in yesterday's nego-

tiations. Officials had agreed to
seven initial demands Tuesday.
Moore said there were two de-
mands which "under no circum-
stances could I agree to" but de-
scribed most of them as "only hu-
mane and fair, in some respects."
He said authorities refused to
grant demands for amnesty from
prosecution for those involved in
the trouble and permission for
prisoners to carry more than one
dollar in cash.
Among the demands that offic-
ials agreed to accept was one to
dismantle "the hole," a 10-cell
area in the basement used for
strict disciplinary purposes. The
prisoners also asked for more con-
tact with state officials and news-'

men, permission for those in soli-
tary to attend Sunday church serv-
ices, and clean sheets in the maxi-
mum security area cells.
Inmates interviewed by news-
men described the disturbance as
"spontaneous." One prisoner said,
"We treated the guards like ba-
bies."
Lloy I Miller, one of the released
guards, said they "never were
touched" by their captors.
The prison's director of athletics
said- some inmates helped keep
him from being taken hostage.
"If it hadn't been for the will of
God and a human wall that some
of the inmates fornied to protect
me, I would be one of the host-
ages, too," Chris Hall said.

Scandal charged to
OEO use of funds

inHeading ite
right die ion
Moving straight ahead,
following the times, keeping
up-to-date, seeking the life
that's happening now. That's
you and your friends, always
on the go.
To keep you going
confidently every day, you
need Tampax tampons.
They're the internal sanitary
protection that's part of today,
that frees you to lead
an active life. No
reason to sit idle and ii
let the fun pass you
by. With Tampax tampons,
you're not encumbered by
pins and pads, not held back
by fear of "something
showing."
And they come in three
absorbency-sizes-Regular,
Super and Junior--so you get
the one that's best for you.
With Tampax tampons to rely
an, you're always heading in
the right direction for fun.

(Continued from Page 1)
were belt-tightening and they just
were not productive, but their fail-
ure to attend the rally in Washing-
ton was one of the factors and mayI
have been the final indicator in our
decision:"
One of the fired employes tool'
her case to the Glen Cove, N.Y.
chapter of the NAACP, which asked'
for a full investigation of the dis-
charges.
James Davis, president of the
Glen Cove chapter, said in the let-
ter that the firings of the nine

poverty workers were illegal be-
cause "no OEO employe could be
made or pressured to take part in
lobbying."
The letter, Davis said in a tele-
phone interview, also asked for an
investigation to determine whether
"OEO funds were used to rent the
68 buses that were used to carry
Nassau residents to Washington."
Kearse said the charges are "part
of the continuing strategy, by OEO
Washington to try to justify their
:allous plans of dismantling OEO
to the American public."

original works of graphic art-etchings, lithographs,-
by leading 20th century artists:

p

94

Pablo Picasso

Johnny Friedlaender

Salvador Dali, Alexander Calder
Georges Rouault Victor Vasarely

Marc Chagall'
Joan Miro
and others.

SUNDAY, MARCH 25th at 3:00 P.M.
WEBER'S INN - 3050 Jackson Rd.

I

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Based on the KENKESEY
Novel byKENKE Y
* TONITE ONLY * 7:30
Modern Languages Building, Auditorium !II &
(E. Washington at Thayer, Ann Arbor) 9:30
51.25 NEW WORLD FILM CO-OP P.M
Next Week-"LITTLE BIG MAN"

I

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ATTENTION

EXHIBITION: 1:00-3:00

ADMISSION FREE

First Show of the Year Presented by Meridian Gallery

ANN ARBOR MERCHANTS!!!
There are advertising possibilities in the new

_ __ _ _ . _ _
._ _ _

Michigan Daily

Magazine.

Jacobson's Open Thursday and Friday Until 9:00 P.M.

SALE
Deck Shoes for Miss J
Two pairs for $9
One pair $6
Now through March 31
. .irmportant savings on two
pairs of action shoes by
Uniroyal of rugged canvas
with non-skid soles. In
white or navy, sizes 5-10
medium and 5h-10 n arrow.

f fJ""*
7f

Advertising deadline: Marc 29
Contact Paula for more in formation 764-0554

I

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a,

- _--. .. __ _ _ _ _ -1

WCBN-FM RECORD-BREAKING YOGURT CONTEST

Grand Prize: 50

FREE ALBUMS & Two Cases of YOGURT !

TELL US HOW MANY INDIVIDUAL SERVINGS OF YOGURT WERE PUR-
CHASED BY FOOD SERVICES OF THE FOLLOWING SCHOOLS COMBINED
IN 1972.

The Internal protection more womer trust

BLACKHILL STATE COLLEGE
UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT EL PASO
ANTIOCH COLLEGE
GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY
NEW MEXICO HIGHLANDS COLLEGE

NAME
ADDRESS -
PHONE-......-__-
GUlFSS

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