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March 15, 1973 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1973-03-15

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Thursday, March 15, 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

T h u r s d a y , M a r c h 1 5 ,111111111111119 7 31111TH E 11MI C H I G A N111111DA I L Y11 P a g e11| T h r e e11 1

A 38-hour endurance

As American as
Disney or Warhol

test of 'pure cinema'

9

By DAVID GRUBER
Fortunately, there is more to
movies than big names. As com-
mercial theatres and student
film organizations try to stay
afloat on the reputations of direc-
tors, performers, and box office
hits, the 11th Ann Arbor Film
Festival is alive and well while
having only the elements of sur-
prise in its favor.
I imagine that to the majority
of people watching the festival,
myself included, most, if not all,
of the names in the various cre-
dit listings are unknown. Not pub-
licity statements in themselves,
they only make us strangely
aware that in some place nearby
or far away there exists such-,
and-such a person, bearing such-
and-suchaname, who hasmade
one of the films to appear in
the Architecture Auditorium this
week. With the film this more
or less anonymous filmmaker has
put his or her imagination on the
line, and we come in to laugh,
applaud, hiss, or go stir crazy.
In its diversity the festival is a

kind of endurance test for both
the filmmakers and the aud-
ience: how long will each film
hold up?
Opening night held up quite
well. The auditorium was pack-
ed and growing hot, but the mov-
ies, for the most part were good.
There was certainly more clev-
erness displayed in these f i r s t
films, particularly the animated
films like Cels and Gilgames,
than I can remember noticing on
the first few nights of last year's
festival. Story lines, when there
were story lines (Autostop and
Too Much Coffee and Not Enough
Sleep, for instance) were much
more interesting and involving,
and the one computer film shown
T u e s d a y, Apotheosis, had its
colors, patterns and sounds well
organized.
What had the greatest impact
on me, however, and this is not
to belittle other films, was Crime
and Unjust Punishment, a 15-
minute documentary against
capital punishment. While its ar-
gument was totally one-sided,

which is alright to people who
agree, but not terribly fair to
those who don't (what was that
we learned in freshman Enlish
about argumentative papers?),
it was still a griping film. This
may say something Fr straight,
unadorned documentary, i e., the
technique of simply having peo-
ple voice their opinions in front
of the camera.
After the movies are over,
one has time to wonder about the
futures of those behind and in
the films. Here and there one
can find definite strains of tal-
ent. Will these filmmakers ever
reach the big festivals in Cannes
or Venice? Will they and their
casts and crews bec >mne b i g
names (some, admittedly, already
are)?
The festival, though, gives us
a chance to see pros azl ama-
teurs alike, one right after the
other, without all these associa-
tions. We see what is there at
the moment, react to it, then get
set for what follows. In pressur-
ing a film of relatively h o r t
duration to be coherent, direct,
and effective while minrnizing
the time the audience has to
think about what it has seen,
the festival may be as close to a
showing of "pure cinema" as we
can get. The festival will con-
tinue through Sunday.

K

By SARA RIMER
The American Musical 310 may
not produce another George Ger-
shwin, nor may Underground
Film 309 produce another Andy
Warhol. But both new Course
Mart courses do fill a gaping
need in the University curricu-
lum. They each began because
some students wanted to take
similar courses. Since none al-
ready existed, they found them-
selves in the role of instructor.
The similarity between the two
courses, however, ends here. The
American Musical is as whole-
some and acceptable an institu-
tion as Walt Disney, while t h e
films shown in Underground Film
would hardly be run at local com-
mercial theatres.
Underground Film is taught by
undergraduates Louis Miller and
Michael Priebe. Both are found-
ers of the Ann Arbor Film Co-
op, and members of Cinema II
Film Society, and they have com-
pleted independent studies in
film.
"Underground Film is like a
Great Books course, only it deals
with great films," Miller ex-
plains. The course meets three
times anweek for discussion and
FINK films and there will be several
F IN K guest lecturers this term.
con- Although Miller and Priebe de-
arring clined to rigidly define under-
ground films, they described the
films involved in. the course
as "avant garde, independent, ex-
perimental; ones not commercial-
ly distributed."
orgue" Miller admits to a slight sus-
picion that some students may
have been attracted to the course
as a kind of Popular Pornography
course. One movie show, 'Flam-
ing Creatures," washconfiscated
67) by the AA Police Dept. when
Cinema Guild presented it in
66) 1967.
Miller and Priebe hope t h a t
students will gain enough con-
fidence to evaluate films them-
selves without resorting to re-
views. Discussions of relation-
ships between underground film

and literature, drama, politics,
music, dance, painting, and be-
tween underground and tradi-
tional films are planned. These
should create a sense ^f histori-
cal development, provide a ne-
cessary theoretical / critical
overview and encourage viewing
and responding to the films in
visual - rather than literary
or dramatic - terms.
No matter how avant-garde and
uncommercial the material in
the course, there is still that
traditional method -of evaluation
to contend with - grades.. Mil-
ler's very appealing grading
philosophy is modeled after
George Harrison's album . .-.
"All Things Must Pass."
It is almost essential for stu-
dents taking The American Mu-
sical to arrive fifteen minutes
before the class's official start-
mgtie It is durn this tim
and in the two hour class's break
that the class.is at its liveliest.
Comments on musicals, both
scathingand laudatory, are ex-
changed, and it is easy to under-
stand why the course is so in-
teresting. Undergraduate M a r k
Kriechman's qualifications to
teach it range from director of
seven productions to a compos-
er forthe Farmington Summer
Theatre.
Kriechman views himself more
as a coordinator giving the class
order than as a traditional lec-
turer. He combines informal lec-
turing with record playing and
discusion. He is by \no means
in a position of educating thetn-
initiated into the joys of the
Broadway musical. Students'
backgrounds range from a bud-
ding composer to a WCBN an-
nouncer for the Broadway show
to a girl who wants to choreo-
graph. Kriechman claims t h a t
there is very little creative out-
let for these students in the Uni-
versity. Since the course requires
some kind of original material
and a performance of part of
an existing musical, students will
have ample opportunity to dis-
play their talent.

Eleventh Ann Arbor Film Festival
Tonight through Sunday. Screenings at 7, 9, 11.
Thursday & Friday. Saturday at 1 :00 p.m., 7:00,
9:00 p.m. Winners & Highlights Sunday 7:00, 9:00
& 1 1 :00 in Architecture Auditorium & Auditorium
A, Angell Hall. Tickets-$1.00-On Sale Each'
Night at 6:00 p.m. at Architecture Aud. No Ad-
vance Sales.
FILM FESTIVAL WNRZ RADIO NEWSREEL
102.9 FM-on LARRY MONROE'S 10 p.m.-2 a.m. Show.
- - -

Doily Photo by KEN
Dennis James performs on the pipe organ at the Michigan Theater last night. He first gave a
cert and sing-a-long program and then accompan ied The Mark of Zorro, a 1920 silent film stE
Douglas Fairbanks, Jr.

N
Sho

Based on the novel by
ICEBERG SLIM
OPEN
ow Q12:45
SHOW
wing! 1/AT
1,3, 5
7&9 P.
79;-
uth state
A TE r
one 642-626, r
Shake hands with
"Folks"and"Blue' And then count your fingers!
K EoK EAW

4
5,
..

OFFICE OF FINANCIAL AID ANNOUNCES..
Applications for Renewal of
Aid Are Now Available
in
2011 SA B
(8:30-12:30 and 1:30-4:30)
All students who received assistance through the Office of
Financial Aid during 1972-73, and who wish to reapply for
next year, should pick up these materials by no later than:
FRIDAY, MARCH 16
COMPLETED APPLICATIONS DUE MAY 1, 1973
NEW WORLD MEDIA presents
PROGRAM NO. 3
International Film&
Discussion Series
--THIS WEEK
"THE
EAST Is RED"

ton ight
6:00 2 4 7 News
50 Fiintstones
56 Operation Second Chance
6:30 2 CBS News
4 NBC News
7 ABC News
9 1 Dream of Jeannie
50 Gilligan's Island
56 Classroom Meetings
7:00 2 Truth or Consequences
4 News
7 To Tell the Truth
9 Beverly Hillbillies
50 NVAA Basketball
56 Course of Our Times
7:30 2 What's My Line?
4 Circus!
7 Michigan Outdoors
9 Movie
"Tartan and the Slave Girl."
(1950)
56 Behind the Lines
8:00 2 The Waltons
4 Flip Wilson
7 Mod Squad
56 Advocates
9:00 2 Applause
4 Ironside
7 Kung Fu
9 News
56 An American Family
50 Merv Griffin
9:30 9 Happy Though Married

0

11:00 2 4 7 News
9 CBC News
11:20 9 News
11:30 2 Movie
"Murders in the Rue M
(1971)
4 Johnny Carson
7 TV Times
50 Movie
"Magic Town" (1947)
12:00 9 Movie
"The King's Pirate." (19
1:00 4 7 News
1:15 2 iovie
"Tender Scoundrel" (19
2:45 2TV High School
35 20 News
cable tv
channel 3
3:30 Pixanne
4:00 Today's Woman
4:30 Something Else (Rock)
5:00 Stratasphere Playhouse
5 :30 Local News and Events
6:00 Love and the Law
6:30 NCAASports
7:00-8:00 Community Dialogue
wcbn
89.5 fm
9:00 The Morning After
12:00 Progressive Rock
4:00 Folk
7:00 Future World Lecture Seri
J. B. Rhine
8:00 Jazz
11:00 Progressive Rock
3:00 Sign-off

es-

Concert features new
musical directons

The Cpntemporary Directions
Ensemble,. conducted by Sydney
Hodkinson, will present a concert
of new American and European
music this Saturday night at 8:00
in Rackham- Lecture H -Al. This
will be the sixth public appear-
ance of the group thi3 year,
which is now a credit ensemble
in the University's School of
Music.

EMU Major Events Committee
presents
B B KI
with special guest
Howlin Wolfe

10:00 4
9.
561
10:30 9I
501

Dean Martin
Streets of San Francisco
Adieu Alouette
Masterpiece Theatre
Countrytime
Perry Mason

The history of the Chinese Peoples
epic ballad opera form.
"A SIGHT TO BEHOLD"-

Revolutionary struggle in
--N.Y. Times

MARCH 23, 8:00 P.M.
BOWEN FIELD HOUSE
$2-$3-$4 F
Tickets may be purchased at
Ann Arbor Music Mart, Huc-
kleberry Party Store, McKenny
Union and Hudsons
APRIL 7: URIAHIIIEP

FRIDAY 7:30 P.M.
MULTI-PURPOSE ROOM (3rd Floor) Undergrad. Library
NO ADMISSION CHARGE U of M Campus
***Special guest speaker from the Chinese Student Association
SPONSORED BY NEW WORLD FILM CO-OP

COMING
KEN KESEY'S
pau NEtD ioniNiNRg FonDa
minmEl.
saaa n v
TUESDAY & THURSDAY
MARCH 20 & 22
NEW WORLD FILM CO-OP

C1.,UL TURE CALENDAR
DRAMA-The U Players present Shakespeare's King Lear at
8 tonight in the Power Center.
FILMS-Cinema Guild presents the eleventh annual Ann
Arbor Film Festival in Arch. Aud., at 7,9,11 tonight. New
World Film Co-op presents Warhol's Trash at 7:30, 9:30
in Aud. 3 in the Modern Language Bldg. Ann Arbor Film
Co-op presents Russell's Women in Love at 7, 9 in Aud.
A Angell. South Quad Films presents Kubrick's 2001: A
Space Odyssey and Hip Hurry in the Cafeteria at 6:45,
9:45 tonight.
DANCE-Program by dance composition students: at 4 in
the Waterman.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC-Piano student recital: SM Recital Hall
at 12:30 this afternoon. Woodwind quintet: Rackham at
8 tonight.
RETURN CHILD CARE
TELEPHONE SURVEYS

Two works for solo instruments
by one of the* world's leading
composers will be presented.
Elinor Hathaway, a se'tior harp
major and Thomas Clark, trom-
bonist on the theory faculty of
Indiana University, will perform
Luciano Berio's Sequenzas No.
2 and No. 5. Two vocal ocamber
pieces by the young P o 1i s h
composer. Krzysztof Meyer and
the Canadian Bruce Mather will
be offered. The second perform-
ance of David Foley's Cat Music
I for brass quintet will also be
featured. Foley is on the music
faculty of Ball State University,
Muncie, Indiana and will be a
guest of the Compositio'n Depart-
ment for this concert.
Opening the program, the. cn-"
semble will play Caroms by Uni-
versity composer William Al-
bright and the evening will close
with New Yorker William Bol-
com's 'Session 3". William Ben-
jamin of the University's Theory
faculty will be guest pianist in
the Bolcom work.
A special prelude to the con-
cert will be offered by R. Hud-
son Ladd, University Carillon-
neur. Beginning at 7:15 p.m.,
Ladd will present a 45 minute
program of contemporary music
for the carillon at Burton Tower,
opposite Rackham Auditorium.
Many young composers are cur-
rently writing for the carillon and
Ladd has chosen an interesting
recital of avant-garde works se-
lected from his performances in
United States and abroad. The
playing cabin of the carillon will
be open to any interested mem-
bers of the audience.
artistic writing
poetry, and music,
drama, dance, film,
or writing feature
stories about the
arts: Contact ArtE
Editor, c/0 The
Michigan: Daily.

s

I

JAZZ

IN DETROIT

ALLEN GINSBERG,
JACK KEROUAC
in two films by ROBERT FRANK
ME AND
MY BROTHER.

WEATHER REPRT
MAR. 16o18
STRATA CONCERT GALLERY/46 SELDEN
TICKETS: $4 advance. $5 at door
FIRST SHOW, 9:30-SECOND SHOW, MIDNIGHT FRI. & SAT.
FIRST SHOW, 8:00-SECOND SHOW, 10:30/SUN.

to Rm.

332,

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT: STRATA CONCERT GALLERY, 831-1666
DISCOUNT RECORDS, 1235 S. UNIV.,

I

ANN ARBOR

Michigan Union
by Friday
763-4186

P-

I

1968

91 mms COLOR

0

moml

Fiction and documentary portrait of the relationship
among Ginsberg, Peter Orloysky and his "schizo-
phrenic" brother-brilliant and tender.
-PLUS-
PULL MY DAISY
Frank's infectiously high-spirited profile of the
"Beat Generation," narrated by Jack Kerouac.
7:15 and 9:30

I-

TONIGHT!-MARCH 15-ONLY!-7 & 9:30 p.m.

r

KenE sIN LOVE
Ken Russell's masterpiece based on D.H. Lawrence's novel witb GLENDA

.

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