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March 16, 1973 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-03-16

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, March 16, 1913

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY Friday, March 16, 1973

Panel examines women's
movement, conciousness

WANTED: ARTIST
To be responsible for the design, lay-out and distri-
bution of a weekly joint film schedule. Solary and
free pass to oil independent film societies.
Contact: 769-7353
Coalition of Independent Campus Film Societies

l

(Continued from Page 1)
The goal of the conference was "to provide a
showcase for the fine scholarship in the areas
relating to women that is going on here at the
University," according to Dorothy McGuigan,
conference coordinator and staff member at the
Center for the Continuing Education of Women
(CCEW).
Although the conference was "open to women
and men, not closed to anyone," the audience
consisted mainly of females of all ages, with a
faint sprinkling of males. Of the 32 speakers,
three were men. The opening panel discussion
drew a crowd of about 800 persons, while about

200 were present at the afternoon psychology ses-
sion alone.
Response to the conference varied from one
student's comment that, "I was a little annoyed
at the over-intellectualized rhetoric of it all," to
a housewife's, "I think it's marvelous but it
should be a whole semester's course." Another
woman added, "Yes, it's over so soon, then it's
time to go home and do the dishes."
The conference was co-sponsored by CCEW
and the National Coalition on Women's Educa-
tion and Development and its proceedings will
be published in paperback this summer by
CCEW.

I

See 65 exciting powerhouses, including sleek front-
wheel drives and classic era sporting cars, all set against
the backdrop of one of the world's finest auto collections,
Free movies, '72 Indy. Hours: 9-5 weekdays, 9-10 Fri.,
Sat., Sun. Henry Ford Museum, Dearborn, Michigan.
thru tlcarch 25
Henrg Ford Pluseumi

J

UAC-DAYSTAR PRESENTS
BETTE MIDLER

JA

-

A

NEW WORLD MEDIA presents

There's help for the newborn
at a special hospital unit

(Continued from Page 1)
"There used to be reluctance tor
use this service," recalls Dr. Rob-
ert Borer, co-director of the Inten-
sive Care Nurseries. "Bqt most
doctors feel better about it when
they learn that we have never:
lost an infant in transfer, and that'
many actually get better during
the trip."
What does a doctor do, for ex-
ample, if a newborn baby goes
into seizure? The treatment must
be immediate, yet the symptom is
common to many diseases.
Again, Holden can help. A call
to the new Birth Defects Diagnos-.
tic Program may bring a quick
answer.
Supported by a recent grant
from the National Foundation-
March of Dimes, the program acts
as an information bank for physi-
cians throughout Michigan. The
services behind the program have
already been in operation for three
years, notes Dr. Roy Schmickel,.
one of three co-directors of the!
program, and it has served 50 to
70 patients each year. The new
funds will enable the program to
expand.
"In the past ten years the num-
ber of known genetic diseases has
doubled," Schmickel points out.
"Half of our job is educating doc-
tors so they will be aware of the
diagnostic possibilities."
Another important facet of the
program -is its pre-natal genetic
counseling, available to families
with a known history of genetic
disease. Many genetic disorders
can be detected before birth by
amniocentesis, the study of the
amniotic fluid surrounding a fetus.
The process involves drawing offI
less than an ounce of fluid through
a long needle inserted into the ab-
domen.
"Women who otherwise would

never get pregnant will do so now,
knowing they can be diagnosed,"
Schmickel says.
The successes are the happiest
stories, but often the verdict is
bad news. The anxious parents
may be told that their new baby
will have hemophilia, a rare bloodj
disease which entails repeated
transfusions and hepatitis, and us-
ually prevents its victims from
leading a normal life. Or the baby
m a y suffer from gargoylism,i
which causes severe arthritis and
brain damage: its victims have an
IQ of about 30.
Schmickel says doctors at Hol-
den have been performing abor-
tions for several years when se-
vere disease is diagnosed in the
fetus.
"We were always willing to re-
interpret the law in these cases,"
he explains. "We weren't afraid to
tell people we were doing these
abortions, and -no one chose to
prosecute us for it."
The overwhelming emphasis at
Holden, however, is on keeping
babies alive after birth. One third
of the babies in the Intensive Care
Nurseries are born at Holden,
where special care can be given to
the mother as well as the baby,
both before and after delivery. The
baby's status can be monitored
before birth by tracking both the
mother's heartbeat and his own.
"Heartbeat patterns can tell us
whether the mother has enough
strength for a normal labor," says
Borer. "If not, we know we will
have to do a Caesarian section."
Each of the Intensive Care Nur-
series is a bright, hot cubicle
where ten babies in specially
equipped incubators fight for their
lives. The ticking of heartbeat and
respiration monitors provide per-
sistent background noise, but a
baby's cry is rare. Unable to

breathe on their own, many need
artificial respirators to keep them
alive. With an average of one
nurse per baby, the nurseries are
crowded and very busy.
Though constantly the center of
attention, the tiny patients are un-
aware of the activity which sur-
rounds them. Few are more than
a foot long, and the smallest baby
weighs just slightly more than two
pounds. Born prematurely, he has
a developmental lung disease.
Even with the artificial respirator,
he has only a 5 per cent chance of
survival, according to Dr. William
Scott, a neonatologist at Holden.
Despite such desperate odds, the
overall survival rate at Holden is
better than 50 per cent, Borer esti-
mates. The average stay in the
Intensive Care Nurseries is only
three weeks.
"We get very attached to ba-
bies that are here longer," says
Barbara Lanese, head nurse in the
Intensive Care Nurseries. "If we
-lose one, we always feel there was
something more we could have
done. To us, it's kind of like los-
ing a part of the family."
BUMMED'OUT ON
CAR REPAIRS
So are we but we do
offer no rip-off service
VW-CORVA I R-GM
VOLVO-DATSON
DIAGNOSTIC SERVICE
1663-2441-1150 Rosewood
Modified Sports Cars

Program No. 3
** THIS WEEK **
"THE
EAST
Is
RED"

INTERNATIONAL FILM &

SAT., MARCH 31-8 p.m.

Hill Aud.

Reserved Seats $4.00-3.50-2.50
MICH. UNION 11-5:30MON.-SAT

sorry, no personal checks

763-4553

I

I

NEW HEAVENLY
BLUE
In Benefit Concert For
CAROL JONES
2nd Ward Democratic Counrcil Candidate
Friday, March 16, 8:00 P.M.
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
Tickets $1.50 On Sale
in the Fishbowl 10-3 p.m.
and at the Door
FREE NHB ALBUM WITH PURCHASE
OF 6 OR MORE TICKETS
Sponsored by University Democratic Caucus
I--------------------- ---

***Special guest speaker from thi
Chinese Student Association

TONIGHT-7:30 P.M.
MULTI-PURPOSE RM. (3rd floor)
Undergraduate Library, U of M Campus
SPONSORED BY NEW WORLD FILM CO-OP

NO
ADMISSION
CHARGE

II

T-
TONIHT ad Sturday

New Morning Spring

Film Extravaganza

Counter-Culture and Revolution
A UNIQUE DUPLEX OF FEATURE FILMS AND SHORTS
ALLEN GINSBERG and PETER ORLOVSKY

& GCET ANY
EXTRA -_r° r a '
LARGE
PIZZA FOR TH E y wy7~ 7~
PRICE OF A
LARGE
PIZZA
zizza
LIBERTY at DIVISION
769-8030 FREE DELIVERY
OFFER GOOD FRI., MARCH 16, 1973 HOURS: Mon.-Fri.: 4 p.m.-3 a.m.
Sat. & Sun.: Noon-3 a.m.
Ia

Amp
Used and New
List $495.00
or best offer
Best Offer
Best Offer

Give-Away Sale

INTRODUCTORY COURSES
IN ASIAN STUDIES
FALL TERM 1973
Asian Studies courses are an interdisciplinary an-
alysis of the cultural units of Asia, describing the
historical development, socio-economic patterns,
political traditions, and religious, philosophical,
literary, and artistic accomplishments of the tradi-
tional cultures.
Asian Studies 111, 121, or 131 may be used to ful-
fill a one-course Humanities distribution require-
ment. A two-course sequence of Asian Studies 111- .
333, 121-122, or 131-132 may be taken to fulfill
either the Humanities orSocial Science distribution
requirements of LS&A.
111 GREAT TRADITIONS OF SOUTH AND
SOUTHEAST ASIA
jThe development of Hindu, Buddhist, Join, and Islamic tradi-
tions; Ancient empires; the role of the individual in his society;
traditional art, literature, musc, dance, and drama.
121 GREAT TRADITIONS OF EAST ASIA
The development of Tao, Confucian, Buddhist, and Zen philoso-
phies in China and Japan; dynastic cycles; literary, artistic, and
folk legacies.
131 (GREAT TRADlITIONS OF THE NEAR EAST

1968 dir. ROBERT FRANK

91 mins. COLOR

Me and My Brother

FENDER
PLUSH
GBX
SOUND CITY

50-400 Watts RMS
150 Watts RMS
120 Watts RMS
and up
120 Watts RMS
and up

-PLUS-Jack Kerouac in PULL MY DAISY
Saul Landau's a unique portrait
-PLUS- DInterview with Allende
bi A

i

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