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February 24, 1973 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-02-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Hoge Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

5oturdoy, February 24, 1913

r

Thinclads shine

in

the

By MARCIA MERKER
The winged feet of Michigan
thinclads led the Maize and Blue
to a glittering exhibition of speed
and strength in the Michigan
Open last night at Yost Field
House. Sparked by the lifetime
best of Terry Hart at 15 feet in
the pole vault and the season
best of Bob Mills in the 880, the
Wolverines outshone opponents
from such midwest colleges and
universities as Eastern Michigan
and Notre Dame.
"The most satisfying perform-
ance came from Bob Mills and
Eric Chapman," remarked Michi-
gan track mentor Dixon Farmer.
Chapman took first in the 880-
yd run in the clocking of 1:52.7,
seven tenths from qualifying for
the NCAA meet, while his com-
petition came from fellow team-
mate Mills with a 1:54.5.
Despite the exceptional efforts
of Terry Hart and Doug Gibbs in
the field events, Coach Farmer
commented, "The field events
were as flat as I've ever seen."
Gibbs assaulted 6-10 in his un-
official fourth effort in the high
jump.
In his first win of the year,
Brian Block triumphed in the
shot put, heaving 49-9. His best
put of the season at the Michigan
State Relays, marked 51-8.
Uniquely, the Wolverines finished
2, 3 and 4 in the triple jump
with Abe Butler leading the pack
at 47-2/.
The highlighting event of the
night was listed as the finale-

the mile relay. Michigan, how-
ever, was disqualified near the
race finish. Coach Farmer said,'
"It left a sour taste in our
mouth," as in these last two
meets the Wolverines have lost to
the second ranked, Michigan
State, and third ranked, Eastern
Michigan, mile relay teams in
the nation. Farmer refers to
Michigan thinclads, Al Cornwell,
Chapman, Greg Syphax and Kim
Rowe, as number four.
Godfrey Murray continued his
dominance this season in the
high hurdles. He took first over
Notre Dame's Tom McMannon
clocking 7.3.
In the mile run, Bill Bolster
was three seconds off his sea-

Open
son's best but he managed a vic-
tory over Eastern's Tori Hollan-
der. The Huron challenged Bol-
ster in the final laps but the
steadfast Wolverine quickened
the pace and won with ease.
The three mile posed no red
hot competition as Flint's Paul
Baldwin riveted the track and
won by half a lap. Jon Cross and
George Khouri managed third
and fifth, respectively.
The looming meet in the fu-
ture is next weekend at Purdue
in the Big Ten track champion-
ships. Track mentor Farmer
classes Indiana as the team to
win while Michigan State, Illinois
Wisconsin and Michigan will fight
for the second slot.

5'

1

'Mercury' Murray
ONE MILE RUN-Bill Bolster (M), 4:11.4 60 YD. HH-Godfrey Murray (M), 7.3
SHOT PUT-Brian Block (M), 49'9" 600 YD. RUN-Al Cornwell (M), 1:12.7
140 YD. DASH-Stan Vinson (EMU), 880 YD. RUN-Eric Chapman (M), 1:52.7
48.5 300 YD. DASH-Tom Randolph (AATC),
HIGH JUMP - Doug Gibbs (M), 6'8"; 32.0
60 YD. DASH-Carlos Woods (EMU), 6.4 THREE MILE RUN-Paul Baldwin
1000 YD. RUN-Bob Fortus (AATC), (Flint TC), 13:57.1
2:15.1 ONE MILE RELAY-EMU (Woodrow
LONG JUMP-Garrade Pettus (EMU), Williams, Willie Sims, Gene Thomas,
2210" Stan Vinson), 3:15.6
POLE VAULT-Robert Karr (AATC), TRIPLE JUMP-Cliff Larkin (Golden
15'10" Triangle), 47'814"

Daily Photo by STEVE KAGAN
MICHIGAN THINCLAD hopeful, Terry Hart, dazzled the crowd
last night at Yost Field House as he cleared 15-0 in the pole vault
for a new personal life time best. Hart finished second on misses.

LANIER STARS

Pistons combust Bullets

ByT he Associated Press
DETROIT-Bob Lanier's 10-foot
hook shot with 10 seconds left en-
abled the Detroit Pistons to edge
the Baltimore Bullets 107-105 last
night and move out of the National
Basketball Association's Midwest
Division cellar for the first time
since Nov. 4.
Lanier's shot climaxed a last-
minute combecak by the Pistons,
who fell behind by six points mid-

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Cougars growl JI4
UNIONDALE, N.Y. - Ted Mc- CA A of
Clam capped a Carolina scoring
burst midway in the second period
last night that put the Cougars NEW YORK () - The National
.> .: : ....::.:Collegiate Athletic Association has
e :mmsamasma s:::::::::aibarred its member coaches and
B' b d players from participating in a
B I boa r basketball series against the So-
viet Union later this year, Al Mc-
Tickets are now on sale for Guire, M a r q u e t t e Univer-
the 63rd annual Big Ten Swim- sity coach, said yesterday.
ming and Diving Championships The outspoken McGuire said that
to be held March 1-2-3 at Michi- he had been selected by the Ama-
gan's Matt Mann Pool. Tickets teur Athletic Union to coach the
for the preliminaries will cost U. S. national squad, but said
one dollar while admission to the NCAA would not permit him or
the evening finals will be two any other NCAA coach or play-
bucks. They can be purchased ers to take part under the threat
at the ticket office at the cor- of losing their eligibility.
nor of State and Hoover. "It's not that I care about

fs McGuire as coach

Super 8
Movie Camera
canon

coaching that much," said Mc-
Guire, who has, brought Marquette
to New York for today's game with
Fordham. "It's just the image
we will be presenting to the rest:
of the world.'
"Here we are replaying the
team that beat us in that very
controversial game at Munich and
we are faced with the possibility
of using players who dribble with
both hands. "I think it is a sad
situation." '
IN KANSAS City, headquartersI
of the National Collegiate Athletic
Association, it was acknowledged
that Walter Myers, Executive Di-
rector of the NCAA, had sent a
firm "no" response to McGuire's
request to coach the team.
The letter went to Dr. James
Scott, athletic director of Mar-
quette, and it said: "No student
of any NCAA institution may par-
ticipate in the games. No coach of
a member NCAA institution may1
be. attached in any way to the
games."
The reasoning behind the rul-
ing, Byers' office said, was that
the Amateur Athletic Union fla-
grantly made plans for the Rus-

way in the final period but finally
tied the score at 105-105 on a jump-
er by Dave Bing with 45 seconds
remaining.
After each team missed a shot,
the Pistons regained posession of
the ball with eight seconds re-
maining. In ranid-fire succession,
Wes Unseld of Baltimore, stole the
ball on the inbound Detroit pass,
only to quickly lose it to Detroit's
Curtis Rowe, who fed Lanier for
the winning basket.7
It was the third victory in a rowj
and ninth in the last 13 games for
the surging Pistons, who moved'
a half-game ahead of the idle
Kansas City-Omaha Kings into
third place in the Midwest Division.
The Bullets led 50-49 at the half,'
only to see the Pistons roar into'
a 64-56 edge early in the third
period. Baltimore again drew even,
only to see the Pistoins take a 78-71
edge into the last period.
Then early in the final quarter
the Bullets strung together four
baskets, two by Phil Chenier and
one each by Mike Riordan and
ArchieClark, to go in front 93-87,
before thecPistons put on their
dramatic comeback.
Lanier scored 30 points and Bing
25 to lead the Pistons. Chenier's
28 points topped the Bullets, the
Central Division leaders, who have
now lost three of their past four.

ahead for good and paved the way
to a 107-93 American Basketball
Association victory over the New
York Nets.
The Cougars, trailing 23-13 early
in the game, outscored New York
24-12 with McClain's l'ayup sending
the East Division leaders in front
to stay at 37-35. Carolina widened
the margin to 48-42 at the half.
The Nets trimmed the margin to
four noints early in the third period
but Ed Manning locked it up for
the Cougars, scoring five straight
points on a jump shot, a layup and
a free throw.
Billy Cunningham's 19 points and
15 apiece by Joe Caldwell and
Tom Owens led Carolina's bal-
anced attack. George Carter top-
ped the Nets with 20 points.
Whalers whale
BOSTON-Tom Webster scored a
pair of second period goals last
night, his 42nd and 43rd of the
World Hockey Association season,
to pace the New England Whalers
to a 4-2 victory over the Alberta
Oilers.
The victory moved the Whalers
to withinttwo points of the idle
Cleveland Crusaders in the race
for first place in the WHA East.

VS. RUSSIAN CAGERS

Swan song
RETIRING DAILY SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR Charles Bloom, seen
silently sobbing, put together his final sports page last night. The
soon-to-be senior editor was honored in a testimonial dinner at
Gino's. He received a gold-plated Sports Illustrated subscription
card, lifetime rights to the' Toronto Tors of APBA, a ,book on 1001
ways to cook dietetic linguini, and Marc Feldman's shoulder to
cry on.

a

sian basketball series without con-
sulting the International Basket-
ball Board . and also sought to
countermand long-existing NCAA
by-laws.
THE AAU and NCAA have been
at loggerheads for years, their
feud frequently threatening to hurt
American efforts in the Olympics
and other international events. The
NCAA last October withdrew its
support of the U.S. Olympic Com-
mittee because of that committee's
dominance by the AAU.
The Russian team is scheduled
to open an eight-game Amberican
tour in Salt Lake City April 26
and complete it at Lexington, Ky.,
May 11.
The series is of particular in-
terest because it was the Russians
who handed the United States its
only basketball defeat in Olympic
history at Munich, winning 51-50
in a wild, disputed finish.
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