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March 14, 1973 - Image 7

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Michigan Daily, 1973-03-14

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wlpdrfesdoy, March 14, 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

t'49e Seen

W~cJn~esdoy, March 14, 1 ~73 THE MfCH!GAN DAiLY 1'Qge 5everi
U

I

glIsh

epartment

ings

Spring

Term

hA

FOR PREREGISTRATION AND REGISTRATION

123 FRESHMAN COMP (REASKE)
See time schedule for CEW section.

MTWThF 11

I Synge, Riders to the Sea; Chekhov, Cherry Orchard; Shaw, Doc-
tor's Dilemma; O'Neill, Emperor Jones; O'Casey, Juno and the
Paycock, Brecht, The Caucasian Chalk Circle; Beckett, All that
Fall, Act Without Words; Albee, Zoo Story. One or two plays
may be substituted. Informal discussion.

tragedy, history, romance) and from every stage of the. play-
wright's career. About half of the class time will be given over
to lectures; the other half will be divided among some of the
following activities: discussion sessions, student reports, analysis
of problems in staging and character portrayal, comparative
studies of methods of interpreting the plays.

150 FR COMP-SHAKESPEARE (KNOTT)
Intensive study of selected Shakespeare plays.I
assignments with papers and writing problems
in class.

MTWThF 9
Frequent writing
to be discussed

269 INTRO TO AMER LIT

(REASKE) LEC MW 9

For sections see time schedule.

426 PRACTICAL CRITICISM
430 CONTEMP LIT-FICTION

(WILLSON)
MTWThI 11

MTWTh 9

GREAT BOOKS 201 (LUNN) MTWThiF 10
Texts: Homer, Iliad; Hesiod, Theogony, Works and Days; Aes-
chylus, Otesteia; Sophocles, Oedipus the King, Oedipus at Colo-
nos, Antigone; Euripides, Medea, Alcestis, Hippolytus, Trojan
Women, len, Electa, Bacchae; Plato, Euthyphro, Symposium,
Apology, Phoedo, The Republic; Aristotle, Poetics, Nichomachean
Ethics; Virgil, Aeneid.
223 CREATIVE WRITING (JOHNSON) MTWTh 1
Though other forms of writing will be covered and encouraged,
the main thrust of the course will be on poetry. Through the use
of an anthology, the class will explore the literary heritage open
to the beginning writer. There will be workshop sessions for
discussion of student writing and indivdual conferences.
231 INTRO TO LIT: POETRY (STAFF) MTWThF 10
A disciplined introduction to the reading of poetry, English and
American, culminating in the study of one major poet,
232 SHORT STORY & NOVEL (SCHULZE) LEC MW 11
For sections see time schedule.
Introduction to the study of prose fiction: novels and short
stories. Authors: Fielding, Austen, Dickens, Joyce, James, Law-
rence, Conrad.
235 INTRO TO LIT: DRAMA (LUNN) MTWThF 12
An introductory course to the literary and theatrical arts involved
in drama. Plays: Sophocles, Oedipus Rex, Antigone; Euripides,
Medea; Marlowe, Doctor Faustus; Shakespeare, Henry IV, Part
1, Othello; Ibsen, Heddo Gabler; Rostand, Cyrano De Bergerac;

281 CORE I: GT ENGL BKS (JENSEN) MTWThF 11
English 281 will focus on some of the acknowledged master-
pieces of earlier English literature. Class sessions will be. evenly
balanced between lecture and discussion; lectures will concen-
trate on the literary-historical context of the works, on matters
of literary and dramatic convention, and on the critical heritage.
Discussions will spend less time on these matters, rather more
on close textual analysis and on the exploration of connections
among the works themselves. Authors include: Chaucer, Spenser,
Jonson, Milton.
325-1 INTERMED EXPOSITION - (KNOTT) MTWTh 11
Reading in forms of contemporary non-fiction, with parallel
writing assignments (descriptive writing, journal writing, auto-
biography, reportage, review, short essays'. Class time will be
divided between discussion ofeselected texts and discussion of
+ student papers. Writers studied will include Hemingway (A
Moveable Feast), George Orwell, Alfred Kazin (A Walker in the
City), Joan Didion (Slouching Towards Bethlehem), and others
to be chosen in class.
325-2 INTERMED'EXPOSITION (EBY) MTWTh 10
A course in practical exposition. Study of outside samples and
analysis of prose submitted by the. participants. Objective: to
achieve facility in communication and expression. Practice, not
theory.
350 SHAKESPEARE PLAYS (JENSEN) MTWTh 1
Students will read a representative selection of Shakespeare's
plays chosen from among the various dramatic kinds (comedy,

Lecture and discussion. Joyce, Lawrence, Camus, Gide, Mann,
Kafka, Hemingway and Faulkner.
432 NOVEL SINCE 1850 (SCHULZE) MTWTh 8
Great modern novels, English and Continental, e.g. Madam
Bovary, Anna Karenina, Ulysses, The Trial.
443 ENG AUTH: MEDIEVAL (McNAMARA) MTWTh 10
Course will be a study of medieval drama. We will read plays
in their various forms (liturgical drama, miracles, mysteries,
moralities, farces, interludes) and will study the whole of one
drama cycle, the Wakefeld Mystery Plays. Class exercises, one
substantial essay, one final examination. We will attempt pro-
duction of at least one or two of the plays; a good deal of our
study will be given to exploring the place of the drama in
medieval life, and the, means of producing the plays.
445 CHAUCER-CANT TALES (McNAMARA) MTWTh 8
An introduction to the poetry of Chaucer as represented by a
selection from The Canterbury Tales. We learn to read the Tales
in Middle English through required tape listening as well as
reading assignments, class lectures and discussion. The text
used is F.N. Robinson The Works of Geoffrey Chaucer (second
edition).
465 MOD ENGL AUTHORS (GINDIN) MTWTh 2
An intensive study of the major works of the three authors listed
below. The interruptible lecture. Authors: Virginia Woolf, D.H.
Lawrence, and T.S. Eliot.,

471 AMER AUTH 1914-PRES' (EBY) MTWTh 1
Authors include: Hemingway, West, Faulkner.
476 CONT AF-AM LIT (JOHNSON) MTWTh 3
Emphasis will be on the language of criticism in black literature.
531 CONTEMP FICT (GINDIN) MTWTh 1
Lectures and discussion on fiction and drama since 1945. The
course will include novelists such as Sartre, Camus, Robbe-
Grillet, Gunter Gross, Iris Murdoch, Barth, Bellow, di Lampedusa,
Angus Wilson, Mailer, and John Fowles, dramatists (taking
about 1/ of the course) such as Brecht, lonesco, Durrenmatt,
Pinter, and Albee..
547 RENAISSANCE PERIOD (FRASER) MW 10-12
The purpose of the course is to look hard at the best "plain
style" poetry of the 16th century. Emphasis will fall on the
poems themselves, which will be examined intensively in class.
Attempt will be made, by means of informal lectures and with
the help of students reports, at a more general view of impor-
tant "trends" and "developments" in this period, like the rise
of blank verse, the exploiting of other poetic forms, the opposi-
tion of secular and religious poetry, the, great vogue of trans-
lation, the writing of "providential" history, the attempt to
render in language "the naked truth." If the course succeeds,
it will be on the basis of much good poetry estimated and re-
membered, in its historical and cultural context. Authors in-
clude: Wyatt, Surrey, Greville, Ralegh, Jonson.
566 MODERN PERIOD (BLOTNER) MTWTh 3
Attention will focus on changing themes and techniques through
the time-span covered. Authors include: Conrad, Lawrence,
Forster, Joyce, Woolf, and Huxley or Greene.

I.

569 AMER LIT

(HAYDEN )

MTWTh 2

Summer

Term
1 481 ENGLISH BIBLE

HB
(ORLIN) MTWTh 9

123 FRESHMAN COMP

(WEILAND)

MTWThF 9

150 FR COMP--SHAKESPEARE (SANDS) MTWThF 8
The course will utilize selected plays by Shakespeare (in all
probability, six in number) as the basis for a series of expository
essays. Background material presented in lecture form will alter-
note with class discussions of the essential rhetorical norms of
good prose.
223 CREATIVE WRITING (GREENHUT) MTWTh 2
The character of the ccurse will be shaped by the character of
the students. Students may write in one or more of the major
forms: verse, fiction, essay. Class time will be devoted to in-
formal discussion of specimen works illustrative of formal and
technical approaches, and as much as possible to discussion of
student writing. Conferences will serve the special needs and
concerns of individual students.
231 INTRO TO LIT-POETRY (STAFF) MTWThF 1
Discussions and exercises will cover the elements of poetry:
imagery, allusion, connotation, sound, freedom and pattern, etc.
The class will decide to study one poet in detail, and students
will be expected to write a paper on some facet of his work. The
general aim of the course is to develop the student's critical
skills, allowing him to judge the value of poems he reads.
232 SHORT STORY & NOVEL (ELKINS) MTWThF 8
269 INTRO TO AM LIT (RAEBURN) MTWThF 10
Course will examine in close detail selected works by the follow-
ing authors. Melville, Twain, Fitzgerald, Hemingway. Emphasis
on, class discussion.
282 CORE II: GT BKS (FORSTNER) MTWThF 9
A masterpiece survey frem 1789 to the present including the
works of Blake, Coleridge,, Keats, George Eliot, Yeats, Joyce,
Woolf, Lawrence and Beckett.
325 INTERMED EXPOSITION (MULLIN) MTWTh 11
Authors include: Plato & Aristotle. The tradition of Classical
and Medieval Rhetoric.
350 SHAKESPEARE PLAYS (ELKINS) MTWTh 1 1

407 INTRO TO MOD ENGLISH (ROBINSON) MTWTh 10
Contemporary social and regional dialects and views of the
shared properties of American English; the relation of current
research on these topics to classroom practice. A course designed
particularly for potential and in-service secondary school
teachers.
426 PRACTICAL CRITICISM (ENGEL) MTWTh 10
In addition to the authors, the work of students will be read in,
class. Discussion. Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Shakespeare,
Ibsen.
435 CONTEM LIT-DRAMA (ENGEL) MTWTh 1
Discussion. Local theatre-going desirable. Ibsen, Strindberg,
Chekhov, Shaw, O'Neill, Brecht Beckett.

This course will attempt to keep three lines of inquiry moving:
1. An investigation of the genres of Biblical literature, with
close examination of outstanding examples of each genre..
2. Discussion of the transmission of the English Bible and the
latter's influence upon the formation of English literary con-
sciousness. 3. Reading of poems on Biblical subjects from the
Norton Anthology of English Poetry.
FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS

580 DEVELOPMENT OF LITERACY
(BAILEY & ROBINSON)

569 AMER LIT (RAEBURN) , MTWTh 1
The reading for this course will be drawn from American Iitera,-
ture from 1 865 to ca. 1920. Among the writers to be discussed
are Twain, de Forest, Howells, James, Norris, Dreiser, London.
Emphasis will be on the "social novel" in its cultural and his-
torical context.

TTh 1-3

Rhetoric of the classroom and means by which student fluency
in writing can be achieved. A course designed for experienced
teachers of lower-division English at four-year institutions and
community college instructors of English, communication arts,
and developmental studies. Intermediate course. Permission of
instructor required.

501 INTRO TO OLD ENGLISH
Study of the essentials of the
toward an engagement with theI

(DOWNER) MTWTh 8
West Saxon dialect is directed
literature written in Old English.

582 THE POPULAR ARTS

(FELHEIM)

TTh 10-12

441 RECENT POETRY

(HAYDEN)

MTWTh 11

445 CHAUCER-CANT TALES (SANDS) MTWTh 11
After preliminary and brief instruction on how one reads
Chaucerian verse aloud, the class reads all of The Canterbury
Tales (with the exception of "The Parson's Tale" and "The
Tale of Melibee")'.

507 STUDY OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE (HALLIDAY) MW 2-4
Subtitle: Functional-semantic Analysis of
Contemporary English,
Characterization of the linguistic system from a sociolinguistic
viewpoint, wth attention to texts drawn from different varieties.
Intermediate course level. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

453 ENGL ROMANTIC AUTH (FORSTNER)
A close look at the works of Blake., Coleridge,
Keats with particular emphasis given to their
the secular revolution otherwise known as the
ment.

MTWTh 1
Wordsworth and
contributions to
Romantic move-

534 DRAMA

(STYAN) MTWTh 2

A survey of two chief modes of dramatic experience, chiefly in
the English theatre. The approach will involve, as appropriate,
'direct method' teaching, performance analysis, stage and
audience conditions, and the perceptual study of a few texts
from Shakespeare, the commedia dell'arte, the Restoration,
Victorian melodrama, modern realism, and the Contemporary
English Theatre.

Lecture and discussion, bringing background material in the
text up-to-date and applying and testing it in light of rhetorical
ideas and cultural applications. Russel Nye, The Unembarrassed
Muse; and selected short short works of popular arts.
669-70 AMER LIT (RAEBURN) MTWTh 11; MW 1-3
A double proseminar concentrating on Herman Melville.
707,STUDIES IN ENGL LANG (HALLIDAY) TTh 2-4
Subtitle: Sociolinguistic Study of Early Language Development.
An investigation of the development of the functional-semantic
system, with data from intensive study of one child aged 9 to 24
months. Linguistic, sociological, and educationgl implications,
Intermediate course level. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
811 ENGLISH LANG (KUHN) TTh 2-4
Subtitle: Old English Dialects.
The course will begin with a few lectures on the dialects of old
English manuscripts and ms evidence, palaeography, etc. As soon
as practicable, the students will begin to research individual
problems; their research will later be presented orally, before
the seminar group, and in written form at the end of the course..
The research topics will be chosen by the individual students,
but topics concerned with either the Mercian or the Northum-
brian dialect are to be preferred. Anon. The Vespasian Psalter.
Anon. The Lindisfarne and Rushworth Gospels.

465 MOD ENGL AUTHORS (WEILAND) MTWTh 11
Lawrence: The Rainbow, Women in Love, Studies in Classic
American Literature, Lawrence in Italy, Selected Poems, St.
Mawr. Huxley: Point Counterpoint. Yeats: Selected Poems,
Essays and Introductions.
471 AM AUTHOR-1914 TO PRES (MULLIN) MTWTh 8
An attempt to place Mailer as the significant writer of his
generation; a probing of his philosophical and political prejudices
as well as his literary achievement.

536 (LING 661) STYLISTICS

(BAILEY) TTh 4-6

Subtitle: Language Planning and Standardization.
Survey of theories and actual attempts to plan language. Dis-
cussion of principles together with a consideration of the rele-
vance of modern linguistics to language planning and standard-
ization. Intermediate level course. Prerequisite: an introductory
course in linguistics.

Counselling

for

English

PARIS

~1

The English Department is currently forming a new Counselling Program. In the future English Concen-
trators iri the General Program and in the Teaching Certificate Program do not have to see a Counsellor for most
matters. Counsellors are available, however, and students are urged to request an appointment to discuss any
matter of concern. Appointments may be made through the Counselling Office, 1223 Angell Hall.
Each concentrator must have one session with an English Department Counsellor, at the beginning of the
concentration. At that time, he will be notified of the departmental requirements, and he will sign a state-
mrent stating that he understands them. Every English concentrator should make an appointment with a coun-
sellor during pre-classification for Fall Term, 1973.
Thereafter, for all Election requests, for Drops and Adds during the normal Drop and Add period, the
student may have his program approved by a stamp obtained from the English Department office, 1603 Haven

6--9 UNIVERSITY of MICHIGAN CREDITS
Spend this summer in Paris in a program offered for the first time by the De
partment of English.

ENGLISH 498 (3 Credits) PARIS IN THE TWENTIES
Why was there such a concentration of great talent in Paris in
the twenties, and how did this city influence the writers who
made it their home? In the context of these questions, we will
consider selected works of Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald,
John Dos Passos, T.S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, E.E. Cummings, Hart
Crane, James Joyce and others. The student is expected to
familiarize himself with the locales which figure prominently
in the works of these writers, and to recreate the ambiance
which proved so receptive to them.

will examine modern translations from French, old French and
Provencal, beginning with the poets of the nineties (Arthur
Symons,, Ernest Dowson) and then considering the early modern
poets (Ezra Pound, William Butler Yeats, T.S. Eliot, Marianne
Moore) and concluding withcontemporary poets (Robert
Lowell, Richard Wilbur, W.S. Merwin, and W.D. Snodgrass).
Why has there been this passion in the. twentieth century to
"make it new"? What is the relationship between a translo-
tion and the original poem, and between a translation and the
translator's own poetry? These are a few of the questions we
will be trying to answer.

Hall. ENGLISH 499 (3 Credits) THE ART OF POETIC TRANSLATION

INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-3 Credits)

The twentieth century has witnessed a period of literary trans-
lation which surpasses even that of the Renaissance. This course

Independent study in film or literature is possible with the
consent of the instructor.

For change of courses after the Drop and Add period, for any departure from Departmental requirements,
students are required to see a departmental counsellor.

Total expenses for 8 weeks program $1200

I

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