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January 14, 1973 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1973-01-14

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Sunday,, January 14, 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Sunday, January 14, 1973 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

Most of our patrons agree with
1214, s. university - Free Press critic Susan Stark who
called HAROLD AND MAUDE
I LIUL" "the most easy-to-take comedy of
the year" and who picked it as
Theatre Phone 66846416 one of the year's
,: . 10 best films.
They met at the funeral of a perfect stranger.
From then on, things got perfectly stranger and stranger.
Paramount Pictures Presents
HAROLD and MAUDE
Color by Technicolor A Paramount Picture
]GPjZo EXTRA
"THE DOVE"
A satire on Ingm ar Bergm an films
UMFS presents
i::v.}John
Hartford
and
Blake
IN CONCERT
JAN. 26
... .. 8 P.M.-Power Center
$3.50 reserved tickets
available at Herb David's,
209 S. State.
Subscribe to The Daily
Phone 764-0558

Cosi Fan Tuute:
a lackluster affair

By TONY CECERE
"Cosi Fan Tutte," comic opera
in two acts with music by Wolf-
gang Amadeus Mozart and libretto
by Lorenzo da Ponte with English
version by Ruth and Thomas Mar-
tin. Production by the Canadian
Opera Company with the Canadian
Opera Orchestra, John Fenwick,
Conductor. Directed by Herman
Geiger-Torel with Sets by Georg
Schogi. Costumes by Andrea Grain-
ger. Friday Evening, January 12,
1973 at 8:00 p.m. Power Center for
the Performing Arts, Ann Arbor,
Michigan. The Cast:
Fiordiligi, Helly Jedig; Dorabella,
Nancy Greenwood; Despina, A n n
Cooper; Ferrando, John Arab; Gul-
ielmo, Donald Oddie; Don Alfonso,
Jan Rubes; Servants: Phil Stark,
Steven Thomas.
When the Canadian Opera Com-
pany decided to take "Cosi Fan
Tutte" on tour they had to leave.
something behind. This is under-
standable for economic reasons:
it would be foolhardy to take an
extravaganza production on the
road. However, when the some-
thing left behind turns out to be
large and salient chunks of the
score as well as two trumpets
and the tympani part, the re-
sults can be nothing but dis-
appointing. Admittedly, s o m e
cuts were necessary - you can-
not do one of the later scenes
in act one without a chorus and
a chorus is very expensive. This
does not excuse the omission of
many beautiful and important
sections of the second act, how-
ever. Nor does it excuse the om-
ission of the very important tym-
pani part and the sorrowful
transcribing of the trumpet parts
to the Horns. I have nothing
against Horns mind you - I play
Horn myself. Trumpet parts
were, after all, written for trum-
pets. You cannot play a Chopin
etude with just the right hand,
and you cannot have an orches-
tra without proper instrumenta-
tion.
This was a company that acted
well, much in the style of the
New York City Center 0 p e r a
Company. There were moments
when this forte was a bit over-
done, as in the case of Act One
when Dorabella and Fiordiligi
perched on a seesaw. Somehow
the seesaw did not quite fit the
scene. The costumes of the "Al-
banians" (Ferrando and Gugliel-

mo in disguise) were rather hum-
orous even though they were not
at all Albanian.
_The set design was also rather
humorous in a mock-baroque fa-
shion. But in spite of these non-
sequitirs the humor was delight-
ful. This was a somewhat slap-
stick interpretation of the da-
Ponte roles, very close in spirit
to the original production and its
aims.
Perhaps the acoustics in Pow-
er Center were to blame for the
dampened and somewhat t h i n
sound of the singers. Their dic-
tion was impeccable but their
voices did not reach the back of
the auditorium. The one unpleas-
ant matter in this regard was the
tendency for the duets and tutti
numbers to float away from the
rhythm in the orchestral a z-
companiment, something that is
clearly the fault of Maestro John
Fenwick.
Some of the more pleasant mo-
ments in Friday night's produc-
tion came from the pit. Appar-
ently Maestro Fenwick's atten-
tions were more concentrated on
the orchestra, giving a fine lilt
to the overture and some of the
other lighter sections of the score.
There were some obvious intona-
tion problems in the pit, parti-
cularily in the Horns and Clar-
inets.
Helly Jedig and Nancy Green-
wood were both convincing in the
roles of Dodabella and Fiordiligi,

although Miss Jedig has a ten-
dency to force in the upper re-
gister. These tones occasionally
buried the other voices, which
was most unpleasant. Ann Coop-
er sang Despina with appropriate
sarcasm and virtually captured
the audience with her charm. Her
saucy mannerismsand excellent
vocalising were the zenith of
the production. John Arab and
Donald Oddie also performed
adequately as Ferrando and Gu-
lielmo. Unfortunately, Jan Rubas
was nothing spectacular as Don
Alfonso.
There were moments when, he
operadragged,hespecially in the
second act. This was partially
due to the stage direction, which
suffered from a lack of imagin-i-
tion and conveyed a sense of
routinization by the end of the
opera.
There were times when t h e
singers would lose their sense
of pacing: ariving at a spot on
the stage, Ferrando would ab-
ruptly break into song or at other
times stand and do nothing.
Aside from the missing music,
my profound regret was that
there was nothing extraordinary
about the production. There were
highlights to the show in the act-
ing and the comedy, yet there
was nothing at all superior about
this show. Dr. Herman Geiger-
Torel should be chastised for tak-
ing such a lackluster affair on
the road, not to mention t h e
stage direction or the musical
surgery performed on the Mo-
zart masterpiece. After all, peo-
ple go to the opera not for the
ordinary - they go for the exra-
ordinary. The Canadian O p e r a
Company gave us very little of
that.

Cosi Fan Tutte

The Golden Ring:
Sfine and mellow'

O'Neill and Mary Addiss. Barry
is well known to Ann Arbor aud-
iences and Mary should be. Her
pure soprano was a pleasing addi-
tion to the evening.
With much casual humor, and
the perfect taste in music charac-
teristic of the Golden Ring, they
rounded out the third set, closing
with what they consider 1972's
best folkstyle show, Bob Colt-
man's "The Minstrel Show." The
Golden Ring, like good wine, be-
comes finer and mellower w i t Ih
each passing year.

I

C.ULTURE CALIIAR
FILM - Cinema Guild shows The Maltese Falcon in Arch.
Aud. at 7 and 9:05. Cinema II screens Topper at 7 and
9 in Aud. A.
ART - Today's your last chance to see drawings and photo-
graphs of European architectural monuments by Albert
Kahn at the UM Museum of Art. Also on display is an
exhibition of "Post Conceptual Graphics by Robert Senn-
hauser, visible in the exhibition hall of the College of
Architecture and Design.
WEEKEND BARS AND MUSIC - Bimbo's, Gaslighters (Fri.,
Sat., Sun.) cover; Del Rio, Armando's Jazz Group (Sun.)
no cover; Rubaiyat, Iris Bell Adventure (Fri., Sat., Sun.)
no cover; Pretzel Bell, RFD Boys (Fri., Sat.) cover; Blind
Pig, Brooklyn Bluesbusters (Fri., Sat.) cover, string trio
(Sun.) no cover; Golden Falcon, The Fifth Revelation
(Fri., Sat.) cover; Mackinac Jack's, Lucille Spann and
the Garfield Blues Band (Fri., Sat., Sun.) cover; Mr.
Flood's Party, Diesel Smoke and Dangerous Curves (Fri.,
Sat.) cover; Odyssey, Stone Front (Fri., Sat.) cover;
Bimbo's on the Hill, The Crickets (Fri., Sat.) cover; Ark.
The Golden Ring (Fri., Sat.) admission.
MUSIC - Karen Lundgren sings soprano in the SM Recital
Hall at 4:30. Mardy Medders does the same at 8 in the
SM Recital Hall. Also at 8, Bert Lord can be heard play-
ing organ at Hill.

By LORRE WEIDLICH
The Golden Ring opened Fri-
day night by parading onto the
floor of the Ark to the sound of
George Armstrong's piping. With
George clad in a kilt, followed by
the woman in long, colorful
skirts, and Harry Tuft and Ed
Trickett trailing up the rear, they
made as strong a visual as a
musical impact.
Their first song was the one
for which their loose association
is named, "The Golden Ring,"
and, with guitars and a dulcimer,
they performed several beauti-
fully arranged traditional songs
together before splitting up into
smaller groups for the first
two sets.
The Armstrongs are perman-
ent members of a group known
for its constantly shifting mem-
bership. Gerry -Armstrong is a
beautiful woman with a youth-
ful, gentle face and a voice that
became increasingly more love-
ly as she warmed up during the
evening. Her rendition of "The
Loving of the Game," with Ed
Tricket's sensitive guitar pick-
ing backing her up, showed off
her pure, vibrant voice at its fin-
est.
George joined her on several
songs with excellent results, but
the peak of his performance was
the series of pipe tunes with
which he began the third set. He
intertwined bits of Scottish his-
tory with Scottish music ranging
from battle songs to a dirge, all
well played. Becky and Jenny
Armstrong's voices lack the
strength of their mother's voice,
but they blended into a light,
pleasant sound on their duets,
the most notable oftwhichdwas
"Queen Eleanor's Confession."
Ed Trickett and Harry T u f t
dominated the second set. Ed's
fine guitar work, impeccable
taste in songs, mellow, lyrical
voice are well-known. His and
Harry's a capella version of "The
Greasley Bride," a werewolf
song, held the audience spell-
bound, and everybody sang along

r

to

CEE
SUNDAY: Cary Grant in

nostalgically on Harry's sensi-
tive treatment of his all time fa-
vorite Dylan song, "Don't Think
Twice, It's All Right."
The group came together for
the third set, and in fact invited
two of Ann Arbor's resident folk-
singers to join them, Barry

1

ARTS

TOPPER 1931
AUD A ANGELL HALL

Norman
McLeod
seven and nine

toni ght
6:00 2 60 Minutes
7 Movie
"Mozambique" (65)
9 UFO
50 Star Trek
56 Movie
"Jules and Jim"
6:30 4 Super Bowl Post-Game
7:00 2 TV 2 Reports
4 George Pierrot-Travel
9 Engelbert Humperdinck
50 Lawwrence Welk
7:30 4 World of Disney
8:00 2 M*A*S*H
7 FBI
9 Churchill the Man
50 Mancini Generation
56 An American Family
8:30 2 Mannix
4 McMillan and Wife
50 Johnny Mann's Stand Up
and Cheer
9:00 7 Movie
"Plaza Suite" (71)
9 Sunday at Nine
56 Masterpiece Theatre
50Golddiggers
9:30 2 Robert Young and the Family
50 Detroit Show
10:00.4 Night Gallery
9 Weekend

ONE DOLLAR
New Winter Schedules at all shows

Tickets on sale at 6 p.m.

i -q

GALERIE JA
OPENI N
JAN. 13th & 14th
2 ETCHERS
G. BRI LLANT
J. DEBUTLER

CQUES
G
2-6 P.M.
2208 Packard
(at Rosewood)
Phone 769-6787
AMPLE PARKING

56 Firing Line
50 Lou Gordon
10:30 2 Evil Touch
4 Profiles in Black
11:00 2 4 9 News
11:15 7 News
9 Religious Scope
11:30 2 Movie
4 Big Valley
9 Movie
"Cape Fear" (62)
50 For My People
11:45 7 ABC News
12:00 7 Movie
"Mrs. Gibbons' Boys" (En-
glish; 1962)
5OFree at Last
12:30 4 News
1:30 2 Movie
"The Fireball" (1950)
2:00 7 News
3:00 2 News
MONDAY
6:00 2 4 7 News
9 Courtship of Eddie's Father
50 Flintstones
56 To Be Announced
6:30 2 CBS News
4 NBC News
7 ABC News
9 I Dream of Jeannie
50 Gilligan's Island
56 360 Degrees
7:00 2 Truth or Consequences
4 News
7 To Tell the Truth
9 Beverly Hillbillies
50 I Love Lucy
7:30 What's My Line?
4 Mouse Factory
7 Let's Make a Deal
9 Wacky World of Jonathan
Winters
50 Hogan's Heroes
56 The Mild Bunch
8:00 2 Gunsmoke
4 Rowan and Martin's Laugh-in
7 Rookies
9 Good Life
56 Full Circle
50 Dragnet
8:30 9 David Frost Revue
50 Merv Griffin
9:00 2 Here's Lucy
4 Movie
7 Movie
"A Gunfight
9 News
9:30 2 State o f the City Address
9 This is the Law
56 Book Beat
10:00 9 Nature of Things
50 Perry Mason
56 Speaking Freely
10:30 9 Man Alive
11:00 2 4 7 News
9 CBC News
50 One Step Beyond
11:20 9 News
11:30 2 Movie
"The Split" (68)
4 Johnny Carson
7 Movie
"An Echo of Theresa"
50 Movie
"They Died with Their Boots
On" (41)
12:00 9 Movie
"Fahrenheit 451" (English;
1966)
1:00"4 7 News
1:15 2 Movie
"Nob Hill" (45)
2:45 2 News

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SUNDAY, 5,7, 9:15 - MON., TUES., 7 and 9:15
76-1-97013
STARTS WEDNESDAY-Two films by Ken Russell,
Director of "Women in Love" and "The Devils."

SEAN CONNERY Is JAMES BOND in
FROM RUSSIA, WITH LOVE
One of the very best and most representative of the Bond series
TUESDAY EVENING-January 16th-7 & 9 p.m.
COMING WEDNESDAY-January 17th-200 MOTELS-Frank Zappa
COMING THURSDAY-January 18th-THE FRENCH CONNECTION

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