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February 24, 1973 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-02-24

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, February 24, 19'13

....,........,o~........
THE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturday, February 24, 1913

'Famine in Michigan,
possible by2000
LANSING (UPI) - A famine in the year 2000 in Michigan "is
a possibility" unless more land is quickly converted into cropland,
according to a Michigan Agriculture Department report.
The report, released today, says Michigan will need eight million
acres of agricultural land for food production by the turn of the
century compared with the 6.5 million acres in production now.
"It is of absolutely critical concern that conversions of agricul-
tural crop lands to other uses be stopped immediately," said Agri-
culture Director Dale Ball.
According to the report if trends in land use in Michigan since
World War II continue, the state will have only 2.5 million acres left
for crop production by 2000.
Using what it termed "very conservative estimates" on such fac-
tors as population, consumer habits and economic changes, the report
said crop land is dwindling at an alarming rate and heading for a
1,358,636-acre deficit by 2000.
"Does this mean that the Michigan Department of Agriculture
believes there will be famine in Michigan in 2000? This is a possibility,
and we view the situation with utmost concern."
It is essential, the report continued, that land use plans for Michigan
be tailored so they do not further reduce land available for intensive
agricultural production.
Six factors might develop between now and 2000 to "forestall pro-
tracted and widespread food shortages," the report said:
-Relaxation of constraints on technology including those re-
straints which are currently imposed to protect the environment.
-A shift in food habits away from meat as a protein source to
vegetables as a protein source or less protein altogether.
-More reliance on agricultural imports from other states, assum-
ing that other states have the food products to share.
-A trend to even lower birth rates than projected and a halt to
migration into Michigan.
-An unexpected war or catastrophe which might diminish the
population which must be fed in 2000.
-Use of land now considered unfarmable for crops.
)lunge 4
in London.
The Dutch central bank w a s1
fnrt-dthuv t bu $2 u 4 26 million in

The Residential College Players Present:
2 ONE-ACT PLAYS
THE LESSON by IONESCO
AND
SOMETHING UNSPOKEN by WILLIAMS
8:00 p.m.
Feb. 23-25 EAST QUAD AUD. $1.00 Donation'

1}
C~4 it Mediatrics
SHAFT
7 and 9:30 p.m.
Friday & Saturday
Nat. Sci. Aud.
Only 75c Tickets on sale at 6 p.m.

i

P12?A LOY'S
S JBMARINES
30 Different Kinds
PIZZA
SICILIAN
PASTEES
WHOLE WHEAT'
Dorm Delivery
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, SUNDAY
663-7721'
333 E. HURON
OPEN DAILY AT 12:45
SHOWS AT 1:10-3-5-7-9 P.M.
i e.r , a .IIe'.
MIDWEST PREMIERE
ENGAGEMENT!
"EXCELLENT.
handsomely and sensitively film-
ed . . . endowed with a moody,
menacin' atmosphere. Excel-
lent performances abound."
--Variety
Asrr e.,ank...
a game nobody won

AP Photo

Kennedy criticized
Joseph Kennedy III, son of the late Sen. Robert Kennedy, responds to tough questions fired at him
at a news conference yesterday in the office of San Francisco's mayor Joseph Alioto. Kennedy was
recently hired as a temporary coordinator of social and health programs in a poor section of the
city, and immediately came under fire from a city official who questioned his qualifications.
GELD PRICES SETTLE:

Dollar
By AP and Reuters
the United States dollar ral-
ed from earlier falls on m o s t
European foreign exchange mar-
kets today, while the price of
gold,,which had been setfing re-
.cordsall last week, settled back
at the close of trading.
Gold jumped to a startling
price of 93/95 dollars an ounce
shortly after the bullion market
opened in Zurich but dropped to
87/89 dollars shortly before the
close.
On the Frankfurt foreign -ex-
change market the West German
central bank was forced to re-
verse its sales of dollars earlier
this week and buy again - al-
though in nothing like the quani-
tities which preceded the 10 per
cent devaluation of the dollar

rallies
against the price of gold two
weeks ago.
A government spokesman in
Bonn said the bank's purchases
totalled less than 10 million dol-
lars.
A leading London dealer com-
mented: "You cannot run an
international money system with
a permanent Friday crisis.
Something has to be done."
The dealer explained that "no
one wanted to hold dollars over
a weekend," apparently fear-
ing international monetary meas-
ures that might send the value
of the American money even
lower.
One such measure, widely
forecast in the exchanges, could
be a decision by Common Mar-
ket countries to free their cur-

after I
rencies for a joint float In rela-
tion to the dollar. In that event,
the E rnnan ciir rnsr. o uld

v
Offering Coi
etorion M e
Soups & Sa
made Bread4
Herb Teas 4
tural, Nutric

-d
implete Veg-
a I s, Speciol
lads, Home-
s & Desserts,
& Other Na-
:ious Foods.

ne r UrpIean u rUF1GU WUI U UUY Up 0'.U111
be likely to rise in dollar value. a vain effort to lift the
Britain's chancellor of the ex- lar off its floor level of
chequer, Anthony Barber, in Lon- guilders.
don's House of Commons and Dr. Dr. J. M. Van den Brink,
Guido Carli, president of Italy's ident of the Amsterdam-I
National Bank, in an interview dam Bank, told a news c
in Rome, both hinted at such ence the Netherlands ma
an e v e n t u a 1 i ,t y. Carli said to float the guilder alone a
it was hard to i m a g i n e the dollar if the monetar
any other solution to the crisis moil continues for long.
and Barber said the technicali- The Swedish state bank t
ties of a joint float were being about $12 million and th
studied. gian, British and French
Few dealers believed the two were believed to have 1
statements were entirely respon- similar amounts. A spok
sible for the wild first hour of for the Swiss bank said th
trading that sent the dollar plum- lar was supported briefly
meting on the exchanges and day, even though the Swiss
gold soaring $7 to $94 an ounce has been floating for mort
__._'_' a month, but not since tl

e dol-
2.8545
Pres-
Rotter-
confer-
y have
against
y tur-
'ook in
e Bel-
banks
bought
esman
he dol-
Tues-
franc
- than
then.

I PANAVISIONO G
NI1ETROCOI 09 G

Y)7WL IFOOD5 )SJJYUVWT
.5 SA7T( SZANN AI'BOP1% 16-7118'

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Strikeemts coe
Special to The Daily "to force a resolution to the strike as soon as

BENTON HARBOR - Striking teachers at
Lake Michigan Community College have been
joined by students in a class boycott here.
The teachers, members of the American Fed-
eration of Teachers (AFT) Local 1755, walked out
Feb. 15, in a contract dispute with the school's
administration.
The teachers are demanding a 5.5 per cent
cost of living wage increase and a shortened
school year.
-:A spokeswoman for the Ad-hoc Student Com-
mittee, which is co-ordinating the student boy-
cott, yesterday described the student porticon of
the walk-out as "at least 99 per cent effective.'
Shesaid students at the college walked out

possible."
Beginning Monday, she said, classes will re-
open in so-called "Freedom Schools" set up by
teachers and students, if the strike has not been
settled.
Freedom school classes will be conducted off-
campus, in the homes of teachers and students.
Local businesses are being asked to donate
office space for classrooms as well.
Negotiations will continue during the weekend,
with the next session called for this afternoon. A
-mediator was called into the contract dispute ear-
lier this week.
"We are making progress," a member of the
AFT negotiating team said.

Library of Congress
The Michigan Daily, edited and man- I " unique style ...
aged by students at the University of impeccable taste.
Michigan. News phone: 764-0562. Second N.Y Times
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan. 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues- 141 i/ISIEE
clay through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier (campus area); $11 local mail
in Mich. or Ohio); $13 non-local mail
(other states and foreign).
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
area); $6.50 local mail (in Mich. or
Ohio); $7.50 non-local mail (other
states and foreign).

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LAST SHOW FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
"Movie of the Year!":
-Roling Stone Magazine
Vice. And Versa*

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_ _.._

EMU-MAJOR EVENTS COMMITTEE
PRESENTS:
JoGI ELS:f
MARK ALMOND and FOCUS
TICKETS ON SALE: $2.50, $3.50, $4.50
McKenny Union
Ann Arbor Music Mart
Huckleberry Party Store
MAIL ORDERS: E M U
Major Events Committee.
McKenny Union
v'nsi,-,. M c. 48107

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3
f

Mick Jagger.

And Mick Jagger.

performance.
A Goodtimes Enterprises Production from Warner Bros. in Technicolor.
Rai .u T0 FIN'S R IO3 N 11 0 0CR Aut4EO
plus Buster Crabbe in Chapter 4 of
"FLASH GORDON"
open 10:45 p.m.-starts 11:00 p.m.
no t iti ith "L t Hou on Lft"

.5

A BENEFIT FOR THE

nrcon inuous wir

m

Salvation Records
is having a special
on J. Geils, Mark
Almond, and Focus
albums for $3.29 each.
330 Maynard St.
Ann Arbor-9-8:00 p.m.
"ANN ARBOR'S OWN SALVATION"

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®

NEXT WEEKEND'S LATES
Kurt Vonnegut's "HAPPY BI
Qnd Flash G

LAST r use u Li
SHOW-March 2nd and 3rd
IRTHDAY, WANDA JUNE"
ordon No. 5
176l-19700

i
Y

The entire Ann Arbor area is talking about what a
great picture this is-you must see it to appreciate it!
HELD OVER-3rd HIT WEEK

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SAT./SUN.

Time Change 7 & 9:30

I UILD

NEW WORLD MEDIA presents
'PLEASE STAND BY'
"In the very near future a band of radical
freaks will take control of a communica-
tion satellite and broadcast bizarre mes-
sages to a captive world T.V. audience."
MUSIC BY-
JOHN LENNON and YOKO ONO
DAVID PEEL and the LOWER EAST SIDE
TEENAGE LUST & 1984
NEW RELEASE
A film by JACK & JOANNE MITON
coming soon-Sponsored by New World Film Coop
665-6734
Director and Producer will appear on

Mon.-Feb. 26

SUNDAY FUNNIES
PLUS
TERRY TATE & UNITED
SUPPLY CO.
Tue.-Feb. 27
NEW HEAVENLY BLUE
PLUS
MERLIN

£

WINNER OF 4 ACADEMY THU
AWARD NOMINATIONS, including SAT,
BEST PICTURE * BEST ACTRESS-LIV ULLMAN 'M 3;
"A FILM
"MASTERFUL ! WORTHY INTEGRIT)
OF A SECURE PLACE ON AN ARTIS
LISTS OF C I N E M A-'S MENT AS
GREAT FILMS!" THIS YEAF

RS-FRI at 6:40
& 9:05
SUN & WED at
:30, 6 PM, & 8:45
OF IMMENSE
Y, AS CERTAIN
STIC ACHIEVE-
I HAVE SEEN
R !"

HAMLET
Directed by prize-winning (Cannes) Grigori Kozinstev.
Russian translation by Boris Pasternak with English
subtitles. -Should be very exciting: ". . .A vast
Medieval melodrama . . . intense and graphic
actions in this immenseley pictorial film." Bosley

Wed.-Feb. 28
T.N.T.

4

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PA.. .

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