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March 15, 1973 - Image 6

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Michigan Daily, 1973-03-15

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I

Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, March 15, 1973

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AXED IN ARIZONA

Batsmen return

from sun

TORmenting
chuck bloom

By MARC FELDMAN
The Michigan baseball team
made its annual pilgrimmage to
the collegiate baseball hotbed of
Arizona last week and sacrificed
itself to the improvement of the
season records of powerful Ari-
zona and Arizona State with
seven consecutive losses before
salvaging one win with a ten
inning 1-0 conquest of Glendale
College.
Despite the disappointing 1-7
log Michigan Coach Moby Bene-
dict was not upset with the team's
showing on the trip. "'m' not
disappointed with our record. It's
nice to win but that also depends
on who you're playing and under
what circumstances."
Indeed the "circumstances"
that Benedict refers to were all
on the side of the home clubs.

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Arizona boasts ideal weather
throughout most of the year and
baseball for the universities is
almost a year-round affair.
While Michigan is stuck in
Yost Field House for most of its
pre-season training and for the
three week interval between the
Arizona trip and the rest of the
season, the Arizona and Cali-
fornia schools frolick in the sun
and start their 60 to 65 game
schedule in February.
ARIZONA STATE, for instance,
plays 65 games this spring in-
cluding contests with the Mil-
waukee Brewers, California An-
gles, and the world champion
Oakland A's.
One of the problems that
plagued Michigan throughout the
trip was fielding, especially
among the infielders. "We had
trouble picking the ball up on
the infield," Benedict moaned.
"It's tough after just practicing
in Yost to plunge right into game
conditions as we did."
Michigan dropped 3-1 and 11-4
decisions to Arizona in a March
3 twinbill as seven of the 14
Wildcat runs were unearned, in-
cluding all three in the opener.
The Wolverines might have had
a chance in the second game but
three errors in the six run sec-
ond inning turned a 1-1 tie into
a 7-1 Wildcat lead.
Michigan was in contention in
most of the games, especially in
the latter part of the trip, but
errors and lack of scoring punch
proved to the Wolverines' down-
fall. The Wolverines were out-
scored 48-19 in the eight games
and outhit .307 to .212.
TOM KETTINGER, the Michi-
gan leftfielder, was the spark-

plug of whatever offensive power
the Wolverines showed last week.
The senior from Oak Park, Il-
linois collected nine hits in 26
at bats for a .346 average and
4 runs batted in.
Veteran first baseman Pat Sul-
livan had nine safeties and a
.281 average and freshman Don
Damiani of Bloomfield Hills pa-
trolled center field and stroked
five singles and two doubles in
25 trips for a respectable .280
average. The rest of the regulars
were under the .250 mark.
The designatedhitter, in use
in both college baseball and the
American League this year, prov-
ed to be no cure all for the
Wolverines. The various hitters
appointed by Benedict to swing
for the pitcher combined for just
4 hits in 28 tries (.143) but the
opponents were much more suc-
cessful with ten hits in 30 at bats,
an average of .333.
Tom Joyce, 'Michigan's sopho-
more lefthander, had the best in-
dividual pitching performance of
the trip in the last game when
he shackled Glendale College on

IN TOURNEY:
UCLAns face Devils

four hits for nine innings in
gaining the 1-0 victory. Peter
Ross saved the win for Joyce with
a perfect tenth inning.
GREG FORHAN also pitched
well but all he has to show for
it is an 0-2 record. The sopho-
more righthander was the victim
of the fielding lapses of his team-
mates in bowing to Arizona 3-1
and absorbing a 5-3 loss to the
Sun Devils. Forhan gave up 13
hits in 14 innings and compiled a
respectable 2.57 earned run
average.
Art Adams and Pete Helt had
a rougher time on the hill as each
suffered a pair of losses for his
efforts. Helt's 5.91 ERA was a
far cry from his Big Ten leading
form of 2 years ago andsAdams
gave up ten earned runs for a
6.28 ERA.
Benedict still remains optimis-
tic about his team's chances in
the Big Ten this season. "If we
play hard and get everything to-
gether, there's no reason why
this club can't win the Big Ten."

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Combining honesty, vigor, and
enthusiasm, and Michigan Foot-
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week with the opening of Mich-
igan's spring football practice.
Hurt by the loss of four seniors,
the managers are presently lack-
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Besides the obvious benefits of
knowing the players and coach-v
es, consider the free seasono
tickets, and possible road tripsr
with the team (for free). If this1
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THE GIRLS ATr
The Martha Cook Bldg. 0
WANT TO MEET O
YOU!0
ALL WOMEN STUDENTS V
-ARE INVITED TO A TEA O
Friday, March 16 0
3:30-5:00p.m.
for
minutes.

From wire service Reports In the
Coach John Wooden and his derbilt,
UCLA Bruins will begin their quest while A
for their seventh consecutive NCAA tucky.'
basketball championship tonight match
when they battle Arizona State in phis Sta
Los Angeles. ana wit]
The Sun Devils, Western Athletic Syracus
Conference champion, earned the sylvani
chance to challenge the Bruins by ..... s
downing Oklahoma City 102-78 in
the first round of the tourney. 1
In spite of UCLA's seeming
impregnability coach Ned Wulk
of Arizona State is not planning
stall or slowdown tactics. "IPennsy
don't believe in that kind of Syracus
thing. We'll play it the way we
have all year," said Wulk adding,
"They are, after all, human. Marque
Sooner or later they're going to Austin l
lose."
Both the Sun Devils and the
heavily favored Bruins are fast- otw
breakyteams relying on speed asn Southw
well as rebounding strength to South
overcome foes. South
This game will begin at approxi-Mem
mately midnight Eastern time fol-
lowing the Long Beach State-SanL
Francisco contest. The winners of Long B
these two games will meet Satur- Arizon
day at UCLA's Pauley Pavilion in all ti
the quarter-finals of the tourna- m
ment.
I A :..A I INS.

e Mideast regional at Van-
Marquette plays Indiana
ustin Peay challenges Ken-
The Midwest regional will
South Carolina with Mem
te and Southwestern Louisi-
h Kansas State. In the East,
e plays Maryland and Penn-
opposes Providence.'
5 against UCLA
EAST
At Charlotte, N.C.
Ivania vs. Providence, 7:10.
e vs. Maryland, 9:10.
MIDEAST
At Vanderbilt, Tenn.
tte vs. Indiana,, 7:10.
Peay vs. Kentucky, 9:10.
MIDWEST
At Houston, Texas
estern Louisiana vs.
as State, 8:10.
arolina vs.
phis State, 10:10.
WEST
At Los Angeles, Calif.
each State vs.
Francisco, 10:10.
State vs. UCLA, 12:10.
aes EST)
V TA>f1>" ,M1 l{ ". ia

Tom Szuba..
.* *future champion
FOLLOWING the recently completed Big Ten Swimming and
Diving Championships, held here in Ann Arbor, if the local
press representatives got together to vote on the meet's out-
standing tanker, the nod would undoubtedly have gone to some
Indiana swimmer: either Gary Hall or John Kinsella for winning
three individual events apiece.
However, the meet's most valuable swimmers (with the
emphasis of the word value, meaning the tankers singular con-
tribution to his team) would have to be Michigan's Tom Szuba.
Szuba means more to Coach Gus Stager's forces than practic-
ally any other tanker in the conference.
Individually, Szuba accounted for 44 meet points while an-
choring relays. that garnered another 54 markers for the Wol-
verines. The freshman from Dearborn won the 400-yard indi-
vidual medley, placed second in both the 200yard IM and 200-
yard butterfly. He anchored the 800-yard freestyle relay with a
time better than Kinsella's clocking when the Indiana star won
the regular 200-yard event.
This type of versatility is quite important when you're try-
ing to score points in a championship meet, and no better ex-
ample of this statement is next week's NCAA Championship meet
in Knoxville, Tennessee. Michigan will be trying to better last
year's tenth place finish, and hopefully rise to sixth. To achieve
this goal, the Wolverines must pass such swim powers as
Southern Methodist, Princeton, and Washington. Most of the
hopes ride on the brawny shoulders of Szuba. For the first
time in years, Michigan could have a national swimming cham-
pion when Szuba races in the 400-IM. His stiffest opposition, at
this time, cames from a pair of West Coast tankers, Steve Fur-
niss and Rich Collela, both from Washington. But based on his
performance at the Big Tens, Szuba must be labeled as one of
the favorites.
Throughout this swimming season, I have used many super-
latives to describe Szuba: sensational, exciting, phenomenal,
crowd-pleasing, and talented. He is all these things plus. His
ability to swim so many different strokes, and all of them very
well, has spelled the difference for Michigan swimming this year.
He has brought an excitement, an enthusiastic attitude that just
naturally seems to catch on with the other members of he
eam.
But if you don't believe me, read what some others, far
more knowledgable than I in the area of swimming, say about
Szuba.
f Bob Mowerson, coach, Minnesota-"I wish I had him.
Believe me, the sky's the limit for the young man. He'll break
all of Gary Hall's records in the individual medley. He'll be one
of the all-time great Michigan swimmers and he'll have a great
collegiate career. I wish the hell he was at Minnesota."
" Robert Allen, coach, Iowa-"Szuba is one of the best
swimmers in this conference, if not the nation."
" Bob Steele, coach, Northwestern-"Szuba's a very talented
kid. He's the type of swimmer that makes a coach famous. If he
was here, plus four or five more like him, I'd be famous. He'll
be a national champion for sure. He's been a national caliber
swimmer for a year now."
" James "Doc" Counsilman, coach, Indiana-"He's a real
good swimmer and could really help our'own team even as
strong as it is. He's consistent-I was impressed two years ago
in the AAU Nationals and I'm more impressed now. He'll do well
in the NCAA's. "The best .thing about Szuba is that he doesn't
ask any questions when you tell him something to do. He's a real
team swimmer. And most important, he swims very, very fast."
0 Gary Hall, swimmer, Indiana-"Tom's a real tough com-
petitor. For sure, he'll be a national champion; perhaps very
soon. And in the 1976 Montreal (Olympic) Games, he'll be a real
factor there. Believe me."
Szuba's parents, who like most parents have pushed Tom
along throughout his career, think more of a meaningless pro-
motion for this very humble reporter than their own son's ac-
complishments. But his father confided to me later about the
upcoming NCAA meet, "We've been waiting a long time for
this."
Mr. Szuba, so has Ton, coach Stager, and all Michigan
swimming fans.
U- -__-_--------

A

IAE

H LulvW IlI lul

* 0

16

'4

It's allIhad time
..Ihave alit class inlO

wit oU lwSC hol.
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r

The University of Michigan
Dept. of Germanic Languages and Literatures
presents
GEORG BUCHNER'S
Woyzek and Leonce and Lena
Woyzek on March 16 & 22 at 8:00 p.m.
Leonce and Lena on March 17 & 23 at 8:00 p.m.
Both plays will be presented on March 18
beginning at 2:00 p.m.

---

Tickets: students-$2.00
Sun. Matinee: students-$3.00

non-students -$2.50
non-students-$4.00

Residential college Auditorium

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INTERVIEWING FOR STAFF ON THE CAMPUS ON SATURDAY, MARCH 11th
General counselors, athletic specialists, tennis, riflery, archery, drama, boating, and assist-
ant waterfront needed.

SPECIAL ON-CAMPUS CLASS OPENS MARCH 15

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