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March 21, 1973 - Image 10

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-03-21

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Page Ten

THE !MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, March 2.1, 1973,

Page Ten THE MICHIGAN DAiLY Wednesday, March 21, 1 973~

Possibility of Stephenson-led GOP city
control becomes issue in coming election

(Continued from Page 1)
"It's a very difficult race,
comments Susan Steigerwalt,
HRP party co-ordinator. "But
there is a distinct possibility
that we can win. We've been get-
ting no negative responses in our
canvassing."
Merchants
respond to
bottle law
(Continued from Page 1)
sales manager of Coca Cola, says
that "As a business we'd prefer
not to have a ban on packaging,"
he hastily adds, "we intend to be a
good citizen and live up to the
spirit of the law."
However, during City Council's
Monday night meeting, where the
ordinance passed 8-3, local mer-
chants' responses were not so fa-
vorable.
"The measure can only be im-
practical and very costly," claimed
one businessman.
"The general reaction expect-
ed from the industry," Harris re-
ports, "is a greatly reduced avail-
ability in Ann Arbor of beer and
pop in one-way containers."
Also, the measure will probably
eliminate Canada Dry and Faygo
brand products from city stores
because they are not produced in
returnable containers and there-
fore are not economically feasibleI
in the city anymore.
However, the Detroit - based
Faygo Beverage Inc. declines com-
ment "at this time," saying the
ordinance was different than any
other legislation encountered by
them before.
Brands of foreign beer may also
drop out of the picture in the city
since they are only sold in one-
way containers.
"Certainly some brands will dis-
appear. I don't find that desirable.
But it's difficult to design an effec-
tive measure without that hap-
pening," Harris comments.
Merchants claim that many city
residents will go outside Ann Ar-
bor to purchase these products,
and that the loss in revenue will
be severe.
"Diversion of sales to outlying
areas is a real problem," Harris
comments, "but we're trying to
get the townships to pass similar
laws."
The measure, effective June 1,I
is designed to reduce litter due to1
"the accumulation of discarded
beverage containers in public
areas."
All local retailers will be re-
quired to collect a deposit on all
the beverage containers they sell,
and redeem all containers pre-
sented to them if they are the
same brandtand type the store
stocks.
All vending machines within the
city must also conform to the new
ordinance.

To counter the spoiler image,
Kaimowitz has throughout her
campaign insisted that Mogdis is
the weakest of the three candi-
dates - hence the spoiler. While
the Kaimowitz candidacy is con-
sidered a strong one, capable of
drawing significant liberal sup-
port, it is unclear whether she
can make this point stick.
In addition to these arguments,
HRP leaders contend that the
spectre of a Republican, city gov-
ernment has been greatly exag-
gerated.
"I don't think having a Dem-
ocratic or Republican majority
makes that much differenceto
the needs of the people of Ann
Arbor," says HRP councilman
Jerry De Grieck.
De Grieck concedes that a
Republican council might repeal
ordinances dealing with -mari-
juana and sex-preference, but as
a result of the revenue sharing
deal currently being worked out,
De Grieck feels that most soc-
ial welfare programs would re-
mainintact.
"I'm tired of having HRP

called a spoiler party," he adds,
"I think people are intelligent
enough to know how to vote. Peo-
ple should vote for us on our
politics and what we have
done."
De Grieck further maintains
that a Republican - dominated
council would be a short-term
proposition.
Democratic Mayor Robert Har-
ris views the situation in a dif-
ferent light.
"The same dynamics that
could produce a Republican ma-
jority this year could produce it
endlessly," says Harris. "It is
not just a question of personal
ties, it is a question of struc-
ture."
As to the tangible effects of a
Republican - controlled council,
Harris lists the city attorney's
office as one place where the
Republican ax is likely to come
down hard. Replacing the city
clerk, the police chief and the
city administrator, are other pow-
ers, Harris feels the Republi-
cans could exercise.
In the field of civil liberties,

Harris forsees further changes.
"Their road to reducing crime
is to get tough," the mayor
warns.
On another point, sure to touch
a raw nerve among HRP lead-
ers, Mayor Harris adds, "On the
whole question of dealing with
people of a different lifestyle
there will be a hard line."
Speculating on a possible Ste-
phenson mayorship with a Re-
publican council minority, an-
other conceivable scenario, Ted
Beals, a leading Democrat says,
"What we would see is a freeze
on new legislation. Stephenson
would block it with his veto."
It presently takes a two-thirds
vote to override a mayoral veto.
Ironically the person least in-
volved in this controversy is
James Stephenson, the man
whose potential strength touched
it off. He is just sitting back,
watching the other two parties
argue about him.
And while he won't admit it, he
must be flattered by the whole
thing. After all, he's probably
never been a spectre before.

Gray evades
questons
(Continued from Page 1)
Gray's refusal to discuss further
the FBI's investigation of the case
came as the committee entered its
third week into hearings on his
nomination.
Gray returned to the stand today
amid speculation that the White
House, displeased with his pre-
vious disclosures about the agency's
investigation of the bugging, was
prepared to withdraw his nomina-
tian or was not supporting it as
strongly as it did originally.

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