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March 14, 1973 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-03-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Wednesday, March 14.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

V®ge Nine

Wednesday, March ~l ~I. THE MICHIGAN DAILY i~age Nine

Michigan Men's Glee Club

BRUINS EVERYONE'S FAVORITE:
UCLA Cla s

7

directed by WILLIS C.

PA T TERSON

By BRIAN DEMING
The UCLA national tournament
is underway and it's the Bruins
against the world. The UCLA na-
tional tournament, formally known
as the NCAA Championship tourna-
ment, began last Saturday and for
the seventh-straight year it appears
that no one will disturb the omni-
potent basketball kings from Los
Angeles.
"My optimism going into the
NCAA playoffs is about the same'
as last year's-I wouldn't trade my
chances with anyone," says John
Wooden, head honcho of the mighty
Uclans. Wooden's charges - Bill
Walton, Keith Wilkes, Larry Holly-
field and company-begin their an-
nual journey to triumph Thursday'
I against Western Athletic Confer-
ence champion Arizona State.
To earn the dubious opportunity
to challenge UCLA, the Sun Devils
whipped Oklahoma City 102-78 in
the opening round of the tourney.
In other first round action in
the west regional, Pacific Coast
Athletic Association titlist and
third ranked Long Beach State
scored a 88-75 victory over Weber
State, Big Sky Conference repre-
sentative. Long Beach State will
encounter West Coast Athletic
Conference winner San Fran-
, cisco, Thursday.
In the Mideast regional at Day-
ton, Saturday, fifth ranked Mar-
quette topped Mid-American Con-
ference champion Miami of Ohio,

77-62, while Austin Peay, Ohio Val-
ley representative, upset Jackson-
ville 77-75.
"Marquette does not have the
one dominating player like two
years ago, but has a starting five
that is better," remarked Miami
coach Darrell Hedrick after Mar-
quette humbled his Redskins. The
Warriors from Milwaukee will show
down with Big Ten Champ Indiana
tomorrow night at Vanderbilt.
Austin Peay lost a 15-point half-
time lead in the closing minutes of
their game against Jacksonville but
won on a tie-breaking shot by
freshman James "Fly" Williams
with four seconds left. The Gov-
ernors from this Tennessee college
will face Kentucky of the South-
eastern Conference after the In-
diana-Marquette game at Vander-
bilt.
In the Midwest Regional South
Carolina eliminated Southwest
Conference champion Texas Tech
78-70 and Southwestern Louisiana
dumped Houston 102-89.
The second round of the Midwest
regional will take place tomorrow
night at Houston where South Caro-
lina will face Memphis State, Mis-
souri Valley Conference champ,
and Southwestern Louisiana will
take on Kansas State of the Big
Eight Conference.
Kansas State clinched the Big
Eight crown last Saturday when
it drubbed Colorado 76-66 while
Missouri downed Nebraska 86-70 to

;ic' proceeds
earn a berth in the National In- dence soundly gained vi
vitational Tournament. St. Joseph's, Pennsylvan
Eighth-ranked Maryland will be- first round game.
gin their bid for the NCAA crown Penn's Ivy League
when they face Syracuse tomorrow champions came from b
night in Charlotte, North Carolina. losing a nine-point leadt
The Terps defeated Syracuse ear- John's 62-61 in the tour
lier this season 90-76. round.
Representing the Atlantic Coast The discipline, the coa
Conference, Maryland replaces un- talent of UCLA makes t
defeated and second-ranked North by any assessment, u
Carolina State. N.C. State is in- With the absence of the r
eligible because of a one-year pro- ising challenger, North
bation imposed by the NCAA for State, the Bruin fortress
alleged basketball recruiting ir- pregnable. But Goliath
regularities. structable, the Titanic w,
Led by Ernie DiGregorio with 25 able, and Thomas Dewey
points in the second half, Provi- dent.

ctory over
nia, in its
basketball
ehind after
to beat St.
ney's first
aching, the
he Bruins,
unbeatable.
most prom-
Carolina
seems im-
was inde-
'as unsink-
was resi-

SPRI

Gd

Co

CERT

Wolfpack, 49ers trail
Walton andCo. in poii
LOS ANGELES (I)-For the fifth said that now, with the regular
time, UCLA has been voted thea season over, "teams 'aren't going
No. 1 college basketball team in to be on a crusade to beat us. In
the land in The Associated Press' the regular season, if someone had
final poll and for the fifth time beaten us, they'd have celebrated
John Wooden says: as if they'd won the national cham-
"It's very pleasing, but you know pionship. But it's sudden death for
the real national championship will everybody now."
be decided on the court." Everybody, that is, except North
Wooden says polls are more Carolina State, the nation's No. 2
meaningful in football, where teams teah, which is ineligible for post-
don't usually play each other. He season play because of recruiting

Saturddy, March 24-8:30 P.M.
Hill Auditorium
TICKET SALES BEGIN, TODAY!!!!

$1-$2-$3 at Hill

Box Office,

9-5 M-S

S0F

E

JOUR

ALISS

The UNIVERSITY OF' MICHIGAN
CENTER FOR RUSSIAN AND
EAST EUROPEAN STUDIES
annlflOun Ces its course offering for the Fall Term
395 SURVEY OF THE SOVIET UNION-an inter-
disciplinary survey of the history, politics, government,
economy, social institutions, literature and arts of the
Soviet Union and its relations with the rest of the
world. 4 credits

1.
2.1
.3.1
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.1
9.1
10.
11.
12.
13.1
14.
15.1
16.,
17.1
18.
19.

UCLA (28)
N. Carolina St. (3)
Long Beach St.
Providence
Marquette
Indiana
SW Louisiana (1',
Maryland
Kansas State
Minnesota
N. Carolina
Memphis St.
Houston
Syracuse
Missouri
Arizona St.
Kentucky
Pennsylvania
(tie) Austin Peay
San Francisco

V 1V1dWAR,/

The Top

20
26-0
27-0
25-2
25-2
24-3
19-5
23-3
22-6
22-4
20-4
22-7
21-5
23-4
23-4
21-5
19-7
19-7
20-5
22-5
22-4

632
578
477
409
394
288
212
200
197
179
130
129
114
112
62
37
35
29
27
27

LL

FFER

GS,

Get 'r A in the Groove
Groovy \\rARoom

The following are among the Journalism Department classes
for fall term for which adequate published descriptions are
not otherwise available. A full listing is in the pre-classifica-
tion time schedule. 400-level courses are primarily for un-
dergraduates; 500-level are open to both undergraduates and
graduates; 700 and 800-level courses are primarily for gradu-
ate students, but can be elected by undergraduates with per-

mission of instructor..
500-007 IMMIGRANT PRESS
(Marzolf) T3.6
A cultural analysis of the foreign-language press in 19th and
20th Century America. This seminar will examine the growth
and decline of the foreign-language press and its response to
immigration, assimilation, restriction, prejudice, and selected
political and social issues. The press of old and new immi-
grant groups and the new ethnic "cause" papers will be cov-
ered. (2 credits)
500-14 THE MASS AUDIENCE
(Robinson) M3-5
This seminar will explore the functioning of television and
newspapers in delivering news and entertainment. The inter-
play of the media and other societal institutions will be con-
sidered, on such matters as transmitting information, promot-
ing societal change inculcating values and stereotypes, chang-
ing uses of leisure, socializing children, and influencing con-
sumer and voting behavior. (2 credits.
761 CONTEMPORARY PER-
SPECTIVES IN MASS COM-
MUNICATION RESEARCH
(Kline) time to be arranged.
This seminar focuses on the breadth of the field of mass com-
munication research. The contemporary trends of research,
past accomplishments, models of research, and the special
tools that are germane to communication problems will be
discussed. Individual or team projects will be organized
around issues arising from the seminar discussions. (2 credits}
750 INTERPRETING THE ARTS
(Field) MF1:30-3
Thi is~ n wAitinnr nt f*C for +kC4 a ,rpfaA in ,writinn n rkai i

500-009 POPULAR CULTURE
(Stevens) T10-12
After preliminary discussions about the nature of the media
as mass culture, each student will prepare a seminar report
on some aspect, such as sports and the media, children's pro-
gramming, comics or the lovelorn columns as reflections of
contemporary values, genres in literature or the movies. (2
credits
500-017 COMMUNICATION &
INNOVATION (Rogers)
time to be arranged
The class will study how ideas, products, and practices per-
ceived as new by an individual, diffuse to the members of
the social system. What accounts for the rate of adoption,
what attributes are central to the diffusion process, who are
the innovators? These questions will form a major part of the
seminar. Class requirements will be determined at the first
meeting. (2 credits:
805 HISTORY OF MASS COM-
MUNICATIONS (Stevens)
Th10-12
This seminar introduces concepts, techniques and materials
of mass communications history and permits the student to do
substantive historical research. It is NOT an overview of me-
dia history; rather it concentrates on a specific area. This
[C rm that focus will be on the comic strips. Students can ap-
p oach their history from many directions. Guest speakers,
archive visits, short projects, and one major paper, (3 credits,
406 MASS COMMUNICATION
RESEARCH (Kline) MWF9
plus discussions.
This lecture/discussion class will pose major questions of the
rnh- f temacc mrlinin the acar- ii, ovmi i nrlnrm nn irn

Mozartmania

A must for all Mozart lovers-an evening with the Moz-
arteum Orchestra of Salzburg, under the direction of Leopold
Hager, in an all-Mozart program sampling the chamber, op-
eratic, symphonic, and choral works of this great master.
Rita Streich, renowned soprano, appears as soloist in the first
half of the program, and again as one of four vocalists in the
second half.
Following intermission, Donald Bryant conducts the 100-
voice Festival Chorus of the University Choral Union in the
"Coronation' Mass. Joining Miss Streich, are four University

School of Music faculty members: Rosemary Russell, con-
tralto; John McCollum, tenor; Ralph Herbert, baritone; and
Marilyn Mason, organist.
- PROGRAM -
Divertimento in F for Strings
"L'amero saro costante" from Il Re Pastore
"Deh vieni non tardar" from Le Nozze di Figaro
Symphony No. 40 in G minor
"Coronation" Mass for Mixed Chorus, Soloists and Orchestra

6WAIVER SITY

'I

I

i I

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