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March 18, 1973 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-03-18

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
ORIGIN DISPUTED

Reichstag fire

AP Photo
The snows of St. Patrick's Day did not dampen the festivites for Muskegon's oldest Irishman, Louis
Paterick Roy who marked his 106th birthday. Roy exchanged quips with his French friend, Henry
Guillot, who was 104 on Friday. Both reside at Knollview Nursing Home in Muskegon.
Joggers found round-the-world

WASHINGTON (Reuter) - They cided the way to good health is to
are to be found in Manhattan, run- run and run and run.
ning around the Congressional Senators William Proxmire (D-
building, California's roads and in Wis.) and Strom Thurmond (R-
the mid-West. I S.C.) are joggers and so is George
"They" are America's tens of Allen, coach of the Washington
thousands of joggers who have de- Redskins professional f o o t b a 11
Sylvias Signs
SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 1973
What's in store till Tuesday?
Pisces. (Feb. 19-March 20). Sunday is an
excellent day for a Piscean to promote
their interests wherever they are. Mon-
day finds you convincing others of your
point of view. Liberate them.
Aries. (March 21-April 19). An incident
today should definitely expose the insin-
cerity of one of your acquaintances. Mon-
day spiritual enhancement is found among new friends. Indul-
gence!
Taurus. (April ,0-May 20). Avoid upsetting your present love af-
fair as the Full Moon could prove disquieting. It would be wise to
study hard on Monday as it is becoming harder to catch up.
Gemini. (May 21-June 20). You will find yourself doing the un-
conventional today. Be careful, danger lurks not far behind. Mon-
day will be a lucky day as events seem to fall as planned.
Cancer. (June 21-July 22). Make amends to those individuals
you have slighted. Interpersonal problems seem to get resolved.
Avoid tensions on Monday as your surroundings will be swirling.
Keep cool.
Leo. (July 23-Aug. 22). Don't be overly critical in trying to get
your point across to others. Use your imagination to create ex-
citing plans to share with friends. Monday will find the telephone
a limited source to romance.
Virgo. (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). The Full Moon instills in you a mag-
netic attractiveness. Spend the evening at home with close friends
for the most enjoyment. Quickly accomplish all tasks tomorrow.
Libra. (Sept. 23-Oct. 22). Love relationship should stabilize this
evening as the proper mood is created. Good fortune finds you
Monday as you stick to doing things in your own fashion.
Scorpio. (Oct. 23-Nov. 21). Circulate. Emotions are high and
you are strung headlong into some weird but nice relationships.
Ionday is a good day to do little things for others.
Sagittarius. (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). Despite the situation, don't dis-
cuss your personal affairs today. Others are difficult to please.
Monday will find you reorganizing your schedule to facilitate fi-
nancial and social gain.
Capricorn. (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). Update your views and opinions
and convert others to your way of thinking. Curb your unethical
behavior on Monday. An important individual is judging your
actions.
Aquarius. (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). You finally are able to cash in on
the obligations and tasks you have been meeting. Monday has
you busily preparing for the future as you find all your desires
are realizable.

team. So is Larry Lewis, a 105-1
year-old hotel waiter in San Fran-
cisco.
Lewis is one of the founding'
members of the National Jogging
Association, the Washington-based
center for joggers who are more
than just casual about their run-
ning.I
The NJA purpose, set forth by a
former Air Force Surgeon General,
Dr. Richard Bohannon, when the!
group was founded five years ago,
is "to promote the cheapest, quick-
est and most efficient way to
achieving physical fitness."
Senator Proxmire, 57, who jogs
five miles from his home to his
congressional office nearly every
day and does it not only to exer-
cise. He says he also beats the
rush-hour traffic.
Sometimes, though, joggers cause
traffic congestions themselves, es-
pecially in New York, where resi-
dents have no place to jog other
than the crowded streets. But most
find quiet streets in residential
areas or even go by car to run-
ning tracks for their exercise.
The NJA Executive Director, 34-
year-old Gary Olsen, a jogger for:
the past 12 years, says his organi-
zation has about 5,500 members,
mostly in the United States, al-
though 100 are in such exotic
branches as the Teheran U.S. Mili-
tary Mission Joggers and The -Roy-
al Bangkok Sports Club Joggers.
Thousands of other Americans
jog without belonging to organi-
zations. Most of the members,

BERLIN (UPI)-Adolph Hitler
wasted no time in deciding who
was guilty.
"Look," he said, gazing at the
blazing Reichstag building, seat
of the German parliament. "You
can thank the Communists for
that."
"This is the beginning of the
Communist revolution," shouted
Hermann Goering, the Reichstag
president who also was at the
scene. "We must not wait a min-
ute. We will show no mercy. Ev-
ery Communist deputy must be
strung up this very night."
For the Nazis, the fire of 40
years ago today was a godsend.
It took place only four weeks af-
ter Hitler became chancellor of
Germany and he used it as a
pretext to rush all opposition and
institute the totalitarian rule that
led to World War II.
But who set the fire?
Forty years later the contro-
versy still rages. Men of good
will, anti-Nazi historians, dis-
agree violently. Perhaps the
truth never will be known.
T h e controversy r e v o lves
around Marinus Van Der Lubbe,
the simple 24-year-old Dutch
Communist who was convicted
of setting the fire on the night of
Feb. 27, 1933, and was beheaded.
The Communist plot theory ad-
vanced by the Nazis never did
stand up.
The Nazis arrested Ernst Torg-
ler, leader of the Communist
party bloc in the Reichstag,f
Georgi Dimitroff, the Comintern
leader who later became post-
war premier of Bulgaria, and
two other Bulgarian Communists
and put them on trial with Van
Der Lubbe before the supreme
court.
But Dimitroff made a complete
fool of Goering at the trial and
he and the other Communist lead-
ers were acquitted despite the
pressure placed on the court by
the Nazis.
The conclusion that the Com-
munists did not set the fire does
not prove the Nazis set it them-
;selves.
The foremost advocate of the
theory that the Dutchman alone
was responsible is Fritz Tobias, a
West German Social democrat
who began his research convinc-
ed that the Nazis were respon-
sible. He has given his views in
his book "The Reichstag Fire -
Legend and Reality."
The Michigan Dailv edited and man-

"Through a series of accidents
and happy circumstances, I
reached the conclusion that sur-
prised myself that the arson was
that of the Dutchman alone, who
by setting the fires in public
buildings in Berlin wanted to
arouse the workers to a revolu-
tionary uprising against the hat-
ed capitalist system," Tobias
wrote.
He said the supporters of the
theory that the Nazis set the
fire, particularly the Communist
supporters of the theory, suppress
the fact that Van Der Lubbe tried
to set thre other fires two days
before the Reichstag fire - in a
welfare office, the city hall and
the Berlin palace of the Hohen-
zollerns.
"He only was successful in the
Reichstag because he had ideal
prerequisiteis in the parliamen-
tary hall filled withair and oxy-
gen,' Tobias said.
Tobias grants that the fire
changed everything overnight
and provided the Nazis with a
pretext to launch what was in ef-
fect a revolution to abolish rule
of law and establish a dictator-
ship. But he insists it was not
planned.
"Hitler's considering the pro-
test action of a young anarchist
as a 'signal for revolt' and the
'counter-measures' ordered by
him were spontaneous reactions
of horror and not the well organ-
ized, clever move to get rid of
his opponents," Tobias said.
"E ER E A INCH"
was the motto
of the Stampers of Oregon...
and live it they did!
NhIDME8L S8RRaZIN
r 4 ,7 $
Based on the Novel by
KEN KESEY
TUES. & THURS., March 20 & 22
Modern Languages Bldg., Aud. 3
7:30 & 9:30 p.m. $1.25
NEW WORLD FILM,CO-OP
Daily Classifieds
Bring Results

still a i
But the International Commit-
ittee for Scientific Research into
the Causes and , Effects of the
Second World War disagrees with
Tobias.
The committee, established in
1969 took the fire as its first job.
Its report, published last July,
said the Thermodynamic Insti-
tute at West Berlin's Technologi-
cal University studied all the evi-
dence and with the help of com-
puters proved it was impossible
for a single person to have set
the fire in the time available to
the Dutchman.
The report said a command of
Nazi stormtroppers brought in-
flammable material into the
Reichstag through the tunnel
from Goering's home.
It said the stormtroppers set
the fire in the main meeting hall
while Van Der Lubbe set insig-
nificant fires elsewhere.
A study of Nazi party records
reveals that police officials who
exonerated the Nazis from all
complicity at the time were Nazi
party members themselves, the
report said.

nystery
Reports of non-Nazi fire depart-
ment officials and police officials
were suppressed, the report said.
The controversy has become so
heated that Tobias is suing Dr.
Edouard Calic, general secretary
of the committee, for slander.
Gen. Franz Hauser, chief of
the German general staff at the
beginning of the war, testified
at the Nuernberg war crimes
trials that at a birthday party
for Hitler in 1942 Goering admit-
ted he was behind the fire. Haus-
er said they were talking about
the Reichstag when Goering
shouted, "The only one who re-
ally knows about the Reichstag
is I, because I set the fire."
But Goering steadfastly denied
having anything to do with the
fire at the Nuernberg trial. And
the international military tribu-
nal that sentenced Goering to
death by hanging could not clear
up the mystery. Goering beat the
hangman by taking poison.
The Reichstag now has been
rebuilt after 10 years work. It
cost almost $50 million dollars.

Sunday, March 18, 1973
THE ANN ARBOR
CANTATA SINGERS
AND CHAMBER ORCHESTRA
Edwa d Markward, Conductor
Geor- Frzd&r~ck Handel
SRAEL
IN EGYPT
SUNDAY, MARCH 18,
8:00 P.M.
UNIVERSITY REFORMED
CHURCH
E. HURON AT FLETCHER
ADMISSION: ADULTS, $1.50;
STUDENTS & CHILDREN, $0.75
Tickets at the Music Shop, 717
No. University, and at the door.
Based on th eve oy
ICEBERG SLIM
Sat. & Sun. at 5:15,
7 p.m. & 9 p m
Mon. & Tues. at
1 3. S. 7. 9D.m.

A1

EMU Major Events Committee
presents
with special guest
H owlin Wolf

MARCH 23, 8:00 P.M.
BOWEN FIELD HOUSE

A

$2-$3-$4 Reserved
Tickets may be purchased at
Ann Arbor Music Mart, Huc-
kleberry Party Store, McKenny
Union, Hudsons, The, Branch.
APRIL 7: URIAH HEEP
BILLY PRESTON

Sat. & Sun. at 1 p.m. & 3l
"SNOOPY COME
HOME"
All seats 75c

p..

I

I"

971-4323

in vinga iy, ele UUa
whose average age is about 46, aged by students at the University of
have been jogging for four or five Michigan. News phone: 764-0562. Second
years and got into it when they be- Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
gan to worry about their expanding iia.420 Mynard tree, Anni Arbor,
gan o wory aout heirexpading chigan 48104.aPublished daily Tues-
waistlines. cay through Sunday morning Univer-
. , sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
A Wyoming runner wrote in'"The 'carrier (campus area); $11 local mail
Jogger," the NJA publication, that (in Mich. or Ohio); $13 non-local mail
he no longer has a lunch break at (other states and foreign).
work. It's an exercise break, he Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
says, and he jogs. lion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
Another runner, a former lung area); $6.50 local mail (in Mich. or
rgeOpatient in Kentucky, hio) $7.50 non-local mail (other
surgery patin n etcy,1 states and foreign).

1

4

wrote that "within a week (of the
operation) I did a brisk mile walk-
ing in the hospital corridor, non-
stop. Of course I wore my jogging:
shoes. You can't get down to seri-
ous walking in bed slippers."
The NJA headquarters is in the
basement of an old office building,
six blocks from the White House,
and is cluttered with brochures and
leaflets broadcasting the joys and'
health of jogging.

IO~A Inu.aI-.SI

written by NEIL SIMON
directed by ELAINE MA*
"ONE OF THE
YEAR'S BEST"
-N.Y. TIMES
--NEWSWEEK
---TIME
--NEW YORKER
2 ACADEMY AWARD
NOMINATIONS
Jeannie Berlin, best
supporting Actress.
Eddie Albert, best
supporting Actor.

I 'A .. / .....,, ,' ' . ... ,
ATTENTION FRESHMEN!
U.A.C. Is Looking for
a PRODUCER FOR NEXT YEAR'S
SOPHSHOW
Applications May Be Picked Up in the UAC
Office, 2nd Floor Michigan Union, and Must Be
Returned by Friday, March 23.
-" - --------
1.

i

S-------_ TODAY AT 1-3-5-7-9

1

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Matinee Tickets Available

Amp Give-Away Sale

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