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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, March 13, 1973

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY Tuesday, March I 3, 1973
U

U

t

nglish

epartment

erings

Fall

1973

FOR PREREGISTRATION AND REGISTRATION

(CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE)
441 RECENT POETRY (GOLDSTEIN) MWF 1
A special (but not exclusive) topic of the course will be the
reaponse of American poets to critical issues of contemporary
history. I he materials incorporated into "political poetry," its
new language and verse forms, continue to redefine what a
poem. is and ought to be. A survey of contemporary English
poetry will be part of the syllabus as well..Titles currently being
considered for adoption are the following: Berryman, Homage to
Mistress Bradstreet;Bly, Sleepers Joining Hands; Casey, Obsceni-
ties; Corso, tlegiac Feelings American; Dickey, Poems 1957-67;
Ginsberg, The Fall of America; Harper, Debridement; Hay-
den, Words for the Mourning Time; Levertov, Relearning the
Alphabet; Lowell, Notebook; Olson, The Maximus Poems 1-ll;
Plath, Ariel; Rich, The Will to Change; Schevill, Violence and
Glory; Sexton, Transformations; Snyder, Myths and Texts.

442 (HUM 460) AMER POETS

(ROSS) MWF 1

471-2 AMER AUTH 1914-PRES (BLOTNER) MWF 1
The authors studied in this course will be F. Scott Fitzgerald,
E. Hemingway, and W. Faulkner. For each author, students will
read a collecti n of short stories and then go on to major novels,
tentatively The Great Gatsby and Tender is the Night for Fitz-
gerald; The Sun Also Rises, A Farewell to Arms, and For Whom
The Bell Tolls for Hemingway; The Sound and the Fury, Sanc-
tuary, Light in August, and Absalom, Absalom! for Faulkner.
This material will explore diverse areas and themes in American
literatute and culture, e.g., the 1920's and 1930's, The South,
"the American Dream" and disillusionment. There will also be
close attention to style as well as form: Fitzgerald's poetic
prose, Hemingway's terseness, Faulkner's rhetoric, among other
devices. Each segment will begin with introductory material on
relevant elements of the author's life and work. There will then
be a rapid progression with each work from sources to compo-
sition to critical assessment. Insofar as class size will permit, the
discussion method will be used once the preliminaries are treated.
473 AM LIT 1630-1870 (GIPSON) MWF 9
Authors treated include: Bradstreet, Taylor, Irving, Cooper,
Emerson, Hawthorne.
475 (AFRO) EARLY LIT-AF-AM (GIPSON) MWF 11
Authors treated include: Chesnutt, Dunbar, DuBois, Johnson,
Cullen, Toomer, McKay.
476 (AFRO) CONTEMP AF-AM LIT (JOHNSON) MWF 3
Major emphasis will be on Leroi Jones (drama), Ishmael Reed
(novel) and David Henderson & Bob Kaufman (poetry). Some
cycles in modern black lit. will be treated as background, for
example, the Harlem Renaissance (centering on Langston
Hughes); the Eclectic Renaissance (which will be discussed as
exemplified in writers of the fifties and early sixties-,Baldwin,
Ellison, Hayden); the "Broadside" Renaissance of the seventies
and its moral and political implications. The artistic/esthetic
energies and problems in all cycles will also be emphasized.
Lecture-discussion; detailed program of lectures available in
2607 Haven Hall and dept. office.

study of Chaucer's English will serve as the point of departure.
This will be followed by a close examination of the language
during the late fifteenth century, viewed in the light of the
social and cultural climate of the period.
The language of the age of Spenser, Shakespeare, and
their Jacobean successors is enough like Modern English to be
highly deceptive. To extract the fullest meaning from Eliza-
bethan writing requires a systematic knowledge of both the
spoken; and the written language of the period, as well as an
awareness of the questions about diction and style which were
living issues at the time. An exploration of these topics will be
followed by a consideration of the linguistc attitudes character-
istic of the eighteenth century and their effect upon lexicog-
raphy and grammar, again considered in terms of a newly
emerging class structure and its cultural component. The course
will conclude with a consideration of the rise and development
of American English, with attention to the use of both social
and regional dialects in literature, particularly in the nineteenth
century.

523-1 CREATIVE WRITING

(HAYDEN)

ARR

443 ENGL AUTH-MEDIEVAL (GARBATY) MWF 11
Works include Beowulf, King Horn, Havelok the Dane, Gawain
and the Green Knight, Piers Plowman, Miracle Plays, Everyman,
Malory's Morte Darthur.
All will be read in the original except Beowulf and Piers Plow-
man. Lectures are on the historical and critical background of
the individual works, on Courtly Love, romances, drama, etc.
Class work will include translation of Middle English, brief
background in Old English scansion, discussion, play reading,
and formal assigned writing. Survey covers a difficult period,
filled with periodic flashes of magic and love. It covers above
all, a period based on positive, ethical, and social values. As
such all the literature is didactic, groping for sanity and civiliza-
tion.
444 MILTON (CREETH) MWF 2
Lectures on all of Milton's English poetry and two or three of
his major prose works.

445 CHAUCER-CANT TALES

(DOWNER)

MWF l

478-1 (HUM 464) AMER DRAMA

(MARTIN)

MWF 1

447 ENGL REN AUTHORS (KHANNA) MWF 11
The psychology of love as reflected in Renaissance literature.
A study of attitudes to love and of conventions governing the
treatment of love in literature. Readings in Seventeenth century
psychology (Burton's Anatomy of Melancholy) and in the poetry
of Marlowe, Sydney, Shakespeare and Donne.
449 SHAKESPEARE-DRAMATIC WKS (CATHCART)
MWF 10
This is the first semester of a two semester study and will con-
front Shakespeare's Elizabethan plays, Venus and Adonis, The
Rape of Lucrece, The Sonnets, The Phoenix and the Turtle.
The course will emphasize the progress of Shakespeare's dra-
matic career and will introduce Shakespearean scholarship and
criticism. Primarily lecture.
451 NEO-CLASSICAL AUTH (FALLER) T 1, Th 1-3
Major writings of Jonathan Swift, Alexander Pope, Daniel Defoe.
These to be viewed not only in terms of their literary merits, but
as they relate to pressing concerns-religious, political, eco-
nomic, social--of the first part of the eighteenth century, a
period which in many ways anticipates our own. Informal lecture.
453 ENGL ROMANTIC AUTH (SMIEHOROWSKI) MWF 3
Extensive readings in four major Romantic poets: Coleridge,
Shelley, Keats, and Byron.
455 (LING 499) 'INDIAN LIT/LING (KHANNA) MWF 3
Readings in major genres and major authors: devotional poetry,
love poetry and modern fiction; Kabir, Ghalib, Tagore, Prem-
chand. We will read some Western writing about India (Kipling's
Kim and Hesse's Siddharta), some medieval Sanskrit poetry
and then go on to North Indian vernacular literatures.
463 MAJ ENGL AUTH-VICT (HORNBACK) MWF 3
The first four weeks of the course will be spent reading selected
poems of Matthew Arnold, Gerard Manley Hopkins, and Thomas
Hardy, exploring the ways they understand human freedom. The
remainder of the term will be spent investigating this theme in
John Stuart Mill's On Liberty, Walter Pater's Renaissance (the
"text" for the late nineteenth century aesthetic movement),
George Eliot's Middlemarch, Henry James's The Princess Casa-
massima, and Thomas Hardy's Tess of the D' Urbervilles. The
title for this course comes from Pater, who says that the pur-
pose of literature is "to satisfy the spirit" by giving us "a sense
of freedom." An attempt will be made to reconcile that state-
ment with the more traditional definition of literature's purpose
--to teach and delight-; to find out how this concept applies to
the different authors and their works; to relate the idea of
"freedom" to the idea of "tragedy"; and to appreciate the
representations of human freedom, finally, which are found in
Eliot's, James's, and Hardy's novels.
465-1 MODERN ENGL AUTH (BARROWS) MWF 11
The course will. attempt to give an idea of the literature of the
Modern Period in terms of four representative writers: W. B.
Yeats (Selected Poetry and Two Plays, ed. Rosenthal); D. H.
Lawrence (Sons and Lovers, Women in Love, Phoenix 1); Joseph
Conrad (Under Western Eyes); Virginia Woolf (Mrs. Dalloway,
and To the Lighthouse).
465-2 MODERN ENGL AUTH (FORSTNER) MWF 1
A close examination of- the major works of D. H. Lawrence,
Virginia Woolf, and Samuel Beckett. Approximately a dozen
novels will be read and students are well advised to read many
of them over the summer. Works include: Sons and Lovers, The
Rainbow, Women in Love, The Man Who Died, Mrs. Dalloway,
To the Lighthouse, The Waves, Between the Acts, Murphy,
Watt, Molloy, Malone Dies, The Unnamable, How It Is.
469 AMER AUTH TO 1870 (RUCKER) MWF 10
Authors treated: Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Emerson. Although
the course is not designed to trace a particular theme, the works
of each author will be analyzed to discover typical themes and
methods. The class will be conducted through lecture and dis-
cussion.
470 AMER AUTH TO 114 (POWERS) MWF 2
The readings will include representative works (fiction and non-
fiction) of Mark Twain and Henry James. The focus will be on
the literary production of these two major American writers;
sufficient biographical and historical information will be included
to provide an adequate background for an appreciation of their
achievement. The course will attempt to validate the applica-
tion of the two adjectives "major" and "American"-to Twain
and James; to discover the fundamentally similar preoccupations
of the work of these two apparently quite different writers; and
to estimate their contribution to the culural life of succeeding
times up to the present.
471-1 AMER AUTH 1914-PRES (EBY) T 10, Th 10-12
This course will attempt to broaden the base of the traditional
major-authors format by examining, at the rate of one text
each week, representative novels by thirteen American writers
of the past half-century. Fiction is seen as craft, as expression
of individual voice, and as register of cultural dynamics beyond
the artist's control. Individual novels will be analyzed critically
and related to trends and themes held in common. In a term
paper the student will attempt to discover co-ordinates within
the texts studied, or he will explore in greater detail the work of

478-2 (HUM 464) AMER DRAMA (BAULAND) MWF 2
The focus of study in English 478 will be the major dramas of
four modern American playwrights: Eugene O'Neill, Tennessee
Williams, Arthur Miller, and Edward Allbee. Scattered between,
among, and around these four nuclei will be the reading of some
single plays by significant dramatists in the modern American
theater (e.g. Rice, Kaufman, Odets) and representative selec-
tions from some important movements (e.g. Off-Broadway, Off-
Off-Broadway, Black Theater) to round out the picture of
American dramaturgy from the end of World War I to the
present day. The course will begin with a very brief overview of
the history of the American drama and theater before their
coming-of-age in the early 20's. The plays discussed in class will
be treated as dramatic literature, as theatrical art, and as
manifestations of their historical, philosophical, and social
milieu. The course will attempt to concentrate on an intensive
study of major dramatists while not neglecting the scope of
modern American dramatic productivity and theatrical activity.
A core of common reading forms the basis for class discussion,
Students will also fulfill an outside readingsrequirement by mak-
ing selections from a list of interesting American plays.

480 SENIOR SEMINAR (RAEBURN)
For senior honors concentration.

MWF 11

481 (HUM 416) ENGL BIBL (ORLIN) MWF 3
A study of the composition, cultural background, literary
characteristics, and theological intent -of the chief literary genres
represented in the Bible. Some time will be devoted at the end
of the term to the close examination of the use of the Bible by
one major English poet, perhaps Herbert or Vaughan,

483 (HUM 455) LIT & MOD THOT

(LEECH) MWF 11

489 TEACH ENGL
See time schedule.

(STAFF)

491 ROMANTICISM (BARROWS) MWF 2
For senior honors concentration.
492 STUDIES IN 19 C LIT (WEILAND) MWF 9
For senior honors concentration.
496 LIT STUDIES FR 1800 (WEISBUCH) MWF 1
The victorian novelist's claims on "reality" are extraordinarily
solid, and, at least superficially, objectified. We will consider
the strengths and the inadequacies of a stringently mimetic
art by a close examination of several navels and of a few great
prose romances that challenge the realist's reality. Austen,
Dickens and Eliot will be our realists; Emily Bronte and Mel-
ville will challenge them; Henry James will mediate.
497 STUDY INDI AUTHORS (HORNBACK) MWF 2
Major author: Dickens. A reading of six novels-Oliver Twist,
Martin Chuzzlewit, David Copperfield, Bleak House, Great Ex-
pectations, Our Mutual Friend-with reference both to the tra-
dition of Romanticism in English literature immediately preceding
Dickens (Blake, Wordsworth, Shelley primarily) and to the
world of 1973, to which Dickens's ideas and imagination relate.
Charles Reich says, in The Greening of America, that Dickens
wrote a hundred years ago about the problems wehare facing
today. That is true-but more importantly, Dickens found some
of the answers to those problems in the way he saw life. The
focus, then, of this course, will be on the philosophical dimen-
sion of Dickens's works as well as on the pleasure we find in
reading them.
FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS:
501 (GERM) OLD ENGLISH (ROBINSON) MWF 11
The course is an introduction to reading and interpreting Old
English texts, The aim of the course is to prepare students to
approach Old English literary and non-literary texts with some
competence and confidence.yStudents will be expected to learn
the rudiments of the morphology and syntax of Old English as
such knoiledge is necessary to reading with comprehension;
they will ,be expected to learn to pronounce Old English and
acquire a workable vocabulary. There will be almost daily read-
ingtassignments in Old English prose; some assignments late
in the term in Old English poetry.
503 OLD ENGLISH LYRIC (KUHN) MWF 3
Anon, poems in Old English, chiefly in The Exeter Book and in
E.V.K. Dobbie's The Anglo-Saxon Minor Poems, but with some
selections from The Paris Psalter and the meters of Boethius.
The class will read and discuss about forty lyric and meditative
poems of various kinds, including Caedmon's Hymn, Bede's
Death Song, The Rune Poem, The Riming Poem, Gifts of Men,
Fortunes of Men, Order of the World, Exile's Lament, Wanderer,
Seafarer, Deor, Wife's Lament, Husband's Message, several
advent lyrics from Christ I, and selected riddles and metrical
charms.
504 MIDDLE ENGLISH (McSPARRAN) MWF 10
This is nnintroducitory couirein Middle Enalish. nd is z ri-

523-2 CREATIVE WRITING (HAUGH) ARR
A writing course for graduate students. Any form o imaginative
writing qualifies: poetry, fiction, drama. It is assumed that the
writer is fairly well advanced; that what he wants from the pro-
fessor is editor, coach, intelligent reader, and taskmaster. Manu-
scripts must be submitted to the professor for admission to
the course. The tutorial, conference method is used throughout
the term.
531 CONTEMP LIT (DORIA) MWF 3
American Poetry since 1945. A survey of the major representa-
tives of the Black Mountain school, the San Francisco Renais-
sance (the Beats), the confessional poets, the New York poets
and assorted figures who defy categorization. Some authors
treated will be William Carlos Williams, Robert Lowell, Charles
Olson, Allen Ginsberg, Denise Levertov, John Ashbery, Robert
Duncan, Leroi Jones, and Charles Bukowski.
537 RHET & POETICS (SCHULZE) MWF 11
Readings in the history of criticism. Special attention to perennial
problems of definition, interpretation and evaluation concerning
such ideas as imitation, imagination, form and meaning, and
the historic roles of art and criticism.
545 CHAUCER-CANT TALES (HAMILTON) MWF 1
Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales. And as supplementary reading,
Dante, Boccaccio, and Rabelais, Langland and the Pearl poet.
A combination of activities: reading aloud, discussion and
lecture, oral reports, papers. Readings and discussion of The
Canterbury Tales should be central. Open to graduate students
willing to do a great deal of work on their own and interested
in narrative literature generally. Hence the 'great books' context
of the continental writers and the inclusion of Chaucer's English
contemporaries. All books will be made available in paperback
translations, or modernizations; everyone will be expected to
read widely in them.
569 AMER LIT (McDOUGAL) ThTh 10:30-12
A study of American poetry from the turn of the century to
WW II. We will read the following poets exclusively-Ezra
Pound, T.S. Eliot, Robert Frost, William Carlos Williams, Mari-
anne Moore, Hart Crane and Wallace Stevens, with some back-
ward glances at important antecedents, e.g. the French Symbol-
ists. Some attention will also be given to movements, e.g.
imagism."
571 AMER LIT 1914-PRES (DAVIS) MWF 4
This graduate reading course will attempt to define intellectual
attitudes--such as pragmaticsm, naturalism, hedonism, religious
and rationalistic humanism-in the work of important 20th
Century American writers, with emphasis on essay, poetry, and
drama rather than on prose fiction. Depending on the avail-
ability of texts, readings will probably consist of A William
James Reader (Riverside); Robinson's Selected Poems (Collier),
Stevens' The Palm at the. End of the Mind: Selected Poems and
a Play, and The Necessary Angel (both Vintage), Eliot's Chris-
tianity and Culture, The Family Reunion, The Cocktail Party,
and The Elder Statesman (all Harvest), and Winters' In Defense
of Reason (Swallow).
580 DEVELOPMENT OF LITERACY
(ROBINSON & VAN'T HUL) ARR
Consideration of developments in rhetoric, linguistics, pedagog-
ical theory, as these bear on the task of teaching writing and
reading to (mainly). adults, especially adults enrolled in open
door institutions. The course is required of students in the
Doctor of Arts programs; permission of instructors is required
of others,
582 LIT & CONTEMP ARTS (FELHEIM) T 2-4, Th 2
This course relates the popular arts (film, comic books, radio,
TV) to literature within a broad frame of reference and tries
to discover common aesthetic principles. In addition, it relates
popular literary genres (science fiction, mystery fiction, songs)
to the more elitist forms.
593 BIBL & RES METHODS (OGDEN) MWF 9
This course falls into four parts: heuristic bibliography (how to
find information and evience in big libraries); physical bibliog-
raphy (how books are made physcally and how ths knowledge
serves scholars); methodology (the assumptions and the logic
underlying the procedures and the conclusions of scholars) , and
form and editorial conventions in scholarly presentation. Text-
books: Donald F. Bond, Reference Guide to English Studies (Chi-
cago); R. B. McKerrow, Introduction to Bibliography; Wellek
and Warren, Theory of Literature; Edward Hirsch, Validity in
Interpretation; and Kate Turabian, Manual for Dissertation
Writers.
PROSEMINARS:
611 ENGLISH LANGUAGE (BAILEY) ARR
The first half of a proseminar in English language, allowing
students to pursue a variety of topics reflecting their own in-
terests and previous experience in language study. Among these
might be: English dialects (past or present), current theories
in metrics and stylistics, issues in the teaching of English reflect-
ing linguistic questions, problems in syntax and phonology. The
course will deal in part with the research methods and resources;
students will be given assistance in identifying a topic for the
proseminar paper (to be written in English 612 in the Winter
term). Students who are not contemplating the proseminar se-
quence in English language are also invited to participate.
631 PROSE FICTION (HOWES) T 2, Th 2-4
'This course will focus on the novel as a genre. It will include a
wide variety of novels from differentshistorical periods and from
different cultural backgrounds, arranged in groups to facilitate
comparisons and illustrate hstorical developments. Most ofthe
specific works will be chosen by the class itself after the class
has convened and had a chance to compare notes on back-
grounds and interests. There will be some reading of major
critics of the novel (for example, Booth's Rhetoric of Fiction)
to provide a context for the discussion of particular works.

whom Professor Bauland invites to consult with him (and urges
to bring their suggestions) during the current term, at the end
of which the precise subject matter of the seminar will be posted.
Interdisciplinary as well as international problems are encour-
aged. During the second semester (634), for which the first is
prerequisite, each student will work on an individual project
leading to a substantial critical/scholarly essay. The various
works in progress, which will probably (though not necessarily)
emerge from the matter of 633, will determine the classroom
content of the second term, with each student leading his col-
leagues in discussion and suggesting their preparatory reading
for intelligent participation in his particular project. The in-
structor will work closely with each student on the preparation
of his individual wo-k. Students will define their 634 topics
before the end of 633. Enrollment in 633-4 presupposes some
familiarity with modern world 'drama.
637 CRITICISM (WILLIAMS) W 1, F 1-3
The first semester of, a year-long sequence on the history of
literary theory. During the fall term we will study critics and
the development of critical concepts from Plato to Johnson; in
the winter term 638 will be devoted to a study of the relevant
material from Kant to Frye. The emphasis both terms will be
on the acquisition of significant and highly differentiated critical
complexes as seen wth their larger philosophical, social, and
literary contexts.
645 ENGL LIT MID AGES (REIDY) M 10, F 10-12
The year sequence (645-6) will cover anything (though not
everything) from Widsith to Malory. Readings will be to some
extent determined by the needs or desires of the student, but
we will read at least some Old English in the original, and in
Middle English we will read works not covered in English 542,
especially (in the second semester) the devotional and mystical
prose writers.
647-1 ENGL LIT RENAISS (CREETH) T 3, Th 3-5
Subtitle: Elizabethan vs. Jacobean.
Authors treated include: Sidney, Spenser, Hooker, Marlowe, Jon-
son, Donne, Bacon. A course conducted by discussions, short
lectures, frequent reports in literature from shortly before
and after the turn of the seventeenth century. An effort to
define and understand the broad change that occurred from
Elizabethan to Jacobean times in the various genres. Chief con-
cepts to be considered: Scholasticism and Christian Humanism,
Socialism, Anglican vs. Presbyterian, Puritanism, Machiavel-
lianism, New Philosophy, Courtly and Platonic Love, Petrar-
chanism.
647-2 ENGL LIT RENAISS (JENSEN) W 10, F 10-12
English 647-8 will be a pro-seminar in English Renaissance
comedy, focussed on comic dramatists in England from the early
sixteenth century through the first quarter of the seventeenth
century. In the first term members of the class will read an
extensive andrepresentativebselection of comedies from this
period. Class meetings will be given over to discussion of in-
dividual plays and to the presentation of special reports. By
December, students should beresonably well acquanted with
most of the following matters: the development and forms of
Renaissance comedy, the Elizabethan stage, the growth of
dramatic companies, comic stagecraft and comic conventions,
Renaissance comic theory. In the winter term, each student will
prepare a single long paper on a topic of his own choice. Stu-
dents may enroll for the first term only; in such cases, their
work in English 647 may be adjusted to their particular needs.
651 NEO-CLASSICAL (BAKER) M 3, W 3-5
Authors treated include: Swift (Tale of a Tub), Pope, Fielding,
Johnson. The course will begin with reading and comparing two
books: Basil Willey in The Eighteenth-Century Background and
Donald Greene's new The Age of Exuberance. Each student will
then develop and present a brief paper on some aspect of the
four authors we shall read and discuss. A final examination will
relate the general concepts to particular passages.
653 ENGL LIT ROMANTIC '(WRIGHT) T 1, Th 1-3
Readings in Blake, Coleridge, Shelley, Keats and in some current
scholarship on their work. Discussion (partly based on short
reports) and, depending on topic, one or two papers relating
readings and authors to currentscholarly opinion. (654 will
treat later Blake and topics in Romanticism.)
659 ENGL LIT VICTORIAN (HILL) T 3, Th 3-5
Readings in the major Victorian poets: Tennyson, Browning,
Arnold, Swinburne, Hopkins, Hardy. Supplementary readings in
the lesser poets, in selected Victorian prose writings, and in
modern studies of Victorian ideas, attitudes, and values. We
will try to keep in view and to appreciate the effects in the
poetry of the growing importance of exact science arid scholar-
ship, the unsettlement of religious faith, the recognition of
economic hardships and inequities, the extension of democracy,
and other tendencies and preoccupations of the time. Where
we can we will see the poems as efforts of the poet to locate,
identify, define, or express himself in response to such complex
ideas and forces.
665 ENGL LIT MODERN (BORNSTEIN) T 10, Th 10-12
Extensive reading in the origins (Romanticism, Symbolism, the
nineties) and development of the Modern Period.

A'.

A

I

669 AMERICAN LIT
Melville.

(FRANKLIN)

T 1, Th 1-3

INTELLECTUAL HISTORY:
745 HIST-M AGES & RENAISS (ARTHOS) MWF 1
Subtitle: Shakespeare and the Universality of Reason.
A study of Shakespeare in the light of current developments in
philosophy. Bruno and Bacon among others.
SEMINARS:

811 ENGLISH LANGUAGE (DOWNER)
The language of the Pearl poet,

ARR

831 FICTION (KONIGSBERG) ARR
An investigation into the aesthetics of the novel and narrative
technique. The seminar will move towards a "poetics" of the
novel by beginning with a few classic works (perhaps Pride and
Prejudice, Middlemarch, and The Sound and The Fury). The
reading of additional novels will be determined by the direction
of class discussion. The group will also read some basic texts
in novel criticism and test the usefulness of certain critical
approaches towards fiction, especially those dealing with tech-
nique, psychology, and structure. The ultimate goals of the
seminar are to work out a critical vocabulary and comprehen-
sive theory that incorporate the writer, the text, and the reader.
847 ENGL LIT RENAISS (ENGLISH) ARR
Course is scheduled to be a seminar on Sidney or Sidney and
Spenser, but will accommodate to the interests of Ph.D. stu-
dents in the Renaissance. Prospective students (in other areas,
as well as in the Renaissance) are invited to leave a note with
the Graduate Secretary indicating the kind of seminar they
would prefer. If useful, a meeting will be held later in the
winter term to discuss possibilities.

865 ENGI IT AMODENi

(ALDIDGE)

ARR

1 007 CNJL LI I MVLlCKFN IALLIKILF%3c1 14 KK

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