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February 27, 1973 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-02-27

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

I uesday, February 27, 1973'

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY I uesday, February 27', ~ 973

APPROVAL EXPECTED:
Vietnam ceasefire conference
opening marred by differences

ANAIS NIN
Lecture and Readings from Her Work
TONIGHT
8 p.m.
Rackham Lecture Hall
SPONSORS: Center for Continuing Education of
Women, Department of English, Women Advocate's
Office

By AP and Reuters
PARIS - The international con-k
ference to give great-power back-
ing to the Vietnam peace agree-
ment got off to a brisk and busi-
nesslike start yesterday, but fun-
damental differences emerged on
how the ceasefire should be made
effective.
But clashes of principle and pro-
cedure among the 13 participants
seemed capable of compromise and
the confident forecast of delegates
was that the parties involved will
sign a "hands-off-Vietnam" prom-
ise on Friday.
China's foreign minister C h i
Peng-Fei, U.S. Secretary of State
William Rogers and France's Mau-

rice Schumann were among six terday's opening session. ed bilaterally with the govern-
speakers at the first session of the Canada, he said, would quit the ments or from international organ-
conference, which brings the big International Commission of Con- izations because this was more ra-
five powers together to discuss In- trol and Supervision on April 301 pid, a spokesman said.
dochina for the first time since unless some system could be North Vietnam's delegate, Nguy-
1962. agreed for dealing with violations en Thanh Le, appeared to dash
These exchanges came after the of the cease-fire. American hopes of getting the con-!
conference had swiftly adopted a Presenting a formal resolution on' ference to exert pressure to make
set of rules for itself. They pro- the issue he urged a definite role the ceasefire in Laos effective and
vided for U.S. and North Vietnam- for > U.N. Secretary-General Kurt to halt the fighting in Cambodia.
ese experts to produce the first Waldheim - a role empowering He told a press briefing t h a t
draft of a declaration which the him to reconvene the conference in North Vietnam disagreed with a
conference as a whole will pre- 'ertain circumstances. proposal by Rogers that the con-
sent as its final act. The Canadian demand won im- ference should discuss Laos and
Mit~t,.he11 n fr-nmediate backing from Rogers - Cambodia.

FREE

PUBLIC INVITED

"""":

"I

of Canada, whose country is one of
four supervising the cease-fire, laid
down a virtual ultimatim at yes-

Nixon maintains 5.5
per cent pay ceiling

but in quick succession Ch i n e s e,
North Vietnamese and Viet Cong
spokesmen turned it down.
Essentially their objection is that'
the United Nations should stay out
I f the Indochinese scene.
As they see it, the problem of
peacekeeping should be settled by
the parties to the war themselves.
The North Vietnamese also re-
jected Western ideas for the con-
ference to discuss coordinated mul-
tilateral aid for the economic re-
construction of Vietnam.

'The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
agd by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0562. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-'
igan. 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
clay through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier (campus area); $11 local mail
(in Mich. or Ohio); $13 non-local mail
(other states and foreign).
Summer Session published Tuesday;
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
area); $6.50 local mail (in Mich. or
Ohio); $7.50 non-local mail (other
states and foreign).

EVERY WEDNESDAY:
MOJO BOOGIE BAND
THURSDAY:
LIVE MUSIC
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY:
LOCOMOBI LE

WASHINGTON (A) - The Nixon
administration said yesterday it
will retain the 5.5 per cent guide-
tine for wage increases during
Phase Three. But at the same time
it signalled some loosening of the
pay standard.
Confusion and contradictlmn cloak-
ed the major economic policy an-
nouncements.
The confusion developed when
President Nixon's chief economic
spokesman said that Phase Two's
basic wage standard would remain
in effect. At the same time, the ad-
ministration embraced a broadly
worded policy statement which
skirted any mention of the 5.5 per
cent standard.
The statement said "No single
Saccharin:
cancer link?
WASHINGTON (') - The Food
and Drug Administration (FDA)
said yesterday it is finding blad-
der tumors in rats fed saccharin,
but is awaiting further studies be-
fore making any decision on whe-
ther to ban the artificial sweeten-
er.
"We're not going to take any ac-
tion until we get a recommenda-
tion from the National Academy of
Sciences," said Virgil Wodicka,
director of FDA's Bureau of Foods.
He said FDA scientists are not
sure whether the rat bladder cel-
lular changes indicate cancer and,
if they do, whether saccharin caus-
ed it. But he acknowledged in re-
sponse to questioning that the tu-
mors are "suspicious."
The safety of saccharin h a s
been under extensive review since,
1969 when cyclamates were banned
because they caused cancer in la-
boratory animals. It is the only
artificial sweetener still on the
market.
The FDA has not completed its
two-year study of 96 rats, half
male and half female, which were
fed saccharin ranging from .01 to
7.5 per cent of their total daily
diets.
In January, 1972, the FDA re-'
moved saccharinsfromits list of
additives generally recognized as
safe, and limited the average:
adult's intake to no more than one
gram.
Where Ann Arbor
touches the
Atlantic Ocean!
This--- year old
Railroad Station
has gone
Seafood Restaurant.
brings a bit of Maine
right to Ann Arbor
Dinner Nightly
Including Sundays
Lunch Weekdays
401 Depot t.
Ann ArborMichigan
Reservations Recomended
769-0592

standard or settlement can be
equally applicable at one time to
all parties in an economy so large,
iecentralized and dynamic."
President Nixon's decision to
make the rigid guidelines m o rte
flexible appeared to be a major
:ncession to labor. Public a n d
private statements of administra
tion officials indicated the movr
was *an attempt to win labor's
backing for Nixon's revamped eco-
aomic program. AFL-CIO Presi
dent George Meany has opposed
the 5.5 per cent standard as too
low.
Meany said he was not surprised
at the Nixon administration decis-
ion.
"We eventually hope to get away
from the ceiling," Meany s a i d
yesterday at a news conference.
"If we're going to have a figure,
it should be 7.5 or 8 perncent.'
Nixon announced last month that
he was ending Phase Two's manda-
tory wage-price controls for all but
the food, health and construction
industries.
One of the relaxations that had
been expected was permitting
wage increases to take into ac-
count the continuing rise in the
cost of living which rose at an an-
nual rate of six per cent last
month.

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Od 2 re
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TUESDAY, FEB. 27
James Stewart Shelley Winters
t WINCHESTER'73
A cowboy sets women and horses aside for the loveI
of a new rifle, has it stolen, and romps through the
West trying to get it back.
"A frisky, fast moving, funny Western.--N.Y. Times
0S
WEDNESDAY:
WAGON MASTER with Ward Bond
and James Arness
ARCHITECTURE AUD. 7 & 9 $1.00
PATRICK MARVIN FELHEIM
SPINK JAMES VANN

NOW SHOWING
DOUBLE FEATURE
"The film is an extension for
Rafelson, not a simple repeti-
tion of 'Five Easy Pieces.' It
deserves careful, serious an-
alysis."-Steven Farber in the
Sunday N.Y. Times
"I RRESISTABLY
FASCINATING!
CONSUMATE
PERFORMANCES!"
-Jay Cocks, Time
"A. Monopoly game
for lost souls."
-William Wolf,
Cue
JACK NICHOLSON
BRUCE DERN
ELLEN BURSTYN
in BOB RAFELSON'S
1'"M King
@1 Marvin
Featuring the same
director and star of
"FIVE EASY PIECES"
"FAT CITY"-7:15
"KING"-9:00

'"The
hit of
this year's
Cannes
Film Festival is
JOHN
HUSTON'S
-CHARLES CHAMPLIN,
Los Angeles Times
starring
STACY KEACH
JEFF BRIDGES
SUSAN TYRELL

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i
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M-Creative Arts Festival
PRESENTS A
PRIMAL'VISUA
EXPERIENCE*
with artist-filmmaker
STAN BRAKHAGE
a discussion-screening of newworks
-A series of films of sexual meditation.
-Films intrinsically involved with light.
-Several films that are strangers to the maker.
-Film made in the Pittsburgh Morgue.
TUES., FEB. 27-8:30 p.m.
Natural Science Auditorium
Brkhgewil-ALSO-
Brokhoge will appear and show other films
TUES.-3 p.m. in MLB Auditorium 3
WED.-3 p.m. in East Quad Auditorium
ALL EVENTS ARE FREE

ATTENTION

r

DIANE KIRK
WALTER

751970

ADALINE HUSZCZO

BILL COLES

1

i

"SOUND AND LIGHT"
AT THE MUSEUM OF ART
Spotlight on the Museum's Treasures with Illumination by Critics,
Experts, and Historians. A Background of Sound and a Climax
of Light!
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 28 AT 8 P.M.

The University of Michigan Mus
FREE ADMISSION
LIGHT SHOW

seum of Art
REFRESHMENTS

Imo~

---

NEW WORLD ME DIA presentsI

* PLEASE

STN

BY *

Your campus bookstore
carries powdered eggs...
POWDERED EGGS by Charles Simmons is a bawdy, hilarious
yet poignant novel about a recent fugitive from college...
twenty-one years old and much involved-with girls, the
Catholic Church, jobs, an apartment, a sports car, writing a
novel, a crazy Spaniard named Jose, an affair with an older
woman, and the outer reaches of his own imagination. William
Saroyan called it: "Great-a masterpiece." $1.25
plus all these other
important new Penguins
ROBOPATHS: People as Machines. Lewis Yablonsky. What can
be done about the robopaths-the people who pull the triggers
at Kent State, My Lai, and Attica... make policy in Washington
... and live next door? Dehumanized by regimentation, bureau-
cratization, and indiscriminate violence, they are growing more
numerous-and more frightening-in today's post-technological
society. $1.45
COLD WAR AND COUNTERREVOLUTION: The Foreign Policy
of John F. Kennedy. Richard J. Walton. In a radical re-evalua-
tion of President Kennedy's foreign policy, the author contends
that Kennedy was a hawkish counterrevolutionary whose vigor-
ous anticommunism prevailed over his sympathy for the op-
pressed peoples of the world. $1.45
THE BATTLE OF BOGSIDE. Clive Limpkin. A photographic
report from one of the centers of strife in Northern Ireland.
$4.95
SUPERSLAVE. Bill Stair and Tony Barrell. A cartoon for adults
in alternate black-and-white and color, and in a landscape for-
mat. A search or quest story like the first novels, but very much
of our time. $2.95
DEAD END: The Automobile in Mass Transportation. Ronald
A. Buel. A hard look at the fraud and corruption of America's
auto-highway-petroleum complex, with surprising new sug-
gestions for Improving mass transportation. $1.45
GREAT DAY COMING: Folk Music and the American Left.
R. Serge Denisoff. $2.50
INVITATION TO AN INQUEST: Reopening the Rosenberg
"Atom Spy" Case. Walter and Miriam Schneir. $2.95
FOUR BY OLAF STAPLEDON. The late Olaf Stapledce was a

C

l..

WHAT A GREAT
PICTURE!
THE MOVIE ALL OF
ANN ARBOR IS TALKING
ABOUT IS NOW IN ITS
3rd HIT WEEKI

starring DAVID PEEL as Freemont Zapata
"The Robin food of Guerrilla Television"

I

WINNER
of 4 Academy Award
Nominations Including
BEST BEST
PICTURE ACTRESS
Max von Sydow
Liv Ullmann
M-kj WTV14 Yat

MUSIC BY.
DAVID PEEL and THE
LOWER EAST SIDE
JOHN LENNON and
YOKO ONO
TEENAGE LUST 1984
and others
"In the very near future a band of radical freaks will take
over control of a communications satellite and begin to
broadcast messages to a captive world T.V. audience."

WITH:
WENDY APPLE
(Putney Swope)
ALEX BENNETT
(WPL J-FM)
ROBERTS BLOSSOM
(Slaughterhouse-5)
DAVID PEEL
(Apple-"The Pope
Smokes Dope")
and MORE

I

Followed by discussion

TONIGHT!-February 27th--ONLY!-7 & 9 p.m.

. I

{

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