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March 21, 1973 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-03-21

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, March 1, 1973

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, March 21, 1973

One-man
one-vote
modified
WASHINGTON 03 - The Su-
preme Court yesterday agreed to
permit voting by property owners
only in such governmentdunitstas
watershed districts, holding that
the one-man one-vote principle
does not apply in such cases.
Two 6 - 3 decisions approved bal-
lot restrictions of districts in Cali-
fornia and Wyoming where votes
were given only to landholders, in-
cluding corporations, with t h e
votes weighted according to the
size of the holding.
First declaring that the districts
had limited purpose and did not
exercise "normal governmetal au-
thority," the majority said a state
"could rationally conclude that
landowners are primarily burden-
ed and benefited by the establish-
ment and operation of watershed
districts and that it may condition
the vote accordingly."
Justice William Douglas dissent-
ed sharply, saying the majority did!
violence not only to the Constitu-
tion but the environment as well.
Writing for the majority in the
California case, Justice W i I i a m
Rehnquist said the Tulare L a k e
Basin Water District falls into ex-
ceptions in the court's previous rul-
ing extending the vote in popular
elections.
The restrictions had been attack-
ed by small landowners, and non-
land owning residents as unconsti-
tutional.
"Nothing the the equal protec-
tion clause of the Constitution pre-_
cludes California from limiting the
voting for directors of the district
by totally excluding those who
merely reside within the district,"
said Rehnquist.
Noting that a function of the dis-
trict was flood control, Douglas
said all should vote equally, be
they landowners or residents.
"LEARN FROM A PRO"
Free Instructions
Pocket Billiards
Thurs. 7 p.m.-9 p.m.
MICHIGAN UNION
The National Caucus
of
Labor Committees
and
The Committee
to Rebuild NWRO
present
DAPHNE POUNDS
on
Building
the
National
Unemployed
and
Welfare Rights
Organization

Thursday, Mar. 22
7:30 p.m.
3540 SAB

Panama
PANAMA CITY, Panama (Reuter)-The United
States yesterday said it was ready to conclude
a new treaty with Panama over the future of
the Panama Canal, and that it supports Pana-
ma's "just aspirations."
"Those who attack the 1903 treaty are at-
tacking a phantom foe," U. S. Ambassador John
Scali told the Security Council meeting in Pana-
ma City.
Scali said the 70 year-old agreement granting
the U. S. perpetual rights over the 500 square
mile Canal Zone had twice before been "revised
significantly to Panama's advantage."
"The U. S. was ready to change it again, on
the basis of friendly negotiations," he said.
"The United States is ready to conclude a
new treaty promptly," Ambassador Scali told
the 15-nation body, which has concentrated its
attention on the Canal dispute during the week-
long session here due to end Wednesday.
"At the same time, we believe it necessary
that the United States continue to be responsi-
ble for the operation and defense of the Canal

treaty seen,
for an additional, specified period of time."
"I would like to make it clear that the United
States, no less than others who have spoken at
this table, supports Panama's just aspirations."
He said U. S. negotiators had already recog-
nized that the 1903 treaty should be replaced by
"a new, modern treaty," that any new Canal
treaty should be of fixed duration "rejecting the
concept of perpetuity" and that "Panama should
have returned to it a substantial territory now
part of the Canal Zone, with arrangement for
use of other areas."
These areas would be "the minimum required
for United States operations and defense of the
Canal, and would be integrated into the legal,
economic, social and cultural life of Panama, on
a timetable to be agreed on.
Scali said it had also been recognized that
"Panama should exercise its jurisdiction in the
Canal area pursuant to a mutually agreed table."
Finally, it had been agreed that Panama should
receive "substantially increased annual pay-
ments for the use of its territory relating to the
Canal."

TONY BOYLE, former United
Mine Workers President, con-
firmed yesterday that he ap-
proved the transfer of $20,000 in
UAW funds to a lesser union of-
ficial. However, he denied un-
der oath that the money was
used to finance the slaying of
UMW funds to a lessor union of-
ski. Boyle testified in defense of
William Prater, who is accused
of hiring the killers of Yablon-
ski in December 1969.

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Phenomenology Group
PRESENTS
WRITER
JOCK HENDERSON
SPEAKING ON
"Phenomenology & Literature"
March 21, 1973, Wednesday
in the
MICHIGAN UNION FACULTY
CLUB LOUNGE
7:30 p.m.

CVM
ROCK"
ynthia Peabody was far and away the
brightest girl at the university. Added
to her many triumphs were Home-
coming Queen, captain of the debate team and
honorary right tackle of the varsity football squad.
The actual right tackle was a happy-go-lucky 280
pounder named Mad Dog Linguini. Mad Dog was
overjoyed about sharing his position with Cynthia.
He loved the way she looked. He even loved the
way she debated. Well, you know how impulsive
football players are. Mad dog asked Cynthia out
... to a scrimmage. When she turned him down
he asked her to marry him. Taken by surprise
Cynthia consented on the condition that Mad Dog
become first in his class. He studied relentlessly,
day and night and between plays.
Confident in his ability to suc-
ceed, Mad Dog acquired a
Vanity Fair diamond ring
catalog. The entire football
S.t team helped him select a most
exquisite diamond engagement
ring for Cynthia. (And no
football-shaped diamond like
you're thinking.) Mad Dog
managed to afford the ring on
* his scholarship money because
" Vanity Fair diamonds are 50%
less than any comparable dia-
mond he could have purchased
elsewhere. Mad Dog was also
appreciative of Vanity Fair's money-back guar-
antee in 30 days if he wasn't fully satisfied.
Well, Mad Dog never quite made it to number one
in the class, but Cynthia, nevertheless, was en-
thralled by his spunk and the beautiful Vanity
Fair diamond engagement ring he gave her. They
were married by Mad Dog's coach in a spectacular
half-time ceremony and spent the rest of the game
in the locker room.
If you'd like something
to reaid in the locker rooms
or the library send for
your own personal copy of,<t
the Vanity Fair Diamond
catalog.
Use the coupon below.
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Importers & Manufacturers since 1921
55 East Washington St.,Chicago, Illinois 60602
Name _--
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City State Zip
School

"ALASKA"
Job opportun:ties for laborers,
$3G0-$500 p:r week; t r u c k
drivers. $ 00-$F00 per week;
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more. Send for information en-
closenq a long stamped, return
envelope plus $1.00 to Alaskan
Opportunities, Box 3206, Ogden,
Utah 84403.
Why Aren't
You A
Good Talker?
A noted publisher in Chicago
reports a simple technique of
everyday conversation which
can pay you real dividends in
social and business advancement
and works like magic to give
you poise, self-confidence and
greater popularity.
According to, this publisher,
many people do not realize how
much they could influence others
simply by what they say and
how they say it. Whether in
business, at social functions, or
even in casual converations with
new acquaintances thtrr are
ways to make a good impression
every time you talk.
To acquaint the readers of
this paper with the easy-to-
follow rules for developing skill
in everyday conversation, the
publishers have printed full de-
tails of their interesting self-
training method in a new book-
let, "Adventures in Conversa-
tion," which will be mailed free
to anyone who requests it. No
obligation. Send your name. ad-
dress, and zip code to C(oni't
sation, 5,55 E. Lange St., Dept.
940-40. Mundelein. lll. 6006W A
postcard wil oo.

her name is Be.......
0 a s
-n,
And for more than a decade, she has been working
bard to change the way we live-in the Civil Rights
Movement, as a ghetto high school teacher in
Brooklyn, and as a worker at Ozone House.
"Working with the young, people at Ozone House has taught
me how an unresponsive city administration can destroy
dreams and embitter lives.'
"I've learned that the city---whether run by Democrats or
Republicans-responds to developers, business groups and
others with big money."
Be Kaimowitz is running for mayor because she
wants city government to begin responding to the
people who've been left out-blacks, students,
women, neighborhood groups, workers, poor people.
Benita Kaimowitz
for MAYOR
Human Rights Party
Paid Pol Ad, People for Kaimowitz

LS&A College lecture
Professor Arthur Chickering
Vice-President for Academic Affairs
Empire State College
"Empire State College After One Year-
Problems and Prospects"
2:00 PM.
FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 1973I

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Room 2553

LS&A Building

EVERYONE WELCOME

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For a trial size package of Kotex
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mail this order form with 254 in coin
to cover mailing and handling to:
Kotex tampons
Box 551 CN1
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Name
Address
City
State.--- -zip
Allow 4 weeks for dehvery.
Otter expires December 31, 1973.
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