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January 09, 1973 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-01-09

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Pcige Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Tu ipd,-r\.,nuarv 90 1

... a- IX17 7r I

l w : Ily, lu i l ly ,I r

.Kissinger,

'Iho

resume

secret talks

Waiting for You
Welcome Back

I

Da Nang base bombed
by mistake; 10 injtred
By AP and UPI
PARIS-The talks between Henry Kissinger and Le Duc
Tho resumed yesterday in an apparently icy atmosphere. An
aura of grim confrontation hung over the new efforts to ne-
gotiate a Vietnam peace settlement.
In Vietnam, American fighter-bombers from the Air
Force, Navy and Marines yesterday mistakenly bombed the
sprawling Da Nang Air Base in what military sources said
was an apparent navigational error.
Nine Americans and a Vietnamese military guard were

-AP Photo
Smiling suspects
Four of seven Watergate trial defendants and their attorney talk jovially between court sessions in
Washington yesterday, where they are charged in connection with the break-in of Democratic head-
quarters and the alleged bugging of the offices. From left: Virgilio Gonzales, Frank Sturgis, Eugenio
Martinez, attorney Henry Rothblatt, and Bernard Barker.
RAIRLAND BATTLES:
...Syrian, Israeli armies clash

High Court to
rule on slow
trial issue
WASHINGTON ,) - The Su-
preme Court yesterday agreed to
decide whether prisoners who were
denied a speedy trial are entitled
to have their convictions set aside
or only to have their sentences re-
duced.
In the case accepted yesterday,
for review later in the term, the
U.S. Circuit Court in Chicago ruled
the government had been unrea-
sonably slow in bringing a local
man to trial for auto theft and
ordered his sentence reduced by
10 months.
The Ft. Leavenworth, Kan.,
prisoner, Clarence Strunk,Kap-
pealed to the Supreme Court, argu-
ing that under the Constitution's
guarantee of a speedy trial "the
conviction itself was no longer
valid."
In a second action, the Court
ruled ruled 6-3 that state supreme
court judges may be elected from
districts that are unequal in popu-
lation.
The unsigned, one-line decision
agreed with a three-judge federal
panel in Baton Rouge, La., that
"the rationale behind the one-man,
one-vote principle which evolved
f out of efforts to preserve a truly
representative form of govern-
ment is simply not relevant to the
makeup of the judiciary.''

injured.
President Nixon's security ad-
viser and the North Vietnamese
Politburo member conferred for
41/2 hours in a Communist-owned
villa in a Paris suburb. It was
their first meeting since the talks
were suspended on Dec. 13 and
President Nixon unleashed an un-
precedented wave of bombing at-
tacks on the North Vietnamese
heartland.
For the first time, there werej
no smiles or handshakes between,
the two sides, and Tho left Kis-
singer standing on the doorstep for
almost a minute without sending
an aide to escort him inside.
Kissinger finally pushed open the
door and walked in, followed by
deputy assistant secretary of state,
William Sullivan, and other aides.I
At the end of the meeting, the
North Vietnamese again broke
with long-established custom and
conspicuously failedd to escort the
Americans to the door. Kissinger,
left grim-faced, without his fa-
miliar smile.
Communistsources said private-
ly that Tho's snub to Kissinger was
a reflection of the strong feelings
aroused in North Vietnam by ther
bombing of Hanoi and Haiphong in
which thousands of civilians were
claimed killed or injured.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michiaan. News phone: 764-0562. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-I
igan 420 Maynard Street. Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-1
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier icampusiarea); $11 local mail
(in Mich. or Ohio); $13 non-local mail
(other states and foreign).
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
area); $6.50 local mail (in Mich. or
Ohio); $7 50 non-local mail (other
states and foreign).

B-M BARBERS
znd STYLISTS
Michigan Union
TUES.
Early Silent Classics
GREAT TRAIN
ROBBERY
Dir. Edwin Porter 1905
PLUS:
FOUR GRIFFITH
SHORTS
Battle of Elderbush Gulch,
(1913), Judith of Bethu-
jia (1913), The New
York Hat (1912), Lone-
dole Operator (1911),
And three films by George
Melies.
Shows at 7 & 9 p.m.
WED.
INTOLERANCE
D. W. Griffith
7 & 10 p.m.
ARCH ITECTURE
AUDITORIUM
Price Now $1-Sorry!

HE

SHE

I

Sunday & Monday: Quarter Nights
(BEER & WINE)
Tuesday: 12 Price Night
Dkncing Every Night frcm 8 p.m. to 2a.m.
341 South Main 769-5960

By Reuters
Syrian and Israeli forces fought
a series of air and ground battles
over the Golan Heights Monday
and. Syria called on other Arab
rmiies to move immediately to
confront Israel on the battle-
front.
Israel reported shooting down
six Syrian MIG-21 jets without
losing a'plane in air battles above
the front where tanks and artil-
Iery. ought until dusk last night.
A . military spokesperson in
",Damascus',, Syria, said four Is-
-.raeli planes had been shot down
during' eight hours of fighting in
which three Syrian jets, two
tanks and two radar stations
were hit.
Syrian gunfire destroyed 15 Is-
raeli tanks and 10 artillery bat-
teries, 'an4 a number of positions
and observation posts on the
Golan Heights, the Syrian army
command ieported.
Israel claimed to have knocked
out six Syrian tanks in the fight-
ing-the. most serious so far in
ladelphla
hit hy school
strke again
PHILADELPN IA. (UPI) - Pub-
lic school teachers, vowing to defy
any court order against a walkout,
yesterday resumed a strike that
kept 285,000 pupils out of class for
three weeks last September.
Despite temperatures as low as
14 degrees, pickets appeared as
early at 4 a.m. outside several
schools in the .nation's fourth larg-
est city.
A spokesman for the Philadelphia
Federation. of teachers said the
picketing was "at least as effec-
tive" as last September when the
city's 280 public schools were clos-
ed by the walkout.
The Board. of Education had.c
vowed to keep the schools open de-
spite resumption of the walkout
over a contract dispute but by
mid-morning 13 of the city's 22
high schools were closed. .

the run of blow-for-blow battles
along the explosive ceasefire
line since mid-October. It denied
any of its own tanks were de-
stroyed or knocked out of action.
In at least six separate air
raids beginning yesterday morn-
ing, Israel claimed to have blast-
ed four Syrian radar stations,
two guerrilla bases, a gun bat-
tery and three military camps
inside Syria.
At the height of the fighting,
Syria called on other Arab states
and armies to move immediately
to take their place along the bat-
tle line with Israel.
The appeal, broadcast in an
official commentary over Dama-

scus radio, said Syria hoped that
the Arab states' attitude would
not be confined to moral support
and "statements from a dis-
tance."
Arab silence would give the
Israelis the opportunity to pre-
pare for a new "expansionist
leap" which would lead to the
loss of additional Arab territory,
it said.
"The voice of the Arab masses
. calls for all Arab states and
armies to take their normal
place along the confrontation line
against Israel in order to accom-
plish the 'historical and sacred
mission of liberating Arab terri-
tory," the statement added.

i _._

- - - ---- ---

OVERBECK
BOOKSTORE
WILL BE OPEN

Join The Daily
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Come in cany afternoon
420 Maynard
NEW WORLD FILM COOP presents

Monday, Jan. 8th-Thursday, Jan.
9:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M.
FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE

11th

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(formerly Slater's Books)

UAC-DAYSTAR PRESENTS
Jr. Walker & The Alistars!

I

Luther Allison-Bobby "Blue" Band
MOJO BOOGIE BAND

ALSO
Lenny Bruce in "THANK YOU MASK MAN"
"perhaps the best animated short ever made"-N.Y. Times
WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY
7:30 p.m. Jan. 10 & 11 9:30 p.m.
NATURAL SCIENCE AUD. (U of M campus)

----

COURSE MART 315
3 hours credit, pass-fail, taught by Prof. E. Katz
Rudolf Steiner's Road to Sensible
and Supersensible Knowledge
MEETS M W F 10 A.M. IN ROOM 1041 RANDALL LAB
The course offers a unique opportunity to study in depth
two of Steiner's basic works:
1. Knowledge of Higher Worlds and Its Attainment

"Luther Allison's
impeccable,
unbelievably fast
guitar work made'
almost every other
guitarist pale by
comparison-and
at this festival,
that's saying
something.'"
John Weisman
DETROIT FREE PRESS
review of 1 972 Blues
and Jazz Festival
"Luther's playing
is a blend of
Jimi Hendrix and
B.B. King ... the
effect is dazzling."
THE MONTREAL STAR

I

I

Photo Credit: DOUG FULTON
SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 7 p.m.-Hill Aud.
Reserved seats 4.50, 3.50, 2.50 now on sale
MICHIGAN UNION: 1) -5:30 MONDAY-SAT.

~~.uwmw' . <. -

.

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